Black and white photos show some of the first Victorian mountain climbers in Lake District Wales, Scotland

Amazing photos show Victorian mountain climbers scraping rock faces in the Lake District with skirts and tweeds – without safety equipment

  • Black and white photos show some of Britain's first mountain climbers scaling their peaks in Cumbria, Wales, Scotland
  • George and Ashley Abraham from Keswick started taking photos of them after a mountain climber visited them
  • Owen Glynn Jones arrived in the Lake District in the 1890s but later died after a fall in the Alps

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Amazing photos show some of Britain's first mountain climbers climbing peaks in full Victorian clothing and without any safety equipment.

Black and white photos taken in the Lake District, the Welsh Mountains and the Scottish Highlands in the late 19th century reveal how early mountain climbers clamber to great heights with just a few ropes to support them.

They were captured by the brothers George and Ashley Abraham, from Keswick in Cumbria, who were so inspired by the advent of pioneering adventurer Owen Glynn Jones in the 1890s that they made it their mission to explode all the peaks of the mountain .

Together the three men began to map routes on the steep rocks of the rugged landscape in north-west England.

Victorian climbers only had ropes to rely on when they reached great heights around the Lake District and Cumbria. Depicted is Owen Glynn Jones, a mountain climber who died young in a climbing accident in the Alps

Victorian climbers only had ropes to rely on when they reached great heights around the Lake District and Cumbria. Depicted is Owen Glynn Jones, a mountain climber who died young in a climbing accident in the Alps

A woman in a long Victorian robe makes her way up a rock face in Wales around the year 1900 accompanied by two men

A woman in a long Victorian robe makes her way up a rock face in Wales around the year 1900 accompanied by two men

A woman in a long Victorian robe makes her way up a rock face in Wales around the year 1900 accompanied by two men

A woman in a fully Victorian dress and petticoat poses with two male climbers on top of the Tryfan mountain in Wales in 1900

A woman in a fully Victorian dress and petticoat poses with two male climbers on top of the Tryfan mountain in Wales in 1900

A woman in a fully Victorian dress and petticoat poses with two male climbers on top of the Tryfan mountain in Wales in 1900

Stunning black and white photos from the late 19th century show how Victorian rock climbing really was

Stunning black and white photos from the late 19th century show how Victorian rock climbing really was

Stunning black and white photos from the late 19th century show how Victorian rock climbing really was

The photography skills of the Abraham brothers in combination with the daredevil spirit of Jones resulted in a series of heartbreaking photos, which were later sold as postcards, posters and books.

Victorian climbers had almost no safety equipment and wore thick tweed coats, dresses and country boots.

They often climbed at the same time, which meant that if a person fell off, everyone who got stuck would fall. Owen Glynn Jones met that fate when he fell into the Alps on August 28, 1899.

Although the three managed to place themselves with their cliff faces, it was Walter Perry Hadley Smith who became the real father of British mountain climbing.

Wait a second! Around 1893 a man was held to the stomach-moving movement on the pillar rock in the Lake District

Wait a second! Around 1893 a man was held to the stomach-moving movement on the pillar rock in the Lake District

Wait a second! Around 1893 a man was held to the stomach-moving movement on the pillar rock in the Lake District

George and Ashley Abraham from Keswick, Cumbria, started photographing mountaineers after meeting the pioneering adventurer Owen Glynn Jones in the 1890s. They are pictured here scaling a rock with only ropes to keep them safe

George and Ashley Abraham from Keswick, Cumbria, started photographing mountaineers after meeting the pioneering adventurer Owen Glynn Jones in the 1890s. They are pictured here scaling a rock with only ropes to keep them safe

George and Ashley Abraham from Keswick, Cumbria, started photographing mountaineers after meeting the pioneering adventurer Owen Glynn Jones in the 1890s. They are pictured here scaling a rock with only ropes to keep them safe

This striking black and white image shows a climber on the summit of Scafell Pinnacle in the Lake District around 1895

This striking black and white image shows a climber on the summit of Scafell Pinnacle in the Lake District around 1895

This striking black and white image shows a climber on the summit of Scafell Pinnacle in the Lake District around 1895

