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Bolivian president Evo Morales flees to Mexico and holds the flag of the country up

Evo Morales, the former leader of Bolivia, has fled to Mexico and left a country in turmoil after his resignation two days ago.

Morales posed with a Mexican flag while being deported on exile on an air force jet last night.

& # 39; His life and integrity are safe, & # 39; Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard announced when he revealed that the plane had left.

Mexico had offered asylum to the socialist leader yesterday for fear that he would be arrested after his abrupt dismissal.

The 60-year-old resigned under pressure from the army after weeks of protests over a disputed election result.

In exile: the former president of Bolivia, Evo Morales, holds up a Mexican flag aboard a Mexican Air Force jet while leaving his country last night

In exile: the former president of Bolivia, Evo Morales, holds up a Mexican flag aboard a Mexican Air Force jet while leaving his country last night

Celebrations: A police officer holds up a crucifix while joining some of his flagged colleagues in La Paz to rejoice in the dismissal of Evo Morales

Celebrations: A police officer holds up a crucifix while joining some of his flagged colleagues in La Paz to rejoice in the dismissal of Evo Morales

Celebrations: A police officer holds up a crucifix while joining some of his flagged colleagues in La Paz to rejoice in the dismissal of Evo Morales

Clashes: a man with a bloody face is being held by security forces yesterday during clashes between supporters and opponents of Morales in La Paz

Clashes: a man with a bloody face is being held by security forces yesterday during clashes between supporters and opponents of Morales in La Paz

Clashes: a man with a bloody face is being held by security forces yesterday during clashes between supporters and opponents of Morales in La Paz

Who is former Bolivian leader Evo Morales?

Evo Morales was the longest-serving president in Latin America until he resigned on Sunday.

A member of the Aymara people, he grew up in poverty on the highlands of Bolivia and was a lama shepherd, coca-farmer and left-wing union leader before he rose to hold his office as the first indigenous president of his country.

Morales was one of the last of the wave of left-wing leaders who gained power in the region in early 2000.

Under his rule, Bolivia achieved milestone profits against hunger and poverty.

Bolivia's economy has more than tripled in size during its 13 years in office.

According to the World Bank, the country's poverty rate has fallen from 45 percent of the population in 2010 to 35 percent in 2018.

However, opponents accused him of tolerating corruption and investing in flashy infrastructure projects at the expense of health and education.

A good example was his decision last year to move the government headquarters to a luxury skyscraper in La Paz.

Environmentalists also blame him for forest fires that destroyed 10 million hectares of forest and grassland.

Morales, a fierce critic of the United States, was a loyal ally of leftist governments in Cuba and Venezuela.

After the conditions had expired, Morales tried to amend the Bolivia constitution for a fourth time.

He lost that referendum, but he persevered and persuaded the highest court of the country to allow him again.

Opponents say the court is full of his allies and accuses him of a & # 39; blow to democracy & # 39; to hit.

His election victory last month was set to keep him in power until 2025, but protests have now prevented him from accepting the fourth term.

& # 39; It hurts me to leave the country for political reasons, but I will always watch. I'll be back soon with more power and energy, & Morales said on Twitter.

Back in Bolivia, the army that helped expel Morales agreed to help the police secure the streets.

Looting broke out after Morales' resignation and civilians shuffled Monday with the supporters of the former president in La Paz.

The crisis deepened yesterday when gangs unhappy with the departure of Morales attacked police stations and civilians and caused panic in the street.

On Monday evening, hundreds of Morales supporters protested from nearby El Alto to La Paz outside the presidential palace.

The police have been largely restricted to barracks since riots broke out and have asked the army to intervene.

& # 39; The military forces' command has led to joint operations with the police to prevent bloodshed and fighting among the Bolivian family, & # 39 ;, said Major-General Williams Kaliman on a television broadcast.

The UK Department of Foreign Affairs has already warned about & # 39; anything but essential travel & # 39; to Bolivia, and said the situation & # 39; very uncertain & # 39; used to be.

Three people have died in clashes since the disputed elections.

An opposition senator, Jeanine Anez, will succeed Morales as interim president and has promised to hold new elections.

The legislators will meet on Tuesday to start the trial.

Dozens of ministers and officials resigned together with Morales, many of whom sought refuge in foreign embassies.

Morales also claimed last night that two of his homes had been attacked by & # 39; vandalism groups & # 39 ;.

Opposition leader Carlos Mesa also claimed that & # 39; a violent crowd & # 39; was on his way to his house to attack it.

Morales said his opponents, Mesa and Luis Fernando Camacho, will go down in history as racists and coup plotters.

