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Blind woman told that she could not get on a bus from Melbourne with her guide dog bumps the driver

“This is not OK”: Blind woman who was told that she could not get on a bus with her guide dog bumps driver for lighting a HOUR-long stand-off – as a company apologizes apologies

  • Louise Pearson and her guide dog tried to board a bus in Melbourne on Tuesday
  • The bus driver refused to let Pearson on and told her “no dogs on the bus”
  • A passenger told the driver that Mrs. Pearson regularly follows the route to work
  • After a one-hour break with Mrs. Pearson and her dog, the driver called the police

A blind woman who was refused access to a bus because of her guide dog has argued for more driver training after her hours of stalemate did not end until the police arrived.

Louise Pearson and her seeing eye dog Arthur tried to board a bus in Greensborough, in the north-east of Melbourne on Tuesday morning.

She was astonished when the driver told her: “No dogs on the bus.”

Mrs. Pearson said she repeatedly stated that the driver Arthur, a golden retriever, was a guide dog for a remarkable distance that lasted more than an hour.

Louise Pearson and her seeing eye dog Arthur tried to get on a bus in Greensborough, in the north-east of Melbourne on Tuesday morning when the driver told her 'no dogs on the bus'

Louise Pearson and her seeing eye dog Arthur tried to get on a bus in Greensborough, in the north-east of Melbourne on Tuesday morning when the driver told her ‘no dogs on the bus’

Mrs. Pearson urged the bus company to train their drivers better.

“They are generally very good – but this is not OK,” she said 7 News.

She said that the driver, who had been working for six months, did not seem interested in listening to her explanation.

A passenger intervened and told the driver that Mrs. Pearson regularly traveled the route on the way to work with Arthur, but he still did not shrink.

“We’ve been here for the last 50 minutes because he says it’s not a guide dog,” Pearson told 3AW.

After a one-hour break with Mrs. Pearson and her dog, the bus driver called the police.

Officers offered to drive her to work, but she refused and took a stand against the driver.

She said she repeatedly tried to tell the driver that Arthur, a golden retriever, was a guide dog

She said she repeatedly tried to tell the driver that Arthur, a golden retriever, was a guide dog

She said she repeatedly tried to tell the driver that Arthur, a golden retriever, was a guide dog

“That’s not how you win a fight,” she said.

The driver finally gave in under pressure from the passengers and left Mrs. Pearson and Arthur on the bus.

“I can’t believe we have this kind of nonsense these days,” she said.

“I’m completely blind. I’m just trying to go to work! ”

Mrs. Pearson said the fault lies with the bus company, which has to train their drivers

Mrs. Pearson said the fault lies with the bus company, which has to train their drivers

Mrs. Pearson said the fault lies with the bus company, which has to train their drivers

Paul Giusti, manager of the responsible bus company, Dyson Group, said they are investigating the incident.

“It seems that it was caused by a misunderstanding of the driver,” said Mr. Giusti.

“Dysons apologizes without reservation for any inconvenience to the passenger and others on the bus.”

They said they were disappointed that Mrs. Pearson’s journey to work was not as it should have been and revised their driver training program.

Guide dogs are legally permitted to travel on all public transportation under Victorian law.

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