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Boris Johnson & # 39; s latest attempt to force the pre-Christmas elections

Boris Johnson today dramatically won his fight for a pre-Christmas election when Jeremy Corbyn admitted and said he would help cause a snap poll.

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Less than 24 hours after rejecting the Prime Minister's demand to go to the country to resolve the Brexit deadlock, the Labor leader claimed that his test for excluding No Deal was met. In an attempt to give a courageous face to the humiliating capitulation, he insisted: & # 39; I can't wait to take to the streets. & # 39;

The sudden decline came after the Remainer alliance collapsed, with SNP and Lib Dems about to later support the legislation in the Commons that would have forced an election – whether or not Mr. Corbyn wanted one.

But the experienced left winger is still confronted with a massive rebellion by back seat members who are afraid of being put into the sword by the Tories. Labor was 16 points behind in the polls.

WHAT DATE CAN A ELECTION BE HELD?

12 December

A short piece of legislation is being presented this afternoon to MPs that would cause an election on December 12 – although the date is still being crossed.

The government says that this date is the last before Christmas that a general election could be held before schools and village halls – traditionally used as polling stations – fill up with festive events.

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It is also a Thursday, which traditionally takes place when elections are held.

December 9

The smaller parties – the SNP and the Lib Dems – want the date to be 9 December.

They are concerned that leaving it later would mean that many university students have gone home – and may not have been registered in the right place to vote.

They are also nervous that Mr. Johnson might make a U-turn and decide to reclaim the bill.

December 11 & # 39; compromise & # 39;

A No10 source drove a compromise this morning and suggested December 11.

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But ministers have said that the earlier timetable is not possible because the bill must be adopted by the end of Thursday and other laws must be passed for Northern Ireland.

A member of parliament said to MailOnline: & They are completely crazy. They think they are on the eve of a brave new socialist dawn. & # 39;

They added that the decision was & # 39; proof that turkeys vote for Christmas & # 39 ;.

The crucial developments came after the prime minister had made a fourth attempt to force a quick poll.

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A short piece of legislation will be presented this afternoon to MPs that would activate the vote on December 12 – although the date is still being passed.

It would be the first election in December since 1923.

Earlier, Mr. Johnson tried to force an election by submitting a motion under the Permanent Parliaments Act, which requires a two-thirds majority in the Commons.

That threshold can only be reached if Mr Corbyn agrees, and he vetoed the move last night.

But the latest tactics only require a simple majority, and there were fears that SNP and Lib Dem support meant that Labor would be shamelessly taken by surprise.

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Johnson has already met the major demands of the smaller parties by accepting that his Brexit deal will be suspended until after an election.

But they claim that the date should be December 9 instead of 12, the problem probably being the subject of a row in the Commons.

A No10 source drove a compromise this morning and suggested December 11.

But ministers are determined that the earlier timetable is not possible because the bill must be adopted by the end of Thursday and other laws must be passed for Northern Ireland.

Mr Corbyn boldly attempted to face his capitulation this afternoon and did not rule out his support for possible changes to the bill – such as a proposal that would vote 16 and 17 year olds.

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& # 39; There will be a parliamentary process this afternoon. We're going there to run an election campaign, and I can't wait to get out on the street, "he said at Labor headquarters in London.

He previously said to the shadow cabinet: & # 39; We have now heard from the EU that the extension of Article 50 to January 31 has been confirmed, so for the next three months our condition to scrap No Deal is now met.

& # 39; We will now launch the most ambitious and radical campaign for real change that our country has ever seen. & # 39;

A high source of labor said the party now supports & # 39; a December election & # 39 ;.

Jeremy Corbyn (photo this morning) told the shadow cabinet that his test to exclude No Deal has now been passed – despite claiming the opposite last night

Corbyn said the election was a & # 39; chance for a generation to build a country for many & # 39;

Corbyn said the election was a & # 39; chance for a generation to build a country for many & # 39;

Corbyn said the election was a & # 39; chance for a generation to build a country for many & # 39;

Boris Johnson (pictured last night in Westminster) said that he did not give the public the & # 39; inconvenience & # 39; of a pre-Christmas election, but Parliament cannot deliver & # 39;

Boris Johnson (pictured last night in Westminster) said that he did not give the public the & # 39; inconvenience & # 39; of a pre-Christmas election, but Parliament cannot deliver & # 39;

Boris Johnson (pictured last night in Westminster) said that he did not give the public the & # 39; inconvenience & # 39; of a pre-Christmas election, but Parliament cannot deliver & # 39;

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Mr Corbyn's abrupt decline came in the midst of increasing signs of Labor panic that they would come around in the elections.

The experienced left winger and his closest assistants wanted to cast a showdown vote.

