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Boris Johnson suspended Parliament for five weeks this evening
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Boris Johnson will suspend Parliament this evening for five weeks amid anger over the claims that he might try to sabotage their No Deal law.

Downing Street confirmed that prorogation will take place even if – as expected – the Prime Minister loses his last attempt to force an unexpected election.

Johnson is trying to find a way to bypass rebel legislation and to order him to beg the EU to renew if no agreement is reached on October 19.

One trick that assistants consider involves sending a letter to the Prime Minister asking for an extension – as required by law – but another requesting the block will ignore the request.

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The suggestion has been suppressed by Labor former Lord Chancellor Lord Falconer said that movement could break the law – while former cabinet minister David Gauke said the second letter & # 39; would not carry weight & # 39 ;.

Former Supreme Court Lord Sumption also rejected the idea that sending two conflicting letters to the EU would be legal.

& # 39; No, of course not, & # 39; he said to the Today program of BBC Radio 4.

& # 39; He must not only send the letter, he must request an extension.

& # 39; To send the letter and then try to neutralize it, it seems clear to me that it is a violation of the law.

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& # 39; You must realize that the courts are not so fond of loopholes. & # 39;

Eurosceptics have put pressure on Mr. Johnson – who met this morning the Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar in Dublin – to keep his promise not to delay the departure of the UK.

Some suggested in a private WhatsApp group that he should simply ignore the legislation.

And conservative MP Andrew Bridgen told MailOnline today that it could be an option for Mr. Johnson to become a & # 39; martyr of democracy & # 39; to become.

& # 39; Unfortunately, democracy has an insatiable hunger for martyrs. He could end up being one of those – collateral damage, & he said.

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However, in the light of the threats posed by the government, the Prime Minister informed ministers that he would not openly violate legislation.

Eurosceptics have stepped up pressure on Boris Johnson – pictured at meeting with Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar this morning in Dublin – to keep his promise not to delay the UK's departure from the EU

Johnson squatted yesterday in Chevening, the land residence of the Foreign Minister, with his closest assistants while she was wargamed in the coming days.

The group includes chief strategist Dominic Cummings.

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One plan envisaged to prevent the three-month extension is that the Prime Minister should send a supplementary letter in addition to the request for an extension of Article 50, stating that the government does not want a delay and wants to leave on 31 October.

A source told The Telegraph: & # 39; There is a prescribed letter to be sent … Does that stop the Prime Minister from sending other documents to the EU? I do not think so.

& # 39; Maybe a political explanation for government policy. It must make clear that the government is asking for an extension, but let's not forget what the next step is.

& # 39; Once that is done, Europeans will ask: & # 39; Why? What is the reason? (What) if the government said: & # 39; We have no reasons for an extension.

& # 39; There is now a clear path: Europeans must refuse an extension. & # 39;

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France has already suggested that the veto could be extended to prolong the talks, with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, who told reporters: & # 39; We are not going to do this every three months (the deadline renewal). & # 39;

And yesterday, Foreign Minister Dominic Raab indicated that No. 10 would not fight without fighting, and said Johnson & # 39; held on to his weapons & # 39; to get the land & # 39; out of this routine & # 39 ;.

Johnson joined Yesterday in Chevening, the land residence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, to conduct the Brexit crisis with his closest assistants. It is believed that chief strategist Dominic Cummings (outside of his London home last week) included

Johnson joined Yesterday in Chevening, the land residence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, to conduct the Brexit crisis with his closest assistants. It is believed that chief strategist Dominic Cummings (outside of his London home last week) included

Johnson joined Yesterday in Chevening, the land residence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, to conduct the Brexit crisis with his closest assistants. It is believed that chief strategist Dominic Cummings (outside of his London home last week) included

His comments raise the prospect of a crunch legal challenge in the Supreme Court in the weeks prior to October 31.

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After declaring last week that he prefers & # 39; in a ditch & # 39; If he were to die beyond postponing Brexit, he would refuse to request an extension at the EU Council on 17 and 18 October. That would force MPs to sue him for trying to enforce the law – which could potentially lead to a major constitutional clash.

