Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora scams President Trump for tweets

Alex Cora with Boston Red Sox executive Dave Dombrowski holding a Puerto Rican flag at Cora's presentation as the club's new manager in November 2017

Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora harshly criticized President Donald Trump for contesting the death toll from Hurricane Maria and called his actions "disrespectful."

As the first anniversary of Hurricane Maria approaches, Cora, 42, said she respected the president but did not agree with the two tweets she wrote on Thursday morning.

Trump turned to social media, claiming that "3,000 people did not die" as a result of the storm and denouncing the Democrats for inflating the death toll that hurt him.

In his first tweet, Trump ranted: 3,000 people did not die in the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico. When I left the island, AFTER the storm had hit, they had between 6 and 18 deaths. With the passage of time, it did not rise too much. Then, a long time later, they started reporting really big numbers, like 3000 … & # 39;

Alex Cora with Boston Red Sox executive Dave Dombrowski holding a Puerto Rican flag at Cora's presentation as the club's new manager in November 2017

Alex Cora with Boston Red Sox executive Dave Dombrowski holding a Puerto Rican flag at Cora's presentation as the club's new manager in November 2017

Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora was not satisfied with the latest comments from President Donald Trump, minimizing the death toll from Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora was not satisfied with the latest comments from President Donald Trump, minimizing the death toll from Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora was not satisfied with the latest comments from President Donald Trump, minimizing the death toll from Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Early on Thursday Trump expressed on Twitter that the 3,000 were inflated and exaggerated

Early on Thursday Trump expressed on Twitter that the 3,000 were inflated and exaggerated

Early on Thursday Trump expressed on Twitter that the 3,000 were inflated and exaggerated

He stated that the exaggeration was designed by the Democrats to portray the president in a bad light after Hurricanes Maria and Irma.

He stated that the exaggeration was designed by the Democrats to portray the president in a bad light after Hurricanes Maria and Irma.

He stated that the exaggeration was designed by the Democrats to portray the president in a bad light after Hurricanes Maria and Irma.

Cora said before last night's game in Boston: "Tweeting some 3,000 people and being efficient, it's really disrespectful for my country, we see it that way, I know he probably does not feel that way.

"And as I said, hello, friend, thanks for helping us, he went down there, did what he did, I hate talking about politics and all that, but I think this is more than politics.

Cora was part of a contingent of representatives of the Red Sox who visited their hometown of Caguas in January to help with relief efforts.

"This is a country that really suffered, we still see that hurricanes are forming now." Everyone is in a panic. Is not easy. One thing is for sure, and I told you before, one thing I'm proud of is that we're standing with our own feet, "said Cora.

I like it, do we need help? If we do it. We know. But we have been fighting through that. We are not where we were, but we will be there. And it's only a matter of time. "

Alex Cora participated in the hurricane relief campaign organized by the Boston Red Sox. The team flew to Caguas, Puerto Rico in January

Alex Cora participated in the hurricane relief campaign organized by the Boston Red Sox. The team flew to Caguas, Puerto Rico in January

Alex Cora participated in the hurricane relief campaign organized by the Boston Red Sox. The team flew to Caguas, Puerto Rico in January

Alex Cora, the second manager born in Puerto Rico in the Major Leagues, hugs his daughter Camila during the Red Sox relief trip in January to Puerto Rico

Alex Cora, the second manager born in Puerto Rico in the Major Leagues, hugs his daughter Camila during the Red Sox relief trip in January to Puerto Rico

Alex Cora, the second manager born in Puerto Rico in the Major Leagues, hugs his daughter Camila during the Red Sox relief trip in January to Puerto Rico

The city of San Isidro, Puerto Rico, weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall for the first time and hit the island

The city of San Isidro, Puerto Rico, weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall for the first time and hit the island

The city of San Isidro, Puerto Rico, weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall for the first time and hit the island

Cora, the only Puerto Rican who currently drives in the Major Leagues and the second in baseball history, has grown tired of Trump's controversial take on the devastating hurricane that destroyed his native island when he made landfall on September 16, 2017, only One week after being hit by Hurricane Irma.

The storms knocked out all the electricity on the Caribbean island.

"But it's a bit frustrating that the issue keeps coming and going, what's the point, honestly, and I respect him, he's the president of the United States, but I do not agree with a lot of things he says about us," he said.

In another tweet, Trump accused the Democratic Party of inflating the official death toll from Hurricane Maria.

& # 39; … This was done by the Democrats to make me look as bad as possible when I was successfully raising billions of dollars to help rebuild Puerto Rico. If a person died for any reason, such as old age, simply add it to the list. Bad policy I love Puerto Rico! Trump wrote.

In January, the Boston Red Sox organization loaded a plane with products and flew to Caguas, the hometown of Alex Cora (second from right) to deliver donations to the devastated island.

In January, the Boston Red Sox organization loaded a plane with products and flew to Caguas, the hometown of Alex Cora (second from right) to deliver donations to the devastated island.

In January, the Boston Red Sox organization loaded a plane with products and flew to Caguas, the hometown of Alex Cora (second from right) to deliver donations to the devastated island.

The Puerto Ricans had to leave the rubble in the wake of Hurricane Maria last year in dangerous conditions after losing power, running water and cell phone service

The Puerto Ricans had to leave the rubble in the wake of Hurricane Maria last year in dangerous conditions after losing power, running water and cell phone service

The Puerto Ricans had to leave the rubble in the wake of Hurricane Maria last year in dangerous conditions after losing power, running water and cell phone service

The total number of deaths increased from 64 to 2,975 after an independent study conducted by researchers at the School of Public Health of the Milken Institute at George Washington University discovered that the number of people who died after was severely underestimated.

Earlier this week, President Trump was beaten by the governor of Puerto Rico, Ricardo Rosselló, and the mayor of San Juan, Carmen Yulin, after the president said the federal government did a "fantastic job in Puerto Rico." .

You know, 3,000, 6, 18, I do not know. We will never know how many we lost. I hate that people are making a political problem [of it]", Added Cora on Thursday night.

"This is about human beings and the people who went through their, know what happens."

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