The Labor leader initially claimed that the party would support an early vote if the EU allowed an extension until January 31 – as happened yesterday.

What happened in Parliament yesterday?

Boris Johnson, the SNP and the Lib Dems have tried to put together an unlikely alliance to render Jeremy Corbyn powerless.

In the light of a massive uprising in the back seat, Mr. Corbyn blocked the prime minister's last bid to force a quick poll last night.

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That motion was submitted under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, which means that two-thirds of the Commons must vote in favor.

But the experienced left winger runs the risk of being flanked after the SNP and Lib Dems have broken the ranks.

They offered to support a one-line invoice that the FTPA would bypass. In exchange, the prime minister would give up the hope that he would pass the Brexit law before an election.

However, the date can be a major bottleneck, as Mr. Johnson wants December 12 and the other parties demand December 9.

Later, however, he raised the bar to insist that Mr. Johnson had to rule out that a deal would never happen.

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The prime minister did not do this.

Following his full face, Corbyn is confronted with a massive uprising by half of his MPs, who are afraid of being eaten alive by the Tories and Lib Dems, and would rather have a second Brexit referendum for an election.

But assuming a date can be found, the figures in Parliament look overwhelming.

Shadow international trade secretary Barry Gardiner had suggested earlier today that Labor was about to make a dramatic U-turn.

Asked what Mr. Johnson could do to get Labor support, he said: & I think it would be first to ensure that students will not be excluded on the election date. & # 39 ;

Pressed about whether December 9 would be more acceptable than December 12, Mr. Gardiner said: & # 39; that would certainly do it. & # 39;

Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson refused to say last night whether her 19 MPs would support Mr. Johnson this afternoon, but pointed out that she had rejected December 12.

Government sources said it was too late to reach the desired date of the Lib Dems of December 9 – but indicated that the next two days were possible compromise options.

In the Commons, Mr. Johnson said: & We will not allow this paralysis to continue. This house can no longer hold the land hostage. Millions of families and businesses cannot plan for the future. & # 39;

The prime minister accused Mr. Corbyn of running "literally and figuratively away from the judgment of the British people".

Jacob Rees-Mogg and Michael Gove today at Cabinet

Jacob Rees-Mogg and Michael Gove today at Cabinet

Esther McVey

Esther McVey

Jacob Rees-Mogg and Michael Gove (left) and Esther McVey (right) were with the cabinet today

Chancellor Sajid Javid seemed excited when he left the cabinet meeting today

Chancellor Sajid Javid seemed excited when he left the cabinet meeting today

Chancellor Sajid Javid seemed excited when he left the cabinet meeting today

Johnson is simply unable to hold an election because of the terms of the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act, which state that the next election may not be held until June 2022.

The legislation, adopted by the coalition government, allows an early election only if two-thirds of the members of parliament support the idea in a Commons vote.

Why is there a dispute about whether the elections should take place on 9 or 12 December?

The fate of Boris Johnson & # 39; s second general election vote on Tuesday largely depends on whether he can reach a compromise with the SNP and Lib Dems when the poll would be held.

A full 25 working days is needed between the dissolution of the Parliament and an election, so number 10 insists that a date on 9 December is not possible.

However, Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson is afraid that Johnson could use the later date to try and bring his Brexit bill back and cancel it before election day. The prime minister has rejected these concerns and says the bill is dead until after an election.

There is also a suggestion that the Lib Dems and Labor prefer an earlier poll because more students would be at the university, which might give them an advantage. The fact is, however, that many major universities end on Christmas December 13 before Christmas.

Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill has warned that December 12 is the last possible date for an election or that it would mean canceling Christmas events in village halls and schools to make way for polling stations.

But last night, for the third time in recent months, Mr Corbyn ordered his Labor MPs to abstain. As a result, the vote was won by 299 votes against 70 – well below the 434 votes needed to secure an early poll.

Johnson said the government would now continue with a & # 39; simple bill & # 39; that sets the Fix-Term Parliaments Act aside and states that the next elections should be held on December 12.

The idea was first introduced on the weekend – with a date of December 9 – by the Lib Dems and SNP, who both see an electoral advantage in going to the polls before Brexit is delivered.

Tonight, Tory head whip Mark Spencer led intensive talks with his counterparts in the two small parties hoping to compromise on a pre-Christmas election.

Government sources said it was virtually impossible to get the legislation in time for an election on December 9, as this would require Parliament to be dissolved on Thursday evening.

Sources said that MPs also had to go through Northern Ireland's fiscal legislation before an election could be held.

Corbyn suggested that parts of the country would be too dark at night to hold an election on December 12.

He later seemed to hint that he could drop his opposition if the poll was held a few days earlier.