Downing Street sources have said they would like to & # 39; sabotage & # 39 ;. But when the law was passed by MPs and Mr. Johnson's plans for an early election were blocked by opposition parties, there was widespread speculation that he could impose to stop.

During the weekend, a former public prosecutor warned that he would be convicted of disdain in court if he refused to comply with the law.

Labor MP: Corbyn unsuitable for the office

A senior Labor MP launched a tirade against Jeremy Corbyn's record as a leader and blamed him for the party's current anti-Semitism crisis.

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John Mann, retiring to the next election to become the government's anti-Semitic tsar, told The Sunday Times that he could never forgive Mr. Corbyn & # 39; that he has the & # 39; soul and ethics & # 39; of the party had hijacked & # 39 ;. & # 39 ;.

The Bassetlaw MP in Nottinghamshire also said that he could not campaign for Mr. Corbyn knowing that he could become prime minister.

The 59-year-old, who chairs the anti-Semitism parliamentary group, said to the newspaper: & Every time I meet a group of Jewish people, I shudder when they raise the PvdA issue. and Mr. Corbyn. It is impossible to overestimate the anger I have about that. & # 39;

Mann said he would not lie to the voters & # 39; & # 39; in an election campaign and added: & I am also not prepared to tell them that Mr Corbyn is fit to be prime minister. Because I don't think so. & # 39;

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In a sign of concern within the cabinet, Justice Minister and Lord Chancellor Robert Buckland QC revealed yesterday that he had personally challenged Mr. Johnson on the issue.

Rejecting the speculation that he could stop if & # 39; wide from the goal & # 39 ;, Buckland said he would continue to serve in his cabinet.

But he revealed that he had spoken with Mr. Johnson last weekend about the importance of the rule of law, which I have taken as Lord Chancellor & # 39 ;. His comments were seen as a threat to quit if Johnson Johnson actively disobeyed the law. Other ministers are expected to follow him.

Plaid Cymru leader Liz Saville Roberts said that breaking the law should result in his removal from parliament.

Johnson himself supported such a move against Tony Blair in 2004, but the mechanism has never been used successfully against a prime minister.

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Yesterday, Mr. Raab insisted that ministers abide by the law & # 39; but said that government attorneys & # 39; very carefully & # 39; would look at what the prime minister should do.

He said to Sky News on Sunday at Sophy Ridge: "We will abide by the law, but we will, because this is such a bad piece of legislation – the Surrender Bill who has supported Jeremy Corbyn – we also want to test to the extreme what is actually required by law. We will look very carefully at what it requires and what it does not require. I think that it is not only the legal thing to do, it is also the responsible person to do and, again, I repeat that legislation is bad. & # 39;

He also acknowledged for the first time that it might not be possible to withstand another extension of Article 50 – but said that under those circumstances, the blame would lie with & # 39; Jeremy Corbyn, the liberal democrats and others who unwilling to respect the referendum & # 39 ;.

In a separate interview, Interior Minister Sajid Javid said that Mr Johnson would not ask for an extension at the EU Council on 17 and 18 October. Describing the bill as an attempt to "squeeze" the bargaining position of Britain, he said that ministers were our options on October 19.

The law will enter into force on that date if no agreement has been reached. He told the Prime Minister that he should apply for an extension until 31 January and accept any extension agreed by the EU.

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The Mail understands that No. 10 strategists have discussed whether a civil servant can be sent to sign the extension so that Johnson does not have to do it personally.

Labor & # 39; s shadow attorney general Shami Chakrabarti said that Mr. Raab's comments were irresponsible and elitist & # 39; were and called Mr. Johnson a & # 39; tinpot dictator & # 39 ;.

She told Sky News: & # 39; The idea that a sitting prime minister in one of the oldest democracies in the world would say: & # 39; I will ignore the law & # 39; and he says: & # 39; Oh no, it doesn't ignore the law, it just tests it a little bit & # 39 ;. Is that what we say to our children, is that what we say to poor working people, vulnerable people in this country?

& # 39; I think (so & # 39; n) position is irresponsible and elitist, the idea that there is one law for Boris Johnson and his friends and another law for all others, it is terrible. & # 39;

The leader of the conservative party will fly to Ireland on Monday morning to meet Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, but his counterpart poured cold water on suggestions for a breakthrough in the stalemate about a solution to the Irish backlog, the safety net agreed by the European Union and the UK to avoid a hard border in Northern Ireland.

