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Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but just one shot was fatal, research shows

A months-long investigation into Breonna Taylor's death has shed light on the final moments of the 26-year-old EMT

A months-long investigation into Breonna Taylor’s death has shed light on the final moments of the 26-year-old EMT

The three agents involved in Breonna Taylor’s deadly shooting shot 32 times after they raided her apartment, but only one shot was considered fatal, investigators found.

The Jefferson County grand jury announced on Wednesday the results of its investigation into the death of the 26-year-old EMT, who was killed in her apartment in a police raid on March 13.

Louisville officer Brett Hankison, who was fired in June, was charged with three counts of willful danger for firing into the homes of Taylor’s neighbors.

Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present during the deadly raid, were not charged.

In a press conference shortly after the grand jury decision, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, gave a detailed account of the sequence of events, which he said was pieced together by ballistic reports, 911 calls and witness interviews. due to the lack of bodycam footage.

The investigation shed light on Taylor’s final moments, revealing that she was shot a total of six times while standing in the hallway of her house next to boyfriend Kenneth Walker.

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered Apartment 4 at 3003 Springfield Drive and fired 32 shots. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but it was determined that only one would be fatal

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered Apartment 4 at 3003 Springfield Drive and fired 32 shots. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but it was determined that only one would be fatal

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered Apartment 4 at 3003 Springfield Drive and fired 32 shots. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but it was determined that only one would be fatal

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls showed in an evidence photo from Taylor's apartment after she was shot

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls showed in an evidence photo from Taylor's apartment after she was shot

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls showed in an evidence photo from Taylor’s apartment after she was shot

Taylor's living room was full of bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

Taylor's living room was full of bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

Taylor’s living room was full of bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

Previous reports had said Taylor was asleep in bed when officers raided and opened fire.

It also confirmed that police were indeed knocking after serving a warrant in Apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive in the early hours of March 13.

According to the researchers’ findings, Taylor was shot a total of six times, but medical evidence indicated that just one shot was fatal.

“Further medical evidence shows that Ms. Taylor would have been killed by the fatal shot within seconds to two minutes of being struck,” Cameron said.

Determined to have shot the first round, Walker hit Sgt Mattingly in the leg.

Mattingly was the only officer to enter the apartment, where he said he found Walker with a gun.

In his statement [Mattingly] “Says the man was holding a gun with outstretched arms in a firing pose,” Cameron said.

“Sergeant Mattingly saw the man’s gunfire, heard a thump, and immediately knew he had been shot because he felt warmth in his thigh.”

The allegations come from Hankison's bullets traveling to a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Above are the bullet holes in Taylor's apartment

The allegations come from Hankison's bullets traveling to a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Above are the bullet holes in Taylor's apartment

The allegations come from Hankison’s bullets traveling to a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Above are the bullet holes in Taylor’s apartment

Crime scene photos of the investigation show several grenades in and near the EMT's apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13.

Crime scene photos of the investigation show several grenades in and near the EMT's apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13.

Crime scene photos of the investigation show several grenades in and near the EMT’s apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13.

Cameron confirmed that Walker had shot Mattingly in the leg and there was no evidence that the officer was hit by other officers’ own fire.

During the shooting, Mattingly fired six shots, Cosgrove shot sixteen, and Hankinson shot ten, according to the report.

Walker also previously admitted firing one shot and firing first.

Sergeant Mattingly returned fire down the hall. Mattingly fired six shots. Almost simultaneously, Detective Cosgrove also in the doorway, shot 16 times. This all happened in seconds, ”Cameron said. “Six bullets in all hit Mrs. Taylor.”

Meanwhile, Detective Hankison, who was the only cop charged in the case, had fired his weapon ten times, including through a sliding glass door on the outside and through a bedroom window.

“Some of the bullets went through apartment 4 and into apartment 3 before some left that apartment,” Cameron said.

At the time there were three residents of apartment 3 at home, including a man, a pregnant woman and a child.

“There’s no conclusive evidence that bullets fired with Detective Hankison’s weapon hit Mrs. Taylor,” Cameron said.

The AG said the initial ballistics reports could not determine which of the three officers fired the shot that killed Taylor.

Cameron then ordered the FBI Crime Lab to conduct a separate analysis to see if they achieved the same results.

Ballistic analysis concluded that the deadly shot was fired by Detective Cosgrove.

Our agents looked at both reports to determine if there were significant differences in the procedures used by each lab that would have enabled the FBI to identify who fired the deadly shot.

Both law enforcement agencies used similar equipment and analysis. Each laboratory is highly respected for their work.

“There was nothing our investigators could point to, nor anything provided by the respective agencies that directly explains why one lab called and the other didn’t,” Cameron said.

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