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The prime minister (photo in the middle) told MPs that they would be asked tomorrow afternoon to vote for a poll before Christmas to replace & # 39; this dysfunctional parliament and get the Brexit ready & # 39;

Boris Johnson will make a dramatic final attempt on December 12 to force an election.

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The prime minister told MPs that they would be asked tomorrow afternoon to vote for a pre-Christmas survey to replace & diminish this dysfunctional parliament and get the Brexit ready & # 39 ;.

Jeremy Corbyn today blocked a first attempt to hold an election on December 12 by denying Labor MPs. According to the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act, an early poll requires the support of two-thirds of all MPs.

The prime minister (photo in the middle) told MPs that they would be asked tomorrow afternoon to vote for a poll before Christmas to replace & # 39; this dysfunctional parliament and get the Brexit ready & # 39;

The prime minister (photo in the middle) told MPs that they would be asked tomorrow afternoon to vote for a poll before Christmas to replace & # 39; this dysfunctional parliament and get the Brexit ready & # 39;

The ministers tried tonight to convince the liberal democrats and the SNP to support a bill that would change the law by a simple majority and hold a December election.

In exchange, the prime minister agreed to their requests to stop the attempts to pass his Brexit deal.

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His assistants admit that tomorrow's vote is probably his last chance to have a quick poll.

Yet it is said that the smaller parties fear that a date of December 12 could deprive students & # 39; & # 39; whose conditions end that week.

Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson refused to say whether her 19 MPs would support Johnson tomorrow, but pointed out that she had rejected December 12.

Government sources said it was too late to reach the desired date of the Lib Dems of December 9 – but indicated that the next two days were possible compromise options.

In the Commons, Mr. Johnson said: & We will not allow this paralysis to continue. This house can no longer hold the land hostage. Millions of families and businesses cannot plan for the future. & # 39;

The prime minister accused Mr. Corbyn of running "literally and figuratively away from the judgment of the British people".

Jeremy Corbyn blocked a first attempt today to hold an election on December 12 by denying Labor MPs

Jeremy Corbyn blocked a first attempt today to hold an election on December 12 by denying Labor MPs

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Jeremy Corbyn blocked a first attempt today to hold an election on December 12 by denying Labor MPs

In other Brexit developments:

  • Brussels confirmed that Britain's exit from the EU will be postponed until at least 31 January, unless Parliament approves Mr Johnson's deal earlier;
  • None of them was challenging about the delay and said that the fact that the Prime Minister's promise to make or die not to get the UK on time was Parliament's fault;
  • A £ 100 million advertising campaign that warned the country to prepare for the possibility of a No Deal Brexit on October 31 was & # 39; interrupted & # 39 ;;
  • SNP leader Ian Blackford warned that his MPs could use electoral law to implement their dream of extending the vote to 16 and 17 year olds;
  • Downing Street denies that Labor claims it plans to open the & # 39; chicken run & # 39; from his marginal seat in West London to a safer one in Kent;
  • Official figures revealed that nearly two million people have registered to vote in the last eight weeks amid increasing speculation about an early election.

Johnson is simply unable to hold an election because of the terms of the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act, which state that the next election may not be held until June 2022.

The legislation, adopted by the coalition government, allows an early election only if two-thirds of the members of parliament support the idea in a Commons vote.

But today, for the third time in recent months, Mr Corbyn ordered his Labor MPs to abstain. As a result, the vote was won by 299 votes against 70 – well below the 434 votes needed to secure an early poll.

Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson refused to say whether her 19 MPs would support Johnson tomorrow, but pointed out that she had rejected December 12
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Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson refused to say whether her 19 MPs would support Johnson tomorrow, but pointed out that she had rejected December 12

Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson refused to say whether her 19 MPs would support Johnson tomorrow, but pointed out that she had rejected December 12

Johnson said the government would now continue with a & # 39; simple bill & # 39; that sets the Fix-Term Parliaments Act aside and states that the next elections should be held on December 12.

The idea was first introduced on the weekend – with a date of December 9 – by the Lib Dems and SNP, who both see an electoral advantage in going to the polls before Brexit is delivered.

Tonight, Tory head whip Mark Spencer led intensive talks with his counterparts in the two small parties hoping to compromise on a pre-Christmas election.

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Government sources said it was virtually impossible to get the legislation in time for an election on December 9, as this would require Parliament to be dissolved on Thursday evening.

Sources said that MPs also had to go through Northern Ireland's fiscal legislation before an election could be held.

Corbyn suggested that parts of the country would be too dark at night to hold an election on December 12.

He later seemed to hint that he could drop his opposition if the poll was held a few days earlier.

An overview of how parliamentarians voted today. It shows that the Lib Dems were against the vote, while the SNP and Labor abstained

An overview of how parliamentarians voted today. It shows that the Lib Dems were against the vote, while the SNP and Labor abstained

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An overview of how parliamentarians voted today. It shows that the Lib Dems were against the vote, while the SNP and Labor abstained

But labor spokesman Andy McDonald tonight suggested that his party would probably not change position and support the government.

& # 39; I think it is very unwise to hold general elections in the run-up to Christmas, & # 39; he said.

Mr. Johnson's allies are determined to secure a pre-Christmas election, believing that this is the only way to break the Brexit deadlock. The prime minister said to MPs: & # 39; There is a widespread opinion throughout the country that this Parliament has had its course.

& # 39; I simply do not believe that this Parliament is capable of delivering on people's priorities, whether that is Brexit or something else. & # 39; However, some senior Tories such as Northern Ireland Secretary Julian Smith, Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan and Health Secretary Matt Hancock have argued that it would be better to try to get the Brexit deal from the Prime Minister before going to the polls.

