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Brave parents left their three children with relatives to protect them during the corona virus

Brave nursing couple working on the frontline of the coronavirus pandemic make a heartbreaking decision to separate from their three children – and they have no idea when they will see them again

  • Irene Hall, 37, and her husband John, 49, live in Fremantle, Western Australia
  • They are currently working as nurses on the front lines of coronavirus disease
  • Parents of a 13-, 11- and 9-year-old were concerned to pass it on
  • That is why they have decided to leave their children with their grandparents for the time being
  • It is not known how long COVID-19 lasts and can last up to six months
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Parents who work in health care have made the difficult decision to divorce their children for the ‘near future’ to avoid passing the coronavirus to their loved ones.

Irene Hall, 37, and her husband John, 49, are based in Fremantle, Western Australia, where there have been 340 confirmed cases of the virus since early March and two people have died.

Irene is registered as a day surgery nurse at Fremantle Hospital, while John is a clinical nurse specialist in mental health.

“John and I have just said goodbye to our beautiful children in the near future,” Irene wrote on Facebook on Monday.

Irene Hall, 37, and her husband John, 49, are based in Fremantle, Western Australia, where there have been 340 confirmed cases of the virus since early March and two people have died (shown with their three children)

Irene Hall, 37, and her husband John, 49, are based in Fremantle, Western Australia, where there have been 340 confirmed cases of the virus since early March and two people have died (shown with their three children)

“They now live in self-locking with their grandparents.

“Since we were both in health, we made the very difficult decision that, in order to protect them all, we should stop coming home from work and potentially expose them and my parents.”

Irene described the situation as “very difficult” and tears were shared after making the choice, but in the end they know this is the right one for them.

“We will miss you, but luckily we have technology,” she said.

Irene confirmed to FEMAIL that she is not normally a person who shares intimate details about her life on social media.

“But I decided to do that as an example for others to show what it takes to get through this,” she said.

Her children - who are 13, 11, and nine years old - `` fully understand '' why they can't see their parents even if it only takes six months

Her children - who are 13, 11, and nine years old - `` fully understand '' why they can't see their parents even if it only takes six months

Her children – who are 13, 11, and nine years old – “ fully understand ” why they can’t see their parents even if it only takes six months

Her children – who are 13, 11, and nine years old – “fully understand” why they can’t see their parents, even if it only takes six months.

‘The most important message for me is: do everything you can to insulate. Times will be tough, and I know the media is scared sometimes, but you just can’t ignore what’s going on with this in the rest of the world, ”she said.

“We’ll get through this together.”

Others online agree with the Hall family’s isolation measures, saying they are considering or have done the same themselves.

“Right decision, damn hard, this is my last morning with my partner,” said one woman.

Coronavirus symptoms and how it spreads:

Coronavirus symptoms

Symptoms can range from mild illness to pneumonia. Some people will recover easily and others can get very sick very quickly. People with coronavirus may experience:

  • fever
  • flu-like symptoms such as coughing, sore throat and fatigue
  • shortness of breath

How it spreads

There is some evidence that the virus is spreading from person to person. The virus is likely to spread through:

  • close contact with an infectious person
  • contact with drops from an infected person’s cough or sneeze
  • touching objects or surfaces (such as doorknobs or tables) that have an infected person’s cough or sneeze droplets, and then touch your mouth or face

How you can prevent this

Everyone must practice good hygiene to protect themselves against infections. Good hygiene means:

  • wash hands often with soap and water
  • use a tissue and cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze
  • avoid close contact with others, such as touching

“I’ve been traveling every weekend for six years to be with him. But with restrictions coming into effect on Tuesday, we won’t be able to see each other again, very sad, but we both think it’s best. The sooner we kneel, do the right thing, the sooner this will be over. ‘

“I was isolated from my two-year-old for a week while we switched from grandparent care to my care as a school teacher. It was so hard, but I can’t imagine I’m a health worker, you guys are great, “said another.

A third added: “A very difficult decision and a great deal of us will have to make. Stay safe’.

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