Celebrations: a huge crowd of waving Bolivian flags occupy a road in the aftermath of the resignation of Morales, prompted by weeks of protests over a disputed election last month

Celebrations: a huge crowd of waving Bolivian flags occupy a road in the aftermath of the resignation of Morales, prompted by weeks of protests over a disputed election last month

Celebrations: a huge crowd of waving Bolivian flags occupy a road in the aftermath of the resignation of Morales, prompted by weeks of protests over a disputed election last month

Three nuns hold Bolivian flags in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, East Bolivia, after the president's resignation on Sunday

Three nuns hold Bolivian flags in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, East Bolivia, after the president's resignation on Sunday

Three nuns hold Bolivian flags in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, East Bolivia, after the president's resignation on Sunday

The decline of the & # 39; pink tide & # 39; of left-wing leaders in Latin America

Evo Morales belonged to a wave of left-wing leaders who came to Latin America in early 2000.

In what a & # 39; pink tide & # 39; was called, voters turned their backs on the right-wing governments that had supported the US in the Cold War, and chose a large number of socialist leaders, including Hugo Chavez from Venezuela and Lula from Brazil.

The left wave, coinciding with a prolonged rise in goods, reformed state institutions in Latin America and polarized domestic politics.

However, 15 years later the left is at a low pace on the continent.

Morales has disappeared, Lula has spent the last 18 months in prison, Chavez is dead and his successor Nicolas Maduro is struggling to retain power.

Many of the left governments collapsed after the end of the commodity boom caused a recession.

Venezuela is in the midst of an economic collapse and has suffered from serious food and medicine shortages and unbridled inflation.

Moreover, there is still a great rage about inequality in much of South America.

Last year, Brazil swung in the opposite direction to choose extreme right-wing candidate Jair Bolsonaro.

However, Argentina recently embarked on the trend by choosing a leftist leader, with former socialist figurehead Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner as vice-president.

Morales was a former coca farmer and was the first indigenous president of the country and came to power in 2006 amid a wave of left-wing triumphs on the continent.

Donald Trump praised the resignation of Morales as an & # 39; important moment for democracy in the Western Hemisphere & # 39; and praised the role of the country's army.

& # 39; These events send a strong signal to the illegal regimes in Venezuela and Nicaragua that democracy and the will of the people will always prevail, & # 39; said Trump.

Many Bolivians celebrated fireworks and honking horns on the streets after Morales' resignation.

& # 39; We celebrate that Bolivia is free & # 39 ;, said a demonstrator at the presidential palace in La Paz.

Others, however, saw the demise of the 60-year-old Morales as a return to the gloomy era of military coups that dominated Latin America for a long time.

The socialist leaders of Venezuela and Cuba have already condemned what they called a coup, while their mutual ally Russia accused the opposition of unleashing violence to bring down Morales.

Morales defended his legacy on Sunday, including milestone profits against hunger and poverty and a tripling of the country's economy during its nearly 14 years in office.

He achieved a controversial fourth term when he was declared the winner of the presidential election with a small margin.

But the opposition cried dirty and three weeks of street protests followed, killing three people and injuring hundreds.

An OAS audit of the elections found irregularities in just about every aspect that it investigated.

Morales called new elections, but commanders of the armed forces and the police supported his resignation.

Some of his allies who resigned, including the speaker of the lower house and my minister Cesar Navarro, cited fear of the safety of their families as a reason to resign.

Why did Evo Morales resign and what will happen afterwards in Bolivia?

How did it come to that?

Evo Morales was appointed for a fourth term as Bolivian president, who would have held him in office until 2025, when he was declared the winner of the October election.

However, there were widespread claims of fraud that caused protests in which three people died and hundreds were injured.

The Organization of American States found irregularities in just about every aspect that it investigated: the technology used, the chain of custody of ballot papers, the integrity of the census and statistical projections.

Bolivia's army urged Morales to resign and he finally did so on a television address on Sunday.

What is the reaction in Bolivia?

There was cheering among opponents of Morales waving the Bolivian flag in La Paz in the aftermath of his resignation.

Many Bolivians celebrated on the street by blowing off fireworks and honking their car horns.

The president's critics said he had undermined democracy in Bolivia by exceeding deadlines to run again and demanding victory in a disputed poll.

Others, including Morales himself, saw it as a return to the gloomy era of coups under the control of Latin American soldiers.

Spain and Mexico, as well as Morales' socialist allies in Cuba and Venezuela, have already expressed concern about the nature of his downfall.

What will happen next?

Jeanine Anez, the second vice-president of the Senate, has said she will take over the interim presidency with the intention of holding new elections.

Everyone else in the line of succession had already resigned or left office together with Morales on Sunday.

Morales himself was transferred to Mexico on Monday evening after receiving asylum there.

The Spanish government said holding new elections & # 39; as soon as possible & # 39; the best way would be to get out of the current crisis & # 39 ;.

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