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Black transgender woman of 22 will be shot dead in Dallas – at least the 19th victim of transmission in 2020

22-year-old black transgender woman shot in Dallas – at least the 19th victim of transmission across the country this year – as lawyers say has been a ‘tumultuous time’ for the progressive city’s trans community

  • 22-year-old Merci Mack was found unconscious by a passer-by in a parking lot, with a clear gunshot wound to the head
  • She was identified by friends and local transsexuals advocates after being initially given a dead name by the Dallas authorities
  • No witnesses have come forward in connection with the shooting
  • Residents reported gunshots at about 5:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning, but did not call 911
  • A passerby called the authorities at about 6.15 am
  • Since May 2018, four trans women of color – including Mack – have been murdered in Dallas

22-year-old Merci Mack was found unconscious by a passer-by in a parking lot, with a clear gunshot wound to the head

22-year-old Merci Mack was found unconscious by a passer-by in a parking lot, with a clear gunshot wound to the head

A black transgender woman was fatally shot on Tuesday in Dallas – the 19th victim of a transmission this year.

Merci Mack, 22, was found unconscious by a passer-by in a parking lot, with a clear gunshot wound to the head.

She was identified by friends and local transsexual advocates after being initially given a dead name by the Dallas authorities. Dead-naming is when authorities or a person’s family choose to use a person’s birth name instead of their preferred name, often misunderstood in the process.

In a statement to NBCDallas police said it was “unable to confirm an alternative name for the victim.”

“Our detectives, like all murders, work diligently to find the culprit for this terrible crime,” Sgt. Warren said C. Mitchell. “We keep asking the community for their help.”

There are currently no witnesses to the murder, and the police are asking for public help.

She was identified by friends and local transsexuals advocates after being initially given a dead name by the Dallas authorities

She was identified by friends and local transsexuals advocates after being initially given a dead name by the Dallas authorities

She was identified by friends and local transsexuals advocates after being initially given a dead name by the Dallas authorities

Residents reported gunshots at about 5:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning, but did not call 911. The passerby called authorities at around 6:15 a.m.

She is the fourth transgender woman murdered during Pride, Out.com reports.

“Another black transgender woman had her life stolen from her,” said Tori Cooper, HRC director of community engagement for the Transgender Justice Initiative.

“We can’t get numb to the fact that our community has learned in recent weeks that there have been more murders of transgender and gender nonconforming people than HRC has ever detected in the past seven years. Her friends say Merci Mack was a young, happy soul who deserved to experience a full life. HRC mourns Merci’s loved ones and calls for a full and thorough investigation into her death. ‘

Residents reported gunshots at about 5:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning, but did not call 911, with a passerby eventually alerting authorities at around 6:15 a.m.

Residents reported gunshots at about 5:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning, but did not call 911, with a passerby eventually alerting authorities at around 6:15 a.m.

Residents reported gunshots at about 5:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning, but did not call 911, with a passerby eventually alerting authorities at around 6:15 a.m.

According to the human rights campaign, violence against transfolkers is devastating in the state of Texas, where at least 14 trans and gender-conforming people have been killed since 2016. That does not include Mack’s murder.

Since May 2018, four trans women of color – including Mack – have been murdered in Dallas.

“It was a very tumultuous time for the Dallas transgender community,” said Carter Brown, founder of the Black Trans Advocacy Coalition.

Brown noted that Dallas still had a way to go if it wanted to be progressive and actually included transsexuals.

“There is not really a place for trans people – not within the LGBT community, and especially for the black trans community, there is no place in the black community,” said Brown.

“So without community and without protection from friends or other people – let alone authority or the law – we are often just attacked and taken away because of transphobia and homophobia.”

“It just feels like we’re here as open ends.”

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