Sajid Javid does not exclude FIVE times pact with Nigel Farage

Sajid Javid has not ruled out a Tory pact with the Brexit party of Nigel Farage in the next elections.

The Chancellor said the conservative party did not need electoral alliances to win.

But on BBC1 & # 39; s Andrew Marr Show, he refused five chances to explicitly exclude a pact.

Javid claimed that the government had a plan to deliver Brexit without Farage's help – but claimed it would be mad to talk about it on television.

& # 39; There are actually new ideas, & # 39; he insisted. & # 39; Anyone who understands how negotiation works knows that you would not discuss it in public and place it in the public domain.

Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage addresses party members and delegates at Doncaster Racecourse during the Brexit Party Conference tour on September 4 in Doncaster

Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage addresses party members and delegates at Doncaster Racecourse during the Brexit Party Conference tour on September 4 in Doncaster

Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage addresses party members and delegates at Doncaster Racecourse during the Brexit Party Conference tour on September 4 in Doncaster

& # 39; I am absolutely clear that we are working wholeheartedly, tightening every tendon, to get a new deal and the Prime Minister is personally making all the important efforts that you would expect.

& # 39; I know there is a proposal and it would be insane to talk about it in public. & # 39; Mr. Farage has asked the Tories to sit aside in Labor seats in the north in exchange for an agreement that the Brexit party will not stand against pro-Leave Tories.

Many conservatives prefer such an alliance because they fear that Labor can sneak in many seats if both the Tory and Brexit party candidates stand.

Javid said: & # 39; We definitely need an election now. We are forced to do so because Parliament is trying to conclude these negotiations. & # 39;

He was asked five times to exclude a pact with the Brexit party, which is believed to have privately excluded Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Javid said: & # 39; We don't need an electoral alliance with anyone. We can stand on our own two feet, convey our message.

& # 39; The image our opponents paint of us, of course they would paint a false image. We are a proud center-right, moderate party from one country.

& # 39; There is nothing extremist about wanting to meet the will of the British people on a simple question that reads: & # 39; Do you want to leave the EU or not? & # 39 ;. We are not yet in an election. I am clear that we do not need an alliance with anyone. & # 39;

Farage has publicly offered a non-attack treaty between the two parties, citing the considerable losses of the conservatives in the 2019 elections to the European Parliament.

He wrote in the Sunday Telegraph and said the offer & # 39; 100 percent genuine & # 39; and added: & # 39; Johnson must recall the European elections in May, when his party came in fifth, and wonder: does he want the Tories to be in a similar disastrous position when the results of the next general elections coming in, or does he want to sign a non-attack treaty with me and return to Downing Street? & # 39;

Mr Javid's refusal to exclude a pact was criticized by the opposition. Minister of the Shadow Cabinet Office, Jon Trickett, said: & The Tories refuse to exclude a dirty deal with the Brexit party from Nigel Farage because they know he has all their cuts in public services and the sale of our NHS to Donald Trump. & # 39;

Evicted Tory MP Sam Gyimah told Radio 5 Live: & I know that there is a serious level of turmoil about what the government is doing, not just in terms of No Deal, but an explicit attempt to bring the conservative party of moderate MPs to purify because they see it as the way to steal the Brexit party from under Nigel Farage.

& # 39; If the conservative party can look more like the Brexit party, then they hope to get its votes without a pact. & # 39;

What is your plan, Boris? Cabinet Minister Nicky Morgan urges Tory colleagues & # 39; s to support Prime Minister Boris Johnson under attack, but warns that he & # 39; more transparent & # 39; MUST be about his relations with the EU

A cabinet minister today calls on Tory, moderately, to assist Boris Johnson and help him deliver Brexit.

The party was plunged into a new civil war on the weekend following the resignation of Secretary for Work and Pensions Amber Rudd.

Amid speculation, at least one minister could follow her, culture secretary Nicky Morgan insists that she stay in the room & # 39; and the prime minister the & # 39; necessary support & # 39; would give a Brexit deal.

