Boy, 6, almost dies from streptococcal infection that became deadly sepsis

A six-year-old boy in Texas almost died of a streptococcal infection after his pediatrician rejected his condition as a virus.

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Hunter Barker, from Arlington, woke up on a Monday morning in April with a headache and a slight fever of 99.1 f. His fever rose to 104f within 24 hours.

His mother, Rachel Barker, called his doctor, who told her it was likely a virus that would soon pass, reported NBC 5.

But when Hunter started vomiting and got a rash a few days later, she rushed him to the hospital.

It was there that doctors discovered that he had an untreated streptococcal infection that had turned into sepsis, a life-threatening infection that occurs when the body attacks its own organs and tissues.

His parents were told that if they had waited another day for medical help, Hunter could have died.

Hunter Barker, six, from Arlington, Texas, began complaining about headache and fever in April. Pictured: Hunter in the hospital with his mother

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Hunter Barker, six, from Arlington, Texas, began complaining about headache and fever in April. Pictured: Hunter in the hospital with his mother

His pediatrician told his mother that he probably had contracted a virus that would disappear. Pictured: Hunter

His pediatrician told his mother that he probably had contracted a virus that would disappear. Pictured: Hunter

After Hunter developed a (photo) rash and started vomiting a few days later, his mother took him to the hospital, where he was rushed to intensive care

After Hunter developed a (photo) rash and started vomiting a few days later, his mother took him to the hospital, where he was rushed to intensive care

His pediatrician told his mother that he probably had contracted a virus that would disappear. After Hunter (left and right) developed a rash and started vomiting a few days later, his mother took him to the hospital, where he was rushed to intensive care

Barker told NBC 5 that when Hunter first started complaining about headache and fever, she didn't think it was serious.

& # 39; He woke up Monday and said: & # 39; I have a headache & # 39; and I thought: & # 39; It's Monday. We all have a headache. No one wants to go to school & she said.

However, when he got a rash and started vomiting, she turned to Dr. Google.

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& # 39; I remember thinking, "What is that?" Barker said about his result.

& # 39; Google, your best and worst friend, reminded me it was broken (blood vessels) from vomiting. I thought, "Well, that made sense". & # 39;

She decided to take Hunter to Cook Children & # 39; s Medical Center in Fort Worth to be checked when his condition suddenly got worse.

& # 39; When we entered there, a paramedic asked: & # 39; When did his lips turn purple? & # 39 ;, Barker said to NBC 5.

& # 39; And then I just froze. I thought: "It wasn't like that yet and we just got out of the car". & # 39;

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He was rushed to the ICU, where doctors diagnosed him with group A streptococcal infection.

They told Barker that because Hunter had not been treated for the infection, he had developed sepsis.

Doctors diagnosed Hunter with a group A infection, which had become sepsis because it had not been treated. Pictured: Hunter in the hospital

Doctors diagnosed Hunter with a group A infection, which had become sepsis because it had not been treated. Pictured: Hunter in the hospital

Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that occurs when the body attacks its own organs and tissues. Pictured: Hunter in the hospital

Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that occurs when the body attacks its own organs and tissues. Pictured: Hunter in the hospital

Doctors diagnosed Hunter with a group A infection, which had become sepsis because it had not been treated. Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that occurs when the body attacks its own organs and tissues. Pictured, left and right: Hunter in the hospital

Hunter was fired after two and a half weeks and even got a ride home from the Arlington Fire Department (photo)
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Hunter was fired after two and a half weeks and even got a ride home from the Arlington Fire Department (photo)

Hunter was fired after two and a half weeks and even got a ride home from the Arlington Fire Department (photo)

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition where chemicals released by the immune system into the bloodstream to fight an infection cause inflammation throughout the body instead.

Many doctors consider sepsis in three phases, ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and ultimately septic shock, a dramatic drop in blood pressure that stops blood flow to the organs and can result in death.

Symptoms, which can last for a few days, are fever, lower abdominal pain, chills, pale skin, headache and increased heart rate.

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According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1.7 million Americans develop sepsis each year, killing at least 270,000 people.

For the treatment of sepsis, patients receive doses of IV fluids and vasopressors, drugs that narrow blood vessels and raise blood pressure.

According to NBC 5, Hunter responded well to treatment and went home after spending two and a half weeks in the hospital.

Barker says she wants to assure other parents never to be afraid of bombarding their children's doctors with questions.

& # 39; Ask questions! Ask the questions I didn't ask. What if I had asked for a chest x-ray? We had known before, & she told NBC 5.

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