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Boris Johnson (photo) is set to ask the queen to suspend parliament a few weeks before Brexit, in a movement that can prevent MPs from blocking a No Deal Brexit

Boris Johnson plans to ask the queen to suspend parliament a few weeks before Brexit.

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According to prorogation plans to be approved by Balmoral today, MPs are reported not to sit between September 9 and a speech by the Queen on October 14.

That gives MPs extremely little time to prevent a No Deal Brexit on 31 October, despite the parties' efforts to pass legislation to do so.

The government insists that the move is a normal procedural step and called it a & # 39; standard standard Queen & # 39; s Speech & # 39; process, but Mr. Johnson's opponents immediately called it a & # 39; dark day for British democracy & # 39; and called him a & # 39; tinpot dictator & # 39 ;.

The Prime Minister has repeatedly promised that the UK will leave the European Union on 31 October, with or without agreement.

Boris Johnson (photo) is set to ask the queen to suspend parliament a few weeks before Brexit, in a movement that can prevent MPs from blocking a No Deal Brexit

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Boris Johnson (photo) is set to ask the queen to suspend parliament a few weeks before Brexit, in a movement that can prevent MPs from blocking a No Deal Brexit

The prime minister will ask the sovereign (pictured together on the day he was appointed prime minister last month) for parliament in September

The prime minister will ask the sovereign (pictured together on the day he was appointed prime minister last month) for parliament in September

The prime minister will ask the sovereign (pictured together on the day he was appointed prime minister last month) for parliament in September

What is happening now with the Brexit process in Parliament?

Today: Privy Councilors including Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Lord President of the Council, will see the Queen in Balmoral, it is reported.

They will ask her to prorogenize parliament from September 9.

September 3: Parliament is returning from its summer break as planned.

September 9th: If the latest plans continue, Parliament will be suspended again from this date.

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Late September – early October: Festive conference season. Workers gather in Brighton while the Tories are in Manchester.

14 October: MPs return to parliament and a speech is given in which the king reads the government's legislative plans.

Opposition members can start with efforts to stop a No Deal Brexit, but the time will be extremely limited.

October 31st: Great Britain will leave the European Union on this date. Boris Johnson has promised that on October 31 it will happen with or without a deal.

November: It is speculated that the government will hold a general election after the Brexit crosses the line.

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Talks between parties led by Jeremy Corbyn of Labor ended yesterday in a pledge to stop a No Deal Brexit with new legislation.

That would require opposition MPs to take over control of parliamentary affairs – an unusual step, but it already happened during the Brexit process.

However, MPs cannot pass legislation if they are not sitting and the move to suspend Parliament will be seen as an attempt to thwart opposition plans.

According to previous plans, Commons business was cut off for the party conference season before MPs returned. The Tory conference ends on October 2.

Now the time will be even shorter – and the splendor of the Queen's speech and the opening of Parliament will use up part of that time.

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Jacob Rees-Mogg will be one of the Privy Councilors asking the queen to stamp the plans in Balmoral today, it is reported.

The parliamentary session will then be announced only a few days after the return of the parliamentarians from their summer recess.

Today Mr Johnson's opponents accused him of a & # 39; constitutional indignation & # 39; to prevent Parliament from stopping him.

Scotland's Prime Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, said: & # 39; So it seems that Boris Johnson is about to close parliament to enforce a no-Brexit.

Jacob Rees-Mogg (photo) will join Privy Councilors and ask the queen to preach parliament

Jacob Rees-Mogg (photo) will join Privy Councilors and ask the queen to preach parliament

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Jacob Rees-Mogg (photo) will join Privy Councilors and ask the queen to preach parliament

How can MPs take control of the House of Commons and approve an anti-No Deal law?

Opposition leaders' plan to take control of the House of Commons to adopt an anti-No Deal law is likely to depend on John Bercow to get off the ground.

Convention dictates that it is the government of the day that sets the agenda in the Commons.

So if the others want to start their plan, they need the Commons Speaker to bend or break the rules.

Their plan will probably then start with a simple vote on whether there is a majority of MPs for backbenchers who take control of the order paper.

Assuming MPs will agree on a date in the diary on which they will be able to present, debate and vote on draft legislation to prevent Boris Johnson from bringing the UK out of the EU without an agreement.

The government will fiercely combat such a move, but with Mr Johnson's majority now only one, only a small rebellion from the members of Tory Europhile is needed for the plan to go ahead.

Should the bid to approve a law actually come about, the question is whether the prime minister will take note of this.

It has been suggested in the past that he could simply ignore such a move.

But if he did, he would risk an unprecedented constitutional crisis.

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& # 39; Unless MPs stop him next week, today is going down as a dark one indeed for British democracy & # 39 ;.

Labor MP and former Foreign Minister Yvette Cooper tweeted: & Boris Johnson is trying to use the Queen to concentrate power in his own hands – this is an extremely dangerous and irresponsible way to rule. & # 39;

Green MP Caroline Lucas said on Twitter: & # 39; Wasn't this meant to & # 39; take control back & # 39 ;?