Damian Green, leader of the One Nation group of Tory MPs, urged Mr. Johnson to continue trying to get the withdrawal agreement through parliament instead of gambling with an election. Mr. Green said: “It is much better for us to hold an election after the withdrawal agreement is adopted. Any other way of acting is incredibly risky. & # 39;

Colleague Tory Matthew Offord warned an amendment to give 16 and 17 year olds the voice & # 39; inevitably & # 39; because & # 39; it is the only way Labor can save itself & # 39 ;. The SNP, which last week described the idea of ​​a December election as & # 39; barking crazy & # 39 ;, has indicated that it could now support an early poll.

However, the party's Westminster leader Ian Blackford said today that he would insist that 16-year-olds get the vote – a red line for No. 10.

Commons speaker John Bercow addresses MPs during the debate about whether or not to call a general election

Commons speaker John Bercow addresses MPs during the debate about whether or not to call a general election

Commons speaker John Bercow addresses MPs during the debate about whether or not to call a general election

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Angus MacNeil, a senior SNP Member of Parliament, warned Mr. Johnson to hand over a & # 39; Christmas gift & # 39 ;.

He said: & # 39; We'd better have a referendum than an election, which can give a side victory with 35 percent of the vote. We currently have it in a cage.

& # 39; He quickly becomes an escaped vulture when he gives you a Brexit or a No Deal Brexit or whatever you want and claims a mandate for it. & # 39;

Former cabinet minister David Gauke, one of 21 Tory MPs suspended for opposing No Deal, also warned of a December election and said: & # 39; If someone opens the front door in December for a stranger, they expect a Christmas song to be sung, not asked how they will vote. & # 39;

After today's vote, Mr Corbyn said that Labor would like to examine all the ministers he proposed.

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He said it should be clear that the government could not enforce the Brexit against Parliament's wishes. & # 39; We look forward to a clear, final decision that no deal is absolutely off the table and there is no risk that this prime minister will not keep his word because he has a form about these matters, & # 39; he added.

Miss Swinson said: & # 39; If Boris Johnson wants a general election, he could have supported our general election law on December 9. & # 39;

Still arguing, but a deal can be made: the Q&A of JACK DOYLE

What happened in the Commons?

MPs voted 299 in favor and 70 against in favor of a general election on December 12, but failed to achieve the two-thirds majority required by the law on fixed-term parliaments.

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Labor abstained after Jeremy Corbyn issued a crawling statement why he opposed an election – including that it was & # 39; too dark & ​​# 39; would be. Boris Johnson accused him of running away from the judgment of the people.

Does it not mean election?

No. Immediately after the vote, Mr. Johnson stood up in the Commons and announced that he would publish a brief bill to change the law and set the date for an election on December 12.

This would only require a simple majority of MEPs to succeed. He said that the Commons could no longer & # 39; keep the country hostage & # 39 ;.

Will the bill come through?

It is unclear. At the weekend, the Liberal Democrats and the SNP, who both want an election, proposed a bill similar to that of Mr Johnson, but with the date set on December 9.

Tonight Lib Dems suggested that they would not vote for the later election date of Mr Johnson, who may have put a big spanner in the works. The SNP said it would not dance to Boris Johnson's melody & # 39 ;.

European Council President Donald Tusk confirmed that the UK will have three months to break through its Brexit deadlock by either accepting a deal or holding a general election

European Council President Donald Tusk confirmed that the UK will have three months to break through its Brexit deadlock by either accepting a deal or holding a general election

European Council President Donald Tusk confirmed that the UK will have three months to break through its Brexit deadlock by either accepting a deal or holding a general election

Would three extra days make a big difference?

In the big picture of things, no. But there is some suggestion that the Lib Dems and Labor prefer an earlier poll because more students would be at the university, potentially giving the opposition parties an advantage.

However, many major universities end on Christmas December 13 before Christmas. Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson is also concerned that Mr. Johnson might try to cut back the Brexit bill and cancel it before the election day. That was in fact excluded by No. 10.

What will be in store tomorrow?

Either the parties for the elections come to an agreement quickly or they no longer have time to hold a poll before Christmas. 25 full working days must be allowed between the dissolution of Parliament and an election.

No 10 insists that an election on December 9 is not possible because there is not enough time to complete the bill – along with other essential parliamentary issues – by Thursday. But if the elections were a little later, there is, in theory, enough time to get through.

What is the opinion of No. 10?

Sources on Downing Street suggested that the prime minister would be willing to compromise, suggesting that a & # 39; series & # 39; data was possible between December 9 and 12.

But a decision must be made quickly. If the bill does not properly pass on its second reading in the Lower House tomorrow, the pre-Christmas election will be effectively eliminated. Ministers cannot go later than December 12, because they run the risk of running into the Christmas period.

Cabinet Secretary Sir Mark Sedwill has warned that the 12th is the last date or the election would mean turfing pantomimes, parties and nativity from village halls and schools used as polling stations.

Are there any other obstacles to a poll?

In theory, the House of Lords could cause problems and the bill and the members of parliament in the Commons could try to change it with votes for 16 and 17 year olds. But peers would be very unwise to try to block the legislation and change the franchise so late would make an election impossible. The Lib Dems and SNP will kill the elections if they vote for such changes.

What about the Brexit withdrawal law?

No 10 says that the legislation to remove Britain from the European Union is dead until after the elections. Sources suggested that the prime minister would have been willing to bring back the bill this week if Labor leave members agreed to support it through the Commons. There were no such guarantees.

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