Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Birdwatcher who had police called him to Central Park Karen and declined to cooperate in the investigation

Christian Cooper, the man who was the subject of the “Karen” police call in Central Park, would not cooperate with Manhattan prosecutors and assist the prosecutor with the investigation.

On Monday, 41-year-old Amy Cooper, who was called to police after feeling threatened while walking her dog in Central Park in May, was charged with wrongly reporting a third-degree incident.

Cooper, 57, says he believes Amy Cooper (not a family) has suffered enough from media shame along with losing her job and destroying her reputation.

An avid bird watcher, Christian Cooper was verbally attacked by Amy Cooper after asking her to check on her dog. He says he will not participate in any prosecution in the case

Cyrus Vance, Manhattan's DA, announced charges against Amy Cooper on Monday, but Christian Cooper says the prosecutor will have to prosecute without his input.

Cyrus Vance, Manhattan's DA, announced charges against Amy Cooper on Monday, but Christian Cooper says the prosecutor will have to prosecute without his input.

Cyrus Vance, Manhattan’s DA, announced charges against Amy Cooper on Monday, but Christian Cooper says the prosecutor will have to prosecute without his input.

“On the one hand, she has already paid a high price,” said Cooper New York Times. “Isn’t that a deterrent to others? Delivering her more misery just seems to pile up.

“If the prosecutor feels the need to file a complaint, he must file a charge. But he can do that without me, ”Cooper added.

Following the response, Ms. Cooper responded apologetically through a PR firm that she “responded emotionally and made false assumptions about his intentions.”

“He had every right to request that I keep my dog ​​on a leash in an area where it was needed,” she said in a written statement.

“I am well aware of the pain caused by erroneous assumptions and insensitive statements about race and never thought I would be involved in the kind of incident that occurred to Chris.”

Amy Cooper confronted Christian Cooper in Central Park in May

Amy Cooper confronted Christian Cooper in Central Park in May

Amy Cooper confronted Christian Cooper in Central Park in May

Cooper called police on Memorial Day after Christian Cooper asked her to keep her dog on a leash, according to Central Park rules. Cooper accused Christian of threatening her life

Cooper called police on Memorial Day after Christian Cooper asked her to keep her dog on a leash, according to Central Park rules. Cooper accused Christian of threatening her life

Cooper called police on Memorial Day after Christian Cooper asked her to keep her dog on a leash, according to Central Park rules. Cooper accused Christian of threatening her life

But Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, a professor of constitutional law at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, believed that Christian Copper still plays a role in what follows.

“If the police thought she was really under attack, they could have entered with drawn weapons and she would have been the only witness in this – outside of that video that may or may not have surfaced,” Browne-Marshall told The Times.

“This is not just about Christian Cooper. The community has been disadvantaged by Amy Cooper’s actions and to put this right, New York residents must have their day in court, even though Christian Cooper is an unwilling witness. ‘

Considered by many to be a harrowing example of everyday racism, Ms. Cooper’s distress call sparked outrage in the period leading up to street protests provoked by the death of George Floyd by police.

It also inspired New York state lawmakers in June to pass a law that makes it easier under civil rights law to sue someone who calls a police officer someone “for no reason” because of his background, including race and national origin .

The new law, which the governor also signed last month, apprehends a person who holds such 911 calls liable “for an injunction, damages, or any other appropriate relief” in a civil suit.

Ms. Cooper was charged under an existing false report law that has long been on the books and does not refer to race.

During the incident on May 25, Ms. Cooper was asked by birdwatcher Christian Cooper to keep her dog on a leash, as park guidelines dictate.

In a Facebook post, he claimed that the dog “ripped through the plantings” in the Ramble area of ​​the park and told her to go to another part of the park.

When she refused, he brought out dog treats, making her shout at him not to get close to her dog.

Amy Cooper then called the police at Christian.

“Our office prosecuted Amy Cooper for falsely reporting a third-degree incident,” said Manhattan prosecutor Cyrus Vance, Monday.

“We do everything we can to hold perpetrators of this behavior to account.”

Cooper has received an agency appearance ticket and will be charged on October 14.

Signs in the Ramble call for environmental protection for wildlife

Signs in the Ramble call for environmental protection for wildlife

Signs in the Ramble call for environmental protection for wildlife

If convicted, she may be conditionally discharged or sentenced to community service or counseling instead of imprisonment.

Christian captured the interaction on his phone in a video that went viral.

“I’m on the Ramble, there’s a man, African American, he has a bike helmet and he picks me up and threatens me and my dog,” she said hysterically to the operator, grasping her dog’s collar firmly.

“I’m threatened by a man on the Ramble, send the police immediately!”

When she hung up and kept her dog on a lead, Christian replied, “Thank you.”

The video then ends.

Christian, a Harvard graduate who works in communications, has long been a prominent birdwatcher in the city and sits on the board of the New York City Audubon Society.

In the aftermath of the video, Cooper surrendered her dog, Henry, to the cocker spaniel rescue group she adopted two years earlier.

She has since been reunited with the dog.

However, she was fired as head of insurance portfolio management at Franklin Templeton.

Christian, a Harvard graduate and communications officer, has long been a prominent birdwatcher in the city and sits on the board of the New York City Audubon Society

Christian, a Harvard graduate and communications officer, has long been a prominent birdwatcher in the city and sits on the board of the New York City Audubon Society

Christian, a Harvard graduate and communications officer, has long been a prominent birdwatcher in the city and sits on the board of the New York City Audubon Society

Cooper, pictured with Henry, apologized for her behavior on May 25 in Central Park

Cooper, pictured with Henry, apologized for her behavior on May 25 in Central Park

Cooper, pictured with Henry, apologized for her behavior on May 25 in Central Park

Christian told The View that he accepts Cooper’s apology, but he believes the incident is part of a much deeper problem of racism in America that needs to be addressed.

“I accept her apology,” said Christian.

“I think it’s a first step. I think she needs to think about what happened because until the time she made that statement it was just a conflict between a birdwatcher and a dog walker, and then she took it to a really dark place.

“I think she should investigate why and how it happened,” he said.

.