But labor spokesman Andy McDonald tonight suggested that his party would probably not change position and support the government.

& # 39; I think it is very unwise to hold general elections in the run-up to Christmas, & # 39; he said.

An overview of how MPs voted last night. It shows that the Lib Dems were against the vote, while the SNP and Labor abstained

An overview of how MPs voted last night. It shows that the Lib Dems were against the vote, while the SNP and Labor abstained

An overview of how MPs voted last night. It shows that the Lib Dems were against the vote, while the SNP and Labor abstained

Mr. Johnson's allies are determined to secure a pre-Christmas election, believing that this is the only way to break the Brexit deadlock. The prime minister said to MPs: & # 39; There is a widespread opinion throughout the country that this Parliament has had its course.

& # 39; I simply do not believe that this Parliament is capable of delivering on people's priorities, whether that is Brexit or something else. & # 39; However, some senior Tories such as Northern Ireland Secretary Julian Smith, Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan and Health Secretary Matt Hancock have argued that it would be better to try to get the Brexit deal from the Prime Minister before going to the polls.

Damian Green, leader of the One Nation group of Tory MPs, urged Mr. Johnson to continue trying to get the withdrawal agreement through parliament instead of gambling with an election. Mr. Green said: “It is much better for us to hold an election after the withdrawal agreement is adopted. Any other way of acting is incredibly risky. & # 39;

Colleague Tory Matthew Offord warned an amendment to give 16 and 17 year olds the voice & # 39; inevitably & # 39; because & # 39; it is the only way Labor can save itself & # 39 ;. The SNP, which last week described the idea of ​​a December election as & # 39; barking crazy & # 39 ;, has indicated that it could now support an early poll.

However, the party's Westminster leader Ian Blackford indicated last night that he would insist on 16-year-olds to vote – a red line for No. 10.

Johnson's Brexit strategist Dominic Cummings (left today) was in Downing Street while the last quarrel continued

Johnson's Brexit strategist Dominic Cummings (left today) was in Downing Street while the last quarrel continued

Johnson's Brexit strategist Dominic Cummings (left today) was in Downing Street while the last quarrel continued

Angus MacNeil, a senior SNP Member of Parliament, warned Mr. Johnson to hand over a & # 39; Christmas gift & # 39 ;.

He said: & # 39; We'd better have a referendum than an election, which can give a side victory with 35 percent of the vote. We currently have it in a cage.

& # 39; He quickly becomes an escaped vulture when he gives you a Brexit or a No Deal Brexit or whatever you want and claims a mandate for it. & # 39;

Former cabinet minister David Gauke, one of 21 Tory MPs suspended for opposing No Deal, also warned of a December election and said: & # 39; If someone opens the front door in December for a stranger, they expect to get a Christmas song, not asked how they will vote. & # 39;

After the vote last night, Mr Corbyn said that Labor would like to examine all the ministers he proposed.

He said it should be clear that the government could not enforce the Brexit against Parliament's wishes. & # 39; We look forward to a clear, final decision that no deal is absolutely off the table and there is no risk that this prime minister will not keep his word because he has a form about these matters, & # 39; he added.

Miss Swinson said: & # 39; If Boris Johnson wants a general election, he could have supported our general election law on December 9. & # 39;

Which day will an election be held? And what does this mean for the Brexit now that Jeremy Corbyn has FINALLY supported calls for a quick poll?

Jeremy Corbyn finally expressed his support today for a general election that took place before Christmas, as all major parties agreed on a snap poll, the only way to break the Brexit deadlock.

Boris Johnson tried and failed to force an early election yesterday for the third time because Labor blocked the prime minister's plans.

But less than 24 hours later, Mr. Corbyn made a screeching turn because he said his conditions for supporting an election were met.

Although the Tories, Labor, Liberal Democrats and SNP are now united and say they want an election, there is still a big queue about exactly when the nation should go to the polls.

Johnson has proposed an election date of December 12, while the liberal democrats of Jo Swinson and the SNP want December 9.

Labor still has to be formally committed on a specific date, but it is thought that Mr Corbyn is unlikely to support Mr Johnson's proposed solution.

Johnson will be asking MPs this afternoon for the fourth time before the election with the debate in the lower house probably dominated by a fight over the date.

The appointment of an election day is now the only obstacle to the first general election in December since 1923.

Below you will find all answers to all important questions as the UK prepares for its third general election in five years.

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured in the photo that left his home in London today, told the shadow cabinet this morning that Labor will now support an early election

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured in the photo that left his home in London today, told the shadow cabinet this morning that Labor will now support an early election

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured in the photo that left his home in London today, told the shadow cabinet this morning that Labor will now support an early election

Which day will a general election be held and what happens today?

