WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Boris Johnson’s drive to return to imperial measurements is branded as ‘nonsense’ by Asda chairman

Plans to bring back imperial readings have been labeled “complete and utter nonsense” by Asda chairman Lord Rose of Monewden, who accused the government of appealing to a “small minority listening to the past”.

The Conservative colleague’s comments come as the government launches a consultation on the extent to which Britain should adopt imperial measures – such as pounds and ounces – after leaving the EU.

The plans, which coincide with the Queen’s platinum anniversary, will also tell cafe owners they can serve pints in glasses adorned with a crown.

Plans to bring back Imperial readings have been labeled 'complete and utter nonsense' by Asda chairman Lord Rose of Monewden (pictured)

Plans to bring back Imperial readings have been labeled ‘complete and utter nonsense’ by Asda chairman Lord Rose of Monewden (pictured)

It has been argued that the previous EU requirement for a ‘CE’ marking, introduced in 2004, actually resulted in the removal of the symbol from pint glasses.

The move back to imperial standards, which the UK moved away from under EU rules, has been welcomed by Brexiteers.

But industry groups have warned that new laws to change the way the UK measures food and drink could push already skyrocketing prices further.

They expressed fears that this could exacerbate the cost of living crisis, due to the cost of having to relabel products.

Speaking of the move, Lord Rose, a former chairman of Marks & Spencer, told: Time Radio: ‘I’ve never heard such nonsense in my life. I mean, we’ve got serious problems in the world and we’re saying now let’s go backwards.

‘Does anyone in this country under 40 know how many ounces are in a pound?

The government is launching a consultation on the extent to which Britain should adopt imperial measures - such as pounds and ounces - after leaving the EU.  In the photo: Boris Johnson

The government is launching a consultation on the extent to which Britain should adopt imperial measures – such as pounds and ounces – after leaving the EU. In the photo: Boris Johnson

‘Shall we go to the supermarket and say, ‘I’d like a pound and a half’, or ‘A pound, four ounces’ of this or that? We’re just doing it to please a small minority of people who listen to the past.”

He added: ‘I am shocked. It’s one thing to have a crown on your pint glass, it’s a bit of fun and a bit of nostalgia. It’s not like you have a very dual system of weights and measures.’

While the government said: ‘It is not the intention to force companies to change their existing practices and so this will not lead to increased costs for companies.’

Earlier this week, Tory MPs turned red when they were unable to quantify certain imperial measures.

When questioned on Sky News about us, pound and pint, Conservative colleague Lord Parkinson gave only one correct answer.

Lord Parkinson suggested that there are 14 ounces in a pound when there are 16.

The plans, which coincide with the Queen's platinum anniversary, will also tell cafe owners they can serve pints in glasses adorned with a crown.

The plans, which coincide with the Queen’s platinum anniversary, will also tell cafe owners they can serve pints in glasses adorned with a crown.

He also failed to convert a pound of sausage to grams and offered an answer of 250 g. One pound is about 450 grams.

However, the former aide to ex-Prime Minister Theresa May correctly stated that three liters is more than four pints.

Asda chairman Lord Rose is not alone in expressing his dismay at the adoption of imperial measures, with some fearing it could exacerbate the cost of living crisis.

Andrea Martinez-Inchausti, deputy director of food at the British Retail Consortium, said: “Introducing new laws to change the way we measure food and drink would both distract from this vital task and increase costs and complexity if existing products need to be relabelled.’

The BRC also pointed out that manufacturers and retailers already have the freedom to list imperial measures in addition to metric measures.

While Joe Harrison, the director of the National Market Traders Federation, questioned whether a return to imperial measures would be “beneficial.”

It comes after Tory MPs turned red this week when Conservative colleague Lord Parkinson (pictured) was unable to quantify certain Imperial measures when questioned on Sky News

It comes after Tory MPs turned red this week when Conservative colleague Lord Parkinson (pictured) was unable to quantify certain Imperial measures when questioned on Sky News

He told the Daily Telegraph that the move would be a “hassle” and suggested most members of the public would no longer operate on Imperial measurements.

And the Chartered Trading Standards Institute warned against any move that would “stun” the public.

Chief executive John Herriman said: “At a time when consumers and businesses are already bearing the brunt of higher prices and inflation, it’s really important that any proposed measures don’t fool the public about value for money and everyday prices. articles. or add unnecessary costs and confusion to business.

The reintroduction of imperial measures would require significant and sustained investment in metrology, additions to the national curriculum and a campaign to educate the general public.

“At a time when the vast majority of the rest of the world is working metrically, it also seems counter-intuitive to go back to imperial measures as we trade with a larger number of international countries like Global Britain after leaving the EU.” . †

But government minister Chris Philp this week touted a return to imperial measures as ‘leaving a bit of our national culture and heritage back on the shelves’.

Industry groups have warned that new laws to change the way the UK measures food and drink could push already skyrocketing prices further

Industry groups have warned that new laws to change the way the UK measures food and drink could push already skyrocketing prices further

However, the plans are not universally popular among Tory MPs.

Alicia Kearns, MP for Rutland and Melton, described the proposals as “nonsense” and disputed whether they were a “Brexit freedom”.

She said, “No voter has ever asked for this.”

Tobias Ellwood, the chairman of the House of Commons Defense Committee and a critic of the Prime Minister, claimed that Mr Johnson’s plans were “trying to support voters and drive part of the electorate away”.

“There will be people in our party who like this nostalgic policy in the hope that it will be enough to win the next election,” he told Sky News.

‘But that is not the case. This is not one nation conservative thinking that is needed to appeal to outside of our base.

“It’s far from the inspiring, visionary forward thinking we need. And it fits into a pattern that I fear will see more and more micro-announcements thrown out, which in fact sows further discontent among more MPs.’

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More