She writes for the Daily Mail and says that Johnson is right to keep No Deal on the table and insists that the public was fed up with the lack of progress on the Brexit & # 39; is.

The party was plunged into a new civil war on the weekend following the resignation of Secretary for Work and Pensions Amber Rudd. Shown today at the Andrew Marr Show

The party was plunged into a new civil war on the weekend following the resignation of Secretary for Work and Pensions Amber Rudd. Shown today at the Andrew Marr Show

The party was plunged into a new civil war on the weekend following the resignation of Secretary for Work and Pensions Amber Rudd. Shown today at the Andrew Marr Show

Her comments will be seen as an attempt to calm One Nation Tories, disrupted by the departure of Miss Rudd and the deportation of 21 conservative MPs last week.

But in a challenge for the prime minister, Mrs. Morgan also says that he & # 39; more transparent & # 39; on the progress of negotiations with Brussels.

& # 39; With our support, the prime minister must now show that he seriously wants to make a deal & # 39 ;, she writes. & # 39; More transparency … about the discussions is needed to ensure that everyone has no doubts about how a deal is possible and the effort being made to ensure that a deal takes place. & # 39;

Miss Rudd left the cabinet and put down the Tory whip on Saturday due to the & # 39; cleansing & # 39; of the rebels – including former Chancellors Ken Clarke and Philip Hammond – who made it a & # 39; attack on decency and democracy & # 39; called.

She also accused Mr. Johnson of omitting & # 39; to pursue a deal with the EU, and said that there is & # 39; no evidence & # 39; was that he wants a negotiated agreement. In what was seen as a signal that others could follow, she said & # 39; many people are concerned & # 39 ;.

In a challenge for the prime minister, Nicky Morgan (outside of No10 Downing Street last week) also says that Boris Johnson should be "more transparent" about the progress of negotiations with Brussels

In a challenge for the prime minister, Nicky Morgan (outside of No10 Downing Street last week) also says that Boris Johnson should be "more transparent" about the progress of negotiations with Brussels

In a challenge for the prime minister, Nicky Morgan (outside of No10 Downing Street last week) also says that Boris Johnson & # 39; more transparent & # 39; on the progress of negotiations with Brussels

But in her article, Ms. Morgan defends Mr. Johnson, who says that it is clear from the start that we must leave on October 31 – deal or No Deal & # 39 ;. Her intervention came as:

  • A bill to force Mr. Johnson to postpone the Brexit if he did not make a deal before October 19 would receive Royal Assent today;
  • Foreign Minister Dominic Raab said that Mr. Johnson is enacting legislation to the limit & # 39; would test – and thereby pave the way for a fight with the Supreme Court;
  • Amid the turmoil, the Prime Minister was driven by two polls that gave the Tories a two-digit lead over Labor;
  • Therese Coffey, an environment minister, was promoted to cabinet to fill in work and pensions;
  • Interior Minister Sajid Javid refused three times to exclude an election pact with Nigel Farage;
  • Trade union leaders promised to march to & # 39; as quickly as possible & # 39; to force a general election despite Jeremy Corbyn standing in the way;
  • Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell was accused of "driving the EU" & # 39; after he suggested that Labor would not try to significantly change Theresa May's Brexit deal;
  • The French Foreign Minister threatened to vote against a Brexit extension next month;
  • Hammond came under fire from Tory MPs after he claimed that the party was in a & # 39; extreme right-wing faction & # 39; was changed.
Jo Johnson spoke outside his home after resigning as a minister of universities last week

Jo Johnson spoke outside his home after resigning as a minister of universities last week

Jo Johnson spoke outside his home after resigning as a minister of universities last week

Yesterday, a series of cabinet ministers who supported Remain moved in 2016 to deny that they would follow Miss Rudd, including health minister Matt Hancock, justice minister Robert Buckland, and minister of Northern Ireland, Julian Smith.

There were even claims that Mr Smith had threatened after an argument over the No Deal legislation for Northern Ireland. Mr. Buckland indicated that he would stop if Mr. Johnson refused to adhere to the rule of law.

A junior transport minister, George Freeman, tweeted that the exit from Miss Rudd & # 39; another huge blow & # 39; and it would undermine confidence that there was a & # 39; serious ambition to get a withdrawal agreement & # 39 ;. The tweet was deleted later.

