Black cop fired for using the n-word gets his job reinstated

Delvin White (pictured) returned to duty on Tuesday after Tampa's Civil Service Board ruled that Police Chief Brian Dugan's decision to fire him went too far, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

Delvin White (pictured) returned to duty on Tuesday after Tampa’s Civil Service Board ruled that Police Chief Brian Dugan’s decision to fire him went too far, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

A black police officer was reinstated in his job nearly six months after he was fired for using and defending the n-word while on duty as an expression of “culture and experiences among the African American community.”

Delvin White returned to duty on Tuesday after Tampa’s Board of Directors ruled that Police Chief Brian Dugan’s decision to fire him went too far. Tampa Bay Times reported.

While the board agreed that Dugan, who is white, had the right to fire White — a beloved resource officer at Middleton High School — it voted 3 to 0 to reinstate the officer, effective immediately.

“I don’t want the city to lose such an employee who clearly does his job above and beyond — a difficult job in, let’s face it, very difficult circumstances,” a board member told the Tampa Bay Times. “It’s like cutting your nose to tease your face.”

White was fired in March after a random audit of his bodycam caught him multiple times with the N-word in November 2020.

White was reinstated in his job nearly six months after he was fired for using and defending the n-word during his service as an expression of “culture and experiences among the African American community.”

While the board agreed that Chief Brian Dugan, (pictured), who is white, has the right to fire White - a beloved resource officer at Middleton High School - it voted 3 to 0 to reinstate the officer, with immediate effect. Entrance.

While the board agreed that Chief Brian Dugan, (pictured), who is white, has the right to fire White - a beloved resource officer at Middleton High School - it voted 3 to 0 to reinstate the officer, with immediate effect. Entrance.

While the board agreed that Chief Brian Dugan, (pictured), who is white, has the right to fire White – a beloved resource officer at Middleton High School – it voted 3 to 0 to reinstate the officer, with immediate effect. Entrance.

Pictured here is Middleton High School, where White was a beloved school resource officer

Pictured here is Middleton High School, where White was a beloved school resource officer

Pictured here is Middleton High School, where White was a beloved school resource officer

He was fired for “violations of policies that prohibit discriminatory behavior,” according to a decision letter from the Tampa Police Department.

Ahead of Monday’s vote, Dugan said his initial decision to fire White had nothing to do with the word itself, but that White was using the word around a minor.

“This is not about racism, this is about professionalism,” Dugan said, according to the Times. “Agent White doesn’t play golf with his brothers, he doesn’t play poker, he wears the uniform of a Tampa Police Department officer and talks to a student that way.”

At the time, White told his supervisor he didn’t mean the word derogatory, police said.

He added that he used the word as it is “often used in today’s society as a means of shared culture and experiences among the African American community.”

White was included with both the slur and the word “ghetto” to refer to a group of people as they drove home on the phone from an off-duty, work-related assignment on Nov. 13, the letter said.

At the time, White (pictured) told his supervisor he didn't mean the word was derogatory, police said.

At the time, White (pictured) told his supervisor he didn't mean the word was derogatory, police said.

At the time, White (pictured) told his supervisor he didn’t mean the word was derogatory, police said.

White later used the word during a phone conversation with his wife (pictured right)

White later used the word during a phone conversation with his wife (pictured right)

White later used the word during a phone conversation with his wife (pictured right)

He later used it again while on the phone with his wife.

Camera footage also captured White using the word twice while arresting a student on Nov. 30, when the student disobeyed White’s commands to put his hands behind his back for cuffing,

What exactly did Officer Delvin White say to get him fired?

CCTV footage captured White using the word twice while arresting a student on Nov. 30, when the student ignored White’s orders to put his hands behind his back for handcuffs.

“Man, fix me, bro. You trippin’, says the student in the bodycam footage.

“I told you, n*****, we don’t play games with your ass,” White replies.

‘You stumble’, the student replies.

“N*****, you’re tripping,” White responds.

‘You don’t know what a ***** is going through’, the student responds before getting into the patrol car

Tampa Police Chief Brian Dugan said in a statement, “Derogatory statements by police officers endanger the trust our department builds with our community.”

“Man, fix me, bro. You trippin’, says the student in the bodycam footage.

“I told you, n*****, we don’t play games with your ass,” White replies.

‘You stumble’, the student replies.

“N*****, you’re tripping,” White responds.

‘You don’t know what’s going on’, the student responds before getting into the patrol car.

Tampa Police Chief Brian Dugan said in a statement, “Derogatory statements by police officers endanger the trust our department builds with our community.”

“Tampa Police officers are held to a higher standard and incidents like this negatively impact the entire law enforcement profession.”

White’s supporters, many of them Middleton students and staff, agreed that the officer should have been punished for his behavior.

But they saw his dismissal, ending the career of a much-loved black officer at a school where the majority of students are black, unfair.

During Monday’s hearing, Kristina Ravenel, a former Middleton teacher, said the officer was committed to mentoring students and launching programs to make the campus cleaner and safer.

“He understood where they were coming from and did his best to help them understand that they don’t have to be a product of their environment,” Ravenel said.

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