Bovis Homes faces protests over plans to build a farm of 137 houses over the Roman villa

Housing developer Bovis Homes faces protests over plans to build an estate of 137 houses over a Roman villa & # 39; exceptional & # 39; 2,000 years old

  • The "important discovery" was made by archaeologists in Cam, Gloucestershire
  • Underfloor heating system, circular bathroom, plaster and decorated tiles.
  • Bovis Homes has planning permission to build a farm of 137 houses at the top of the site
  • Housing firm angered the locals by insisting that the villa does not qualify for preservation

A housing developer faces a protest in a picturesque town of Cotswold over plans to build a development on a 2,000-year-old Roman villa.

The "important discovery" was made by archaeologists who worked on behalf of Bovis Homes while digging in Cam, Gloucestershire.

Among the findings are the remains of a radiant floor heating system, a circular bathroom, plaster and decorated tiles.

However, the developer, owner of the land, has angered the locals by insisting that the villa does not qualify for preservation.

Christie McLean has initiated a petition in an attempt to save the site that obtained more than 3,500 signatures within two days after launch.

This Roman villa was discovered by archaeologists who worked on behalf of Bovis Homes while digging in Cam, Gloucestershire.

This Roman villa was discovered by archaeologists who worked on behalf of Bovis Homes while digging in Cam, Gloucestershire.

Bovis Homes faces a protest in a picturesque town of Cotswold over plans to build a development (pictured) over the 2,000-year-old Roman villa.

Bovis Homes faces a protest in a picturesque town of Cotswold over plans to build a development (pictured) over the 2,000-year-old Roman villa.

Bovis Homes faces a protest in a picturesque town of Cotswold over plans to build a development (pictured) over the 2,000-year-old Roman villa.

She told the BBC: & # 39; Everyone is amazed at it. There are some historical landmarks around here, but nothing so obvious.

"We look forward to the request and more voices that (Bovis) can adjust their current plans."

The BBC's presenter and archeology expert, Professor Mark Horton, described the site as "a very important discovery."

But he said protesters had limited options because Bovis had full planning permission to build on the site.

Historic England could visit the village to inspect its remains, which could eventually lead to a recommendation to the secretary of state, however, this would mean paying compensation to Bovis.

A spokeswoman for Bovis Homes said: & # 39; Archaeological research is a key part of new construction developments and we are proud to fund this work to discover more about Cam's history as we build for the future.

"The archaeologists who carry out this work inform the county council and regularly update us and the Stroud district council about progress, recording and eliminating artifacts, and detailing the findings they make."

Among the findings are the remains of a radiant floor heating system, a circular bathroom, plaster and decorated tiles

Among the findings are the remains of a radiant floor heating system, a circular bathroom, plaster and decorated tiles

Among the findings are the remains of a radiant floor heating system, a circular bathroom, plaster and decorated tiles

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