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The advanced device is equipped with a camera at the end of an articulated arm (chapter one). It uses infrared tracking technology and automatically changes position when the surgeon moves to give the best possible picture (part two). The images are then forwarded to a 55-inch 4K resolution screen (part three), so that everyone in the theater can see what's going on
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Brain surgeons get & # 39; HD TV & # 39; vision because they perform complex procedures in the skull – thanks to a new robotic & # 39; cameraman & # 39; sitting next to them in the operating room and filming their movements.

The advanced device has a camera at the end of an articulated arm. It uses infrared tracking technology and automatically changes position when the surgeon moves, for the best possible image. The images are then forwarded to a 55-inch 4K resolution screen so that everyone in the theater can see what's going on.

The robot has already helped media beds at The Royal London Hospital repair a blood vessel in the brain of a 57-year-old patient who was at risk of bursting and could have died. Hasibe Behjet, from Hackney, East London, became the first person in the UK to undergo the operation last month using the groundbreaking device.

The advanced device is equipped with a camera at the end of an articulated arm (chapter one). It uses infrared tracking technology and automatically changes position when the surgeon moves to give the best possible picture (part two). The images are then forwarded to a 55-inch 4K resolution screen (part three), so that everyone in the theater can see what's going on

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The advanced device is equipped with a camera at the end of an articulated arm (chapter one). It uses infrared tracking technology and automatically changes position when the surgeon moves to give the best possible picture (part two). The images are then forwarded to a 55-inch 4K resolution screen (part three), so that everyone in the theater can see what's going on

Neurosurgeon Christopher Uff said the new technology made the complicated procedure safer and more accurate. & # 39; She recovered remarkably well & # 39 ;, he added. & # 39; She jumped out of bed early the next day, ran over to me and hugged me – and went home after three days. & # 39;

Brain aneurysms are relatively common and have an estimated 30 people. They are caused by a weakness in the wall of a blood vessel that causes it to swell like a balloon. It is unclear why this happens, but people with a history of smoking and high blood pressure run an increased risk of developing one.

Aneurysms are usually small and completely harmless. However, as someone gets bigger, they are more likely to tear and bleed in the skull – a life-threatening condition called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. About half of the patients who suffer from it die and only one in six people who survive will recover their former health.

Surgery, which cuts off the artery on which the bulge is formed, can provide a lifeline for some people with a high-risk brain aneurysm. If the blood cannot penetrate the aneurysm, it cannot tear and bleed into the brain.

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Brain aneurysms are usually located in the skull base and surgeons must act carefully to prevent them from hitting the brain.

The two-hour operation is performed under a general anesthetic. A small incision is made in the hairline, exposing part of the skull on the top of the head. Surgeons then use a drill and other tools to create a small & # 39; trap door & # 39; in the bone, giving them access to the brain – and finding and cutting the affected arteries.

The robot has already helped doctors at the Royal London Hospital (photo) repaired a blood vessel in the brain of a 57-year-old patient who was at risk of bursting and could have died

The robot has already helped doctors at the Royal London Hospital (photo) repaired a blood vessel in the brain of a 57-year-old patient who was at risk of bursting and could have died

The robot has already helped doctors at the Royal London Hospital (photo) repaired a blood vessel in the brain of a 57-year-old patient who was at risk of bursting and could have died

Uff and his team at The Royal London were the first in Europe to use a new robot called Modus V to perform the procedure.

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Previously, in order to see enough detail to perform the complicated movements, surgeons had to peer through a microscope while they were operating. & # 39; But this often meant that you had to get into an exceptionally uncomfortable position & # 39 ;, Mr. Uff explained.

Medics assisting the operation would only be able to view images that were beamed from the microscope to a small, low-resolution screen. But with Mode V, the camera floats above the surgeon on the robot arm. It follows special markings on the surgical instruments and moves automatically to get the best possible view of the brain.

The HD images are projected on the large screen, making it easier for the entire team to respond if something goes wrong.

& # 39; We could see some brain angles that I have never seen before & # 39 ;, Mr. Uff added.

& # 39; The improved image quality is like the difference between watching binoculars and a wide-screen HD TV. & # 39;

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He hopes to use the robot to perform the procedure for more patients.

Mrs. Behjet, who is still recovering from her operation at home, said: & it was great to be the first to take advantage of this new equipment. Mr. Uff and his team were very nice and explained everything so clearly. & # 39;

Try this: The more mobile hips with a handrail

From Mariam Al-Roubi

In recent weeks we have looked at different types of squat exercises and how they can increase strength, stability and mobility.

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This week the emphasis is on the hips. Do the following exercise once a day as part of a ten to 15 minute stretch routine and you will soon feel more flexible.

Perform the following exercise once (photo) every day as part of a ten to 15 minute stretch routine and you will quickly feel more agile

Perform the following exercise once (photo) every day as part of a ten to 15 minute stretch routine and you will quickly feel more agile

Perform the following exercise once (photo) every day as part of a ten to 15 minute stretch routine and you will quickly feel more agile

  • Stand at the foot of a staircase and hold onto the handrail – the feet slightly wider than the hips, the toes slightly outward.
  • Now lower your weight slightly to the back so that you can pull on the handrail, push your hips back and fall into a deep squat – a bit like a sumo wrestler – pointing with your knees.
  • Try to get your hips as close to the floor as possible with your hands along the back. Then use the balustrade for stability and assistance as often as you need and return to the starting position.
  • Repeat this ten times, or until you are tired.

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