High in the Skye: these brave climbers are depicted around a peak on the Isle of Skye in Scotland around the year 1899

High in the Skye: these brave climbers are depicted around a peak on the Isle of Skye in Scotland around the year 1899

High in the Skye: these brave climbers are depicted around a peak on the Isle of Skye in Scotland around the year 1899

Five men and a woman are depicted around 1895, desperately clinging to Gash Rock in Langstrath, Lake District

Five men and a woman are depicted around 1895, desperately clinging to Gash Rock in Langstrath, Lake District

Five men and a woman are depicted around 1895, desperately clinging to Gash Rock in Langstrath, Lake District

A man is pictured on Eagle & # 39; s Nest Ridge in the Lake District with the deep valley that emerges around 1895

A man is pictured on Eagle & # 39; s Nest Ridge in the Lake District with the deep valley that emerges around 1895

A man is pictured on Eagle & # 39; s Nest Ridge in the Lake District with the deep valley that emerges around 1895

He became the first to ever climb Nape Needle in the late 1880s. The performance was well published and aroused public interest.

The activity became popular with middle-class professionals, doctors, lawyers, and teachers, and the Lake District began to attract many visitors.

The lakes are still a popular destination for mountaineers who can follow the footsteps of those early mountaineers today.

Climbers tied together with just a single rope with the summit of Moss Ghyll, Lake District around the year 1895

Climbers tied together with just a single rope with the summit of Moss Ghyll, Lake District around the year 1895

Mountaineers use the Lliwedd weapon storage facility in Wales around 1899

Mountaineers use the Lliwedd weapon storage facility in Wales around 1899

Mountaineers are depicted around Moss Ghyll in the Lake District around 1895 (left) and the West Buttress of Lliwedd in Wales around 1899 (right)

A stunning black-and-white photograph shows the heights of Great Gable in the Lake District, where climbers have peaked since the end of the 19th century despite a lack of safety equipment

A stunning black-and-white photograph shows the heights of Great Gable in the Lake District, where climbers have peaked since the end of the 19th century despite a lack of safety equipment

A stunning black-and-white photograph shows the heights of Great Gable in the Lake District, where climbers have peaked since the end of the 19th century despite a lack of safety equipment

Owen Glynn Jones was the mountaineer who inspired the Abraham brothers in the Lake District to photograph climbers. He died tragically young in a climbing accident in the Alps

Owen Glynn Jones was the mountaineer who inspired the Abraham brothers in the Lake District to photograph climbers. He died tragically young in a climbing accident in the Alps

Owen Glynn Jones was the mountaineer who inspired the Abraham brothers in the Lake District to photograph climbers. He died tragically young in a climbing accident in the Alps

George and Ashley Abraham were so inspired by the arrival of Owen Glynn Jones in the Lake District at the end of the 19th century that they started climbing climbs that scraped their tops. They were depicted in the 1930s when their own climbing days were long gone

George and Ashley Abraham were so inspired by the arrival of Owen Glynn Jones in the Lake District at the end of the 19th century that they started climbing climbs that scraped their tops. They were depicted in the 1930s when their own climbing days were long gone

George and Ashley Abraham were so inspired by the arrival of Owen Glynn Jones in the Lake District at the end of the 19th century that they started climbing climbs that scraped their tops. They were depicted in the 1930s when their own climbing days were long gone

A group portrait shows some of the first mountain climbers in Britain, including the first woman to lead Kern Knotts Crack, around Easter in 1897

A group portrait shows some of the first mountain climbers in Britain, including the first woman to lead Kern Knotts Crack, around Easter in 1897

A group portrait shows some of the first mountain climbers in Britain, including the first woman to lead Kern Knotts Crack, around Easter in 1897

Male and female climbers pose for a group on a bridge in the Lake District around 1897. They were among the first known mountain climbers in the UK

Male and female climbers pose for a group on a bridge in the Lake District around 1897. They were among the first known mountain climbers in the UK

Male and female climbers pose for a group on a bridge in the Lake District around 1897. They were among the first known mountain climbers in the UK

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