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Boeing CEO will appear before Congress to admit that the company has made & # 39; mistakes at 737 Max jet & # 39;

On the anniversary of the first of two fatal crashes involving Boeing 737 Max jets, the CEO will tell Congress that the aircraft company knows it has made mistakes and throws everything in the plane.

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"We have learned and are still learning from these accidents," said Dennis Muilenburg, according to comments prepared for delivery Tuesday to a Senate committee. & # 39; We know we made mistakes and did things wrong. We own that and we repair it. & # 39;

An important lawmaker said on Monday that Boeing should have been good the first time, before the Max began to carry passengers.

On the anniversary of the first of two fatal crashes involving Boeing 737 Max jets, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg will tell Congress that the aircraft company knows it has made mistakes regarding the aircraft blamed for two fatal crashes

An important lawmaker said on Monday that Boeing should have been good the first time, before the Max started to transport (photo) passengers

An important lawmaker said on Monday that Boeing should have been good the first time, before the Max started to transport (photo) passengers

An important lawmaker said on Monday that Boeing should have been good the first time, before the Max started to transport (photo) passengers

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Muilenburg is scheduled to testify on Tuesday before the Senate Trade Committee, and then again on Wednesday before the Home Transport Committee.

Boeing released its prepared statement on Monday.

The apparitions come when Boeing is confronted with investigations by both committees and a criminal probe by the Ministry of Justice. It is also being sued by families of some of the 346 people who died in the crash of a Max off the coast of Indonesia on October 29, 2018, and another in Ethiopia on March 10.

In their final report on the first crash, Indonesian researchers said last week that Boeing's design of an important flight control system made the aircraft vulnerable if a single sensor failed – disregarding the long-standing dependence of the aviation industry on redundant disaster prevention systems. They also accused Lion Air, which operated the aircraft, and American regulators who approved it for flight.

Most pilots only knew about the flight control system, called MCAS, after the Lion Air crash. At Boeing's request, an explanation of this was excluded from manuals for pilots.

In his statement, Muilenburg said: & # 39; Our aircraft customers and their pilots have told us that they do not believe we have communicated enough about MCAS – and we have heard them & # 39 ;.

Representative Peter DeFazio, chairman of the House Transportation Committee, said he would ask why Boeing did not tell the US Federal Aviation Administration about changes during the development of the Max that have made MCAS more powerful. He suggested that Boeing disguised the true power of MCAS to discourage supervisors from further investigating the system.

Officials inspect an engine recovered from the crashed Lion Air jet in Jakarta, Indonesia, on October 29, 2018
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Officials inspect an engine recovered from the crashed Lion Air jet in Jakarta, Indonesia, on October 29, 2018

Officials inspect an engine recovered from the crashed Lion Air jet in Jakarta, Indonesia, on October 29, 2018

Forensic investigators and recovery teams collect personal belongings and other material from the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 crash site on March 10, 2019

Forensic investigators and recovery teams collect personal belongings and other material from the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 crash site on March 10, 2019

Forensic investigators and recovery teams collect personal belongings and other material from the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 crash site on March 10, 2019

On both deadly flights, a faulty sensor caused MCAS to push the nose down and pilots couldn't save the planes. Boeing now makes the nose down pitch less frequent and powerful, and it adds redundancy by linking it to two sensors and two computers instead of one at a time.

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& # 39; They seem to have done what they should have done in the beginning, meaning they have made the system less radical & # 39 ;, DeFazio said. & # 39; There are countless supervisors looking at this, it's not just the FAA. This will be the most thoroughly researched solution in the history of the aviation industry & # 39 ;.

Congress is expected to consider changes to the way FAA certifies new aircraft and its practice of replacing Boeing employees and other aircraft manufacturers to perform safety tests on key components.

Some relatives of deceased passengers want Boeing to be banned from conducting safety assessments – they want FAA inspectors to do all that work. Such a change would require a major increase in the FAA budget. According to DeFazio, there are around 45 FAA inspectors supervising 1200 Boeing employees who perform a large proportion of the actual tests.

Several family members of Max victims want Muilenburg to pay a personal price for the accidents and the reaction of Boeing.

& # 39; We don't think Muilenburg should become CEO anymore & # 39 ;, said Michael Stumo, whose daughter Samya was on the Ethiopian Airlines Max. & # 39; He chaired this, minimized it, tried to convince everyone that it was a pilot error, everything was fine, it's a safe plane. Everything has been dissolved, denied, pointing the finger somewhere else & # 39 ;.

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Muilenburg, who is expected to meet some family members on Wednesday, lost his title as chairman of the Boeing council earlier this month. The most up to now rejected chief executive was the head of Boeing's commercial aircraft division, Kevin McAllister.

Boeing said that Muilenburg visited the Indonesian embassy in Washington on Monday evening to meet the ambassador and offer condolences to the Indonesian people.

An aerial view shows Boeing 737 MAX aircraft at Boeing facilities at Grant County International Airport in Moses Lake, Washington, September 16, 2019

An aerial view shows Boeing 737 MAX aircraft at Boeing facilities at Grant County International Airport in Moses Lake, Washington, September 16, 2019

An aerial view shows Boeing 737 MAX aircraft at Boeing facilities at Grant County International Airport in Moses Lake, Washington, September 16, 2019

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