& # 39; The act of a cowardly prime minister who knows his reckless No Deal Brexit never gets the support of MPs. A constitutional outrage that Parliament and the population will oppose. & # 39;

Independent MEP Chris Leslie said: & # 39; If it is true, this undemocratic maneuver to try to close Parliament must be fought at every step.

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& # 39; How totally left behind by Boris Johnson to have the queen sign this plot during a secret ceremony in Balmoral. The lower house must compile and veto this. & # 39;

However, a source of number 10 told BBC News that & # 39; this is about the NHS and violent crime, not about Brexit, and the courts have no locus to get involved in a standard Queen & # 39; s Speech process & # 39 ;

Tory party chairman James Cleverly endorsed that interpretation by tweeting: & # 39; Or, to put it another way, the government to make a speech from the queen, just like all new governments. & # 39;

The cross-party movement had promised to concentrate on the adoption of new legislation when the Commons returned from its summer vacation on 3 September.

Mr. Corbyn confirmed that he would not immediately proceed with an attempt to replace Mr. Johnson with a vote of no confidence.

John McDonnell and Ian Blackford, flanked by Caroline Lucas and Jo Swinson, pose for a photo before they take the & # 39; Church House Declaration & # 39; sign that promises to resist any attempt at prorogue Parliament
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John McDonnell and Ian Blackford, flanked by Caroline Lucas and Jo Swinson, pose for a photo before they take the & # 39; Church House Declaration & # 39; sign that promises to resist any attempt at prorogue Parliament

John McDonnell and Ian Blackford, flanked by Caroline Lucas and Jo Swinson, pose for a photo before they take the & # 39; Church House Declaration & # 39; sign that promises to resist any attempt at prorogue Parliament

British Green Party MP Caroline Lucas (L), leader of British liberal democrats Jo Swinson (2L), Plaid Cymru Westminster leader Liz Saville Roberts (2R) and SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford (r) during the Church House meeting on preventing a No Deal Brexit

British Green Party MP Caroline Lucas (L), leader of British liberal democrats Jo Swinson (2L), Plaid Cymru Westminster leader Liz Saville Roberts (2R) and SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford (r) during the Church House meeting on preventing a No Deal Brexit

British Green Party MP Caroline Lucas (L), leader of British liberal democrats Jo Swinson (2L), Plaid Cymru Westminster leader Liz Saville Roberts (2R) and SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford (r) during the Church House meeting on preventing a No Deal Brexit

That idea had been resisted because of his plan to lead a government.

Other opposition figures had called for a compromise candidate who would rather have a cross-party Commons majority as an interim prime minister.

Europhile Tory grandee Ken Clarke and laboratory technician Harriet Harman were among the names mentioned.

The meeting was attended yesterday by Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson, SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford, Independent Group for Change leader Anna Soubry, Plaid Cymru leader Liz Saville Roberts and Green Party MP Caroline Lucas.

Last night mr. Corbyn made an extraordinary plea to dozens of Tory MPs to encourage them to defy their leader.

His letter – to 116 Tory and independent MPs, including Theresa May and Philip Hammond – asked them to support efforts to block a No Deal Brexit.

The plan to take control of the lower house would probably need help from Commons Speaker John Bercow if it gets off the ground.

(LR) Shadow chief whip Nick Brown, shadow Brexit secretary Sir Kier Starmer, shadow leader of the Lower House Valerie Vaz, Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, prior to meeting senior MPs from all parties to stop a no deal with Brexit

(LR) Shadow chief whip Nick Brown, shadow Brexit secretary Sir Kier Starmer, shadow leader of the Lower House Valerie Vaz, Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, prior to meeting senior MPs from all parties to stop a no deal with Brexit

(LR) Shadow chief whip Nick Brown, shadow Brexit secretary Sir Kier Starmer, shadow leader of the Lower House Valerie Vaz, Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, prior to meeting senior MPs from all parties to stop a no deal with Brexit

MPs will have to find a way to enforce a vote by giving them control over the Commons agenda and that will probably require Mr. Bercow to deviate from the convention to make it possible.

Once a way has been found to show that there is a majority for such a move, MPs will set aside time in the diary to debate and vote on an anti-No Deal law.

To obtain such a majority, a number of Tory MPs have to break the line and vote with the opposition and Mr Corbyn wrote to them yesterday afternoon asking for their help.

MPs previously enforced the so-called Cooper-Letwin Act in April, which forced Prime Minister Theresa May to seek an extension.

That passed with just one vote.

Mr. Johnson's allies have defeated opposition leaders and claim that they would & sabotage the chances of progress with a Brexit deal & # 39 ;.

A source of number 10 said: & # 39; We are making progress now because our European partners realize that we are serious about leaving the EU on 31 October – no ifs, no buts.

& # 39; It is completely perverted that Corbyn and his allies are actively trying to sabotage the position of the UK.

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