Just like Miss Rudd, Ms. Morgan supported Remain in 2016. But she is seen as a pragmatist and admired by Tory Brexiteers for her work on & # 39; alternative arrangements & # 39; to tackle the border in Northern Ireland.

Today the prime minister is traveling to Dublin for the expected difficult talks with the Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, in what assistants said, was further evidence of his determination to pursue a deal.

MPs are also expected to vote on Tory's demands for an early general election, which Labor and other opposition parties have committed to blocking.

I want a deal – but we have to be willing to leave without a deal

from Nicky Morgan

Watching talented colleagues running away from the cabinet table is never easy. I am sorry that Amber Rudd and Jo Johnson have decided to do this in recent days.

I respect their decision, but the Prime Minister has made it clear from the start that we must leave on October 31 – deal or No Deal.

In the words of the musical Hamilton, I intend to stay in the room where it happens & # 39; to ensure that, together with my colleagues, the Prime Minister receives the necessary support to fulfill his priority: closing a deal with the EU when we leave October 31.

I am sorry that Amber Rudd and Jo Johnson have decided to do this in recent days. Amber Rudd appeared today on the Andrew Marr Show

I am sorry that Amber Rudd and Jo Johnson have decided to do this in recent days. Amber Rudd appeared today on the Andrew Marr Show

I am sorry that Amber Rudd and Jo Johnson have decided to do this in recent days. Amber Rudd appeared today on the Andrew Marr Show

Before joining the government, I worked for months as part of the Prosperity UK Commission on alternative arrangements for the Irish backstop. Our work has shown that there are other ways to prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland.

The use of these alternative arrangements is now crucial to get that deal with the EU, enabling an orderly exit on October 31 and ultimately fulfilling the 2016 referendum.

I know from discussions within the government that our proposals are being adopted and this work is taking place seriously.

An overwhelming majority of conservative MPs and party members supported the Prime Minister's deal of no deal plan when he was elected leader of the conservative party in July.

Three years after the referendum, we must find a way to bring our country back together and end the volatility of British politics.

It is no surprise that the public is exhausted and fed up. I share this frustration – they voted three years ago for departure and it is our duty to achieve that result.

People want certainty and that is why the constant political games of Jeremy Corbyn have to stop. Mr Corbyn's Surrender Bill last week is another opportunistic tactic to undermine the prime minister's negotiations and will simply see endless delays. People now want Brexit to be delivered so that we can concentrate on our domestic agenda.

With our support, the prime minister must now show that he seriously wants to close a deal. Pictured, Amber Rudd and Boris Johnson on the last day of the 2017 Coservative Conference

With our support, the prime minister must now show that he seriously wants to close a deal. Pictured, Amber Rudd and Boris Johnson on the last day of the 2017 Coservative Conference

With our support, the prime minister must now show that he seriously wants to close a deal. Pictured, Amber Rudd and Boris Johnson on the last day of the 2017 Coservative Conference

And I agree that the No Deal option should be kept on the table. Although it is clear to all of us that a deal is preferable, I know from my years as a merger and acquisition lawyer that no two parties to a negotiation can be forced to agree a deal.

That is why ministers and departments have been increasing our preparations throughout the summer to ensure that the UK is well prepared for a No Deal on 31 October when that opportunity unfolds.

But the entire government, from the prime minister, is clear that it is a priority to make a deal with the EU.

That is why he visited Berlin and Paris last month and will see the Irish Prime Minister today. That is why David Frost, the Prime Minister's envoy, spends so much time in Brussels explaining the position of the UK.

That is why the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, also visits EU capitals.

With our support, the prime minister must now show that he seriously wants to close a deal.

There is more transparency, such as the one by the Brexit secretary yesterday, about the discussions needed to ensure that everyone has no doubts about how a deal is possible and the effort being made to ensure that a deal takes place. In our future negotiations on a free trade agreement, the government will face the same pressure when it comes to disclosure.

I want the Prime Minister to succeed in his priority in finding a deal with the EU. A deal means that the ambitious Queen & # 39; s Speech program we have planned can be the main focus after three endless years of Brexit – what a relief that would be for everyone.

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