A short piece of legislation is being presented this afternoon to MPs that would cause an election on December 12 – although the date is still being disputed.

Johnson has already met the main requirements of the SNP and Lib Dems by accepting that his Brexit deal will be suspended until after an election.

The smaller parties, however, want the date to be 9 December.

They are concerned that leaving it later would mean that many university students have gone home – and may not have been registered in the right place to vote.

They are also nervous that Mr. Johnson might be making a U-turn and decides to try to reduce the withdrawal agreement.

A source of number 10 brought a compromise this morning because they suggested a possible date of December 11.

But the ministers have said that the earlier timetable is not possible because the bill should have gone through both the Lower House and the Upper House and had received royal approval by the end of Thursday – an incredibly tight turnaround.

What does this mean for the Brexit?

The EU granted the United Kingdom a three-month extension yesterday, leaving time for an election.

If MPs vote today for a quick poll, the Brexit process will be effectively interrupted until a new party of MPs is elected.

If Mr. Johnson wins a majority in the election, he will continue with his Brexit deal. If Mr Corbyn wins a majority, he will hold a second referendum.

If Mrs Swinson won a majority, she would repeal Article 50 and cancel the Brexit.

What did Jeremy Corbyn say today and why did he change his mind?

Yesterday, Mr Corbyn set out his opposition to a poll on December 12, saying that "in parts of the country will be dark before 4 p.m.," while many students have just terminated their conditions. and went home for Christmas & # 39 ;.

But he hinted that the party could sign up for a slightly earlier date of December 9. He then instructed the Labor MPs to abstain from voting on an election on 12 December.

Johnson had to win the support of two-thirds of the MPs to succeed – 434 – but he only got the support of 299.

Mr Corbyn changed his mind this morning when he told the shadow cabinet that Labor would now support an election based on the fact that a Brexit was excluded for the next three months.

He said: & # 39; I have consistently said that we are ready for an election and our support depends on a No Deal Brexit that is off the table.

& # 39; We have now heard from the EU that the extension of Article 50 to January 31 has been confirmed, so for the next three months our condition to scrap No Deal is now met.

& # 39; We will now launch the most ambitious and radical campaign for real change that our country has ever seen. & # 39;

So is there going to be a general election before Christmas?

Assuming that the four main parties can agree on a date today, the answer is yes.

It would be surprising if the Tories, Labor, Lib Dems and SNP all agreed that they only want an election to make the poll fall apart due to a disagreement over a few days.

However, given the volatility of British politics and mistrust between the parties, it is possible.

Would the three extra days between December 9 and December 12 really make a difference?

In the big picture of things, no. But there is some suggestion that the Lib Dems and Labor prefer an earlier poll because more students would be at the university, potentially giving the opposition parties an advantage.

However, many major universities end on Christmas December 13 before Christmas.

Mrs Swinson is also concerned that Mr Johnson could try to reduce his Brexit bill and cancel it before election day. But that was effectively excluded by No. 10.

Does Boris Johnson need the support of two-thirds of the MPs to activate the elections today?

No. The three previous failed attempts by the government to force an election were submitted under the 2011 Fixed Term Law.

That law dictates that such motions must guarantee the support of two-thirds of the members of parliament to succeed.

But today the government seeks support for a bill. Voting on legislation requires only a simple majority to succeed.

Can amendments derail the election urge?

The government has tried to make the election law watertight to prevent MPs from trying to add proposals or requirements that could derail the legislation – such as voting on 16.

Assuming the government's tight wording has been successful, it is unlikely that changes will be allowed.

What happened in the Commons last night?

MPs voted 299 in favor and 70 against in favor of a general election on December 12, but failed to achieve the two-thirds majority required by the law on temporary parliaments.

Labor abstained after Mr Corbyn had issued a crawling statement as to why he was opposed to an election – including that it would be "too dark". Johnson accused him of "running away from the judgment of the people."

How does Number 10 see all this?

Sources on Downing Street suggested that the prime minister would be willing to compromise, suggesting that a & # 39; range & # 39; data was possible between December 9 and 12.

But a decision must be made quickly. If the bill for early elections does not pass the House of Commons today, the pre-Christmas election is effectively disabled.

Ministers cannot go later than December 12, because they run the risk of running into the Christmas period.

Cabinet Secretary Sir Mark Sedwill has warned that December 12 is the last possible date or the election would mean turfing pantomimes, parties and nativity from village halls and schools used as polling stations.

What about the Brexit withdrawal law?

No 10 says that the legislation to remove Britain from the European Union is dead until after the elections.

Sources suggested that the prime minister would have been willing to bring back the bill this week if Labor leave members agreed to support it through the Commons. There were no such guarantees.

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