Bizarre turn when Sydney’s missing con artist Melissa Caddick hit with 38 charges – though she was presumed dead

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Missing fraudster Melissa Caddick has been hit with dozens of new charges related to eight years of fraud – despite police believing her dead and admitting that her disappearance may never be solved.

Caddick was charged with falsely claiming to be licensed for financial services 19 times, one of failing to produce a license, and 18 times for dishonest conduct regarding financial products in a local court in Sydney.

In addition to the 38 new charges filed by the Australian corporate regulator, the new documents filed revealed the extent of her crimes while running the unlicensed Maliver Pty Ltd.

The fraud allegedly took place for seven years and 11 months against a total of 29 people and companies.

Federal court heard more than $ 13 million in investor money was deposited into Melissa Caddick's account (pictured during a black tie event with husband Anthony Koletti, with a chain reportedly valued at $ 250,000).  He claimed to have been left penniless and is not charged with wrongdoing

Federal court heard more than $ 13 million in investor money was deposited into Melissa Caddick’s account (pictured during a black tie event with husband Anthony Koletti, with a chain reportedly valued at $ 250,000). He claimed to have been left penniless and is not charged with wrongdoing

Melissa Caddick (shown in the center in blue) poses for a photo during a business meeting with clients

Melissa Caddick (shown in the center in blue) poses for a photo during a business meeting with clients

Melissa Caddick (shown in the center in blue) poses for a photo during a business meeting with clients

The Australian Securities and Investment Commission has filed the new charges, according to documents seen through The Australian, although it is also taking separate steps in federal court.

Caddick received at least $ 13 million from unsuspecting customers and investors, making her fortune with luxury items and lavish travel overseas.

Her $ 8 million home in Dover Heights was raided by ASIC on Nov. 11, confiscating handbags, shoes, and clothing from high-end fashion brands. She disappeared after the robbery.

There was no sign of her until three months later a foot was found by campers in a trainer who had washed up on Bournda Beach on the south coast of New South Wales.

There was a DNA match between the limb and Caddick’s toothbrush material.

Caddick (center) also squandered $ 63,000 on vacations to Fiji, $ 37,000 on a trip to New York, and $ 120,000 on several ski trips to Aspen.  In the photo with her husband Anthony (right), who is not accused of wrongdoing

Caddick (center) also squandered $ 63,000 on vacations to Fiji, $ 37,000 on a trip to New York, and $ 120,000 on several ski trips to Aspen.  In the photo with her husband Anthony (right), who is not accused of wrongdoing

Caddick (center) also squandered $ 63,000 on vacations to Fiji, $ 37,000 on a trip to New York, and $ 120,000 on several ski trips to Aspen. In the photo with her husband Anthony (right), who is not accused of wrongdoing

Clearly, a lack of credible witnesses and a lack of relevant camera footage has led NSW police to start thinking that her disappearance may never be resolved.

More than 50 possible sightings were reported to NSW police in the weeks following her disappearance, but none turned out to be solid leads, let alone that Caddick was found.

An ASIC spokesperson avoided a conclusion as to whether she was alive or dead – although her decomposed foot washed up on a beach in February.

“It is not up to ASIC to determine or speculate whether Ms. Caddick is still alive,” the spokesman said.

“That is a matter for the NSW police and – should it come to that – a coroner.”

However, it has withdrawn its arrest warrants for Caddick – which had been issued in February – and its attorney noted that it was unable to issue the relevant court notice to the defendant.

“ A host of additional and, unsurprisingly, concerned consumers who claim to have invested with the defendants have contacted ASIC and provided additional information, ” documents filed in federal court read.

[And given] documents to ASIC regarding their investments showing that they invested approximately $ 13.1 million with the defendants. ‘

The case will be heard in court in Sydney on Tuesday.

The running show that washed up on Bournda Beach (pictured), 400 km from Caddick's house, featured human remains that were a DNA match with her toothbrush

The running show that washed up on Bournda Beach (pictured), 400 km from Caddick's house, featured human remains that were a DNA match with her toothbrush

The running show that washed up on Bournda Beach (pictured), 400 km from Caddick’s house, featured human remains that were a DNA match with her toothbrush

Divers no longer search for the remains of the 49-year-old financial advisor after searching more than 6,000 m2 / m in the water at Dover Heights in eastern Sydney.

Divers no longer search for the remains of the 49-year-old financial advisor after searching more than 6,000 m2 / m in the water at Dover Heights in eastern Sydney.

Divers no longer search for the remains of the 49-year-old financial advisor after searching more than 6,000 m2 / m in the water at Dover Heights in eastern Sydney.

Caddick and husband Anthony Kolletti, who is not accused of wrongdoing, together at a Crankbrook event

Caddick and husband Anthony Kolletti, who is not accused of wrongdoing, together at a Crankbrook event

Caddick and husband Anthony Kolletti, who is not accused of wrongdoing, together at a Crankbrook event

Two forensic experts have put forward a theory that Caddick may have died elsewhere before being moved closer to Bournda Beach, where her foot and trainer were discovered.

The south coast beach is over 400 km from where Caddick was last seen in her lavish Dover Heights home in Sydney.

“That’s remarkable, but it can happen,” said Professor John Hilton, a forensic pathologist.

Hilton said it’s possible a foot could survive such a long journey across the ocean without being destroyed and without the shoe being covered in barnacles, as some have speculated.

The 400 km-plus journey of the shoe that contained Caddick's foot

The 400 km-plus journey of the shoe that contained Caddick's foot

The 400 km-plus journey of the shoe that contained Caddick’s foot

Ulladulla SES employees searched the south coast of NSW for the remains of Caddick after the shoe was found

Ulladulla SES employees searched the south coast of NSW for the remains of Caddick after the shoe was found

Ulladulla SES employees searched the south coast of NSW for the remains of Caddick after the shoe was found

But he added ‘what surprises me is that they found it at all,’ given the size of the area involved.

Mr. Hilton acknowledged that she might have died closer to where the foot was found.

“There are all kinds of bizarre stories, including scraps with bits and pieces being thrown into the ocean much closer to where the foot washed up,” he said.

Another forensic expert, Professor Johan Duflou, expressed similar surprise to Mr. Hilton, thinking it was possible for her body to be moved.

“I thought it was relatively unlikely that the whole body would go this far and stay intact, but whether a shoe can do that or not, I don’t know.”

He suggested that police may need to scout the area where Caddick’s foot was found.

NSW Police Assistant Commissioner Mick Willing has also said foul play against Caddick was possible, but suicide was more likely.

Modeling by NSW Police rescue teams, taking into account tides and drift patterns, has explored the possibility that Caddick entered the water near Dover Heights, where she lived, around November 12.