Boris Johnson ‘told Joe Biden he hates the term special relationship’ because it’s too ‘needy’

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Boris Johnson told Joe Biden he hates the UK’s relationship with the US being labeled the ‘special relationship’ because it makes Britain look ‘needy’, it was revealed today.

The prime minister made the remark to the new US president in an early appeal after the Democrat was installed in the White House in January.

The claim came in a new profile of Mr Johnson in the American magazine the Atlantic, in which he says “obviously” he is not a populist in the style of Donald Trump.

He also declined to discuss Brexit for the piece, saying: ‘Should we talk about Brexit? We sucked that lemon.”

Assistants to the prime minister told the magazine he had informed the president that he did not like the phrase “special relationship” after Mr Biden used it in one of their first phone calls.

The claim may raise some eyebrows, as the term was popularized in a post-war speech by its political hero, Winston Churchill.

Biden also used it in an article this weekend, ahead of his arrival in Britain this week, where he will meet the Queen and attend the G7 heads of state meeting in Cornwall.

Downing Street confirmed today that Mr Johnson does not like the expression. His official spokesperson said: “He has said earlier in the file that he prefers not to use the expression.

“That does not diminish the importance with which we view our relationship with the US, our closest ally.”

The prime minister made the remark to the new US president in an early appeal after the Democrat was installed in the White House in January.

The prime minister made the remark to the new US president in an early appeal after the Democrat was installed in the White House in January.

Assistants to the prime minister told the magazine he had informed the president that he did not like the phrase

Assistants to the prime minister told the magazine he had informed the president that he did not like the phrase “special relationship” after Mr Biden used it in one of their first phone calls.

The confession may raise some eyebrows, however, as the term was first used by its political hero, Winston Churchill, in a post-war speech.

The confession may raise some eyebrows, however, as the term was first used by its political hero, Winston Churchill, in a post-war speech.

Churchill and the special relationship

The use of the phrase “special relationship” is thought to date back to the 19th century when Britain was the dominant world power and the United States was a growing industrial nation.

But the term was popularized by Winston Churchill when he used it in a historic post-war speech in the US.

The Fulton, Missouri address in March 1946 is best known for using the term “Iron Curtain” to describe Soviet Russia and its Eastern European allies.

But Mr Churchill, who was ousted from Downing Street by Labor last year, used the term to describe the close bond between the US, then the global superpower, and Britain and its Commonwealth allies.

In a speech emphasizing the risks posed by communism in the atomic age, he said: “Neither the sure prevention of war nor the continued rise of world organization will be achieved without what I have called the fraternal association of the Anglophone peoples.” .

‘This signifies a special relationship between the British Commonwealth and Empire and the United States.

“This is no time for generalities, and I venture to be precise. Fraternal association requires not only the growing friendship and mutual understanding between our two vast but related systems of society, but the continuation of the intimate relationship between our military advisers, leading to a common study of potential dangers, the similarity of weapons and manuals. from instructions, and to the exchange of officers and cadets at technical colleges.

“It should entail the continuation of current mutual security facilities through the joint use of all naval and air bases owned by both countries around the world. This would perhaps double the mobility of the US Navy and Air Force. It would vastly increase those of the British Empire’s armed forces and could very well lead to significant financial savings, if and if the world calms down.

‘We already use a large number of islands together; More will probably be entrusted to our collective care in the near future.’

It has since been used repeatedly by leaders of both countries to describe the close political, economic and military cooperation between the two countries, especially during the Cold War.

More recently, however, questions have been raised about how special the relationship remains, with the US under successive leaders shifting its focus west to the indo-pacific region, and the growing threat from communist China.

In 2015, a leaked memo to members of Congress stated that “the UK may not be viewed as centrally relevant to the United States in all issues and relations considered a priority on the US agenda.”

In the extended Atlantic piece — which he was advised not to participate in — Johnson accused people of being “ignorant” if they thought he looked like Donald Trump.

“I’m trying hard to convey to the American public that this is a category mistake that has been made repeatedly,” the prime minister said.

“The point I’m trying to make to you and your readers is that you shouldn’t mistake this government for a bunch of xenophobes or autarkic economic nationalists.”

It came amid reports that Mr Biden plans to warn Boris Johnson not to renege on Northern Ireland’s Brexit arrangements when they hold talks at the G7 this week.

The US president comes to Cornwall for his first foreign trip as the prime minister hosts the face-to-face meeting of world leaders.

But while he vows to confirm ‘the special relationship’ with the UK, Mr Biden is also expected to give a sign of the bickering with the EU over Northern Ireland.

The hard line comes as Brexit minister Lord Frost admitted the government had “underestimated” the impact of the protocol when it signed the deal.

The peer – meeting his EU counterpart this week for final talks on the situation – urged the bloc to give up “legal purism” and recognize that “time is running out” for a way through the to find a deadlock.

Mr Johnson’s deal on Northern Ireland has fueled fears about rising sectarian tensions.

A series of checks on goods at the ports of Belfast and Larne have infuriated unions over barriers to trade with the British mainland.

Writing in the Washington Post before his trip late this week, “In the United Kingdom, after meeting Prime Minister Boris Johnson to reaffirm the special relationship between our nations, I will attend the G7 summit.

This group of leading democracies and economies have not met in person for two years because of the coronavirus.

“Ending this pandemic, improving health security for all countries and driving a robust, inclusive global economic recovery will be our top priorities.”

According to The Times, Mr Biden will also make it clear that he sees the protocol as a crucial part of maintaining peace in Northern Ireland – suggesting that a trade deal with the US would be jeopardized if not upheld.

However, he could also send the message to Brussels that they should be ‘more flexible’ and less ‘bureaucratic’.

Lord Frost said the British government had “underestimated” the impact of the Northern Ireland Protocol, which he helped negotiate as part of the original Brexit deal, on the region.

He has called on the European Union to renounce “legal purism” and instead embrace “pragmatic solutions” to solve the problems associated with the protocol.

The protocol has angered union members by effectively erecting a barrier between Britain and Northern Ireland by keeping the region bound by a set of EU customs and regulatory rules.

Talks between the EU and the UK government are continuing to resolve some of the issues, but many union members have called for it to be scrapped over fears of separating Northern Ireland from the rest of Britain.

In an article for the Financial Times ahead of his meeting this week with European Commission Vice-President Maros Sefcovic in London, Lord Frost called for a change in the bloc’s stance.

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