Birdsville racing begins in the rural city of Australia, taking the population from 140 to 8,000

Visitors to the inner city experience not only the iconic race but also the land, the lifestyle and the local people (pictured)

Thousands of Australian runners are expected to head to the iconic Birdsville races this weekend, boosting the population of the small town inland from 140 to more than 8,000.

Traditionally held on the first Saturday of September, Birdsville is perhaps one of the most unique horse racing events in Australia, since there is no turf track, but rather a deserted dessert track.

The annual event, located between the Stony and Stuart & Stony deserts near the South Australian border, is often referred to as the "Melbourne Cup" of the interior, boasting that it has something for everyone.

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Visitors to the inner city experience not only the iconic race but also the land, the lifestyle and the local people (pictured)

Visitors to the inner city experience not only the iconic race but also the land, the lifestyle and the local people (pictured)

Amateur boxers fight (pictured) at Fred Brophy's Boxing Troupe, the last remaining traveling boxing tent, which takes place on the sidelines of the race track in a remote outback

Amateur boxers fight (pictured) at Fred Brophy's Boxing Troupe, the last remaining traveling boxing tent, which takes place on the sidelines of the race track in a remote outback

Amateur boxers fight (pictured) at Fred Brophy's Boxing Troupe, the last remaining traveling boxing tent, which takes place on the sidelines of the race track in a remote outback

Fashion plays a key role in the schedule of the event, but not all are black ties and gala dresses: race goers put their best foot forward in cheerful rags, from costumes to Wally costumes from Where & # 39; s Wally and inflatable beer

Fashion plays a key role in the schedule of the event, but not all are black ties and gala dresses: race goers put their best foot forward in cheerful rags, from costumes to Wally costumes from Where & # 39; s Wally and inflatable beer

Fashion plays a key role in the schedule of the event, but not all are black ties and dresses, and race goers put their best foot in cheerful rags, from elegant dresses to costumes (pictured) and costumes inflatable beer

Those attending the race at the annual event are known for their adventurous attire, including these people at their Where's Wally? costumes (pictured)

Those attending the race at the annual event are known for their adventurous attire, including these people at their Where's Wally? costumes (pictured)

Those attending the race at the annual event are known for their adventurous attire, including these people at their Where's Wally? costumes (pictured)

Race attendees in their matching pink suits (pictured) pose for a photo at the iconic Birdsville races in Queensland on August 31

Race attendees in their matching pink suits (pictured) pose for a photo at the iconic Birdsville races in Queensland on August 31

Race attendees in their matching pink suits (pictured) pose for a photo at the iconic Birdsville races in Queensland on August 31

From circus performers, fun family careers and boxing, to free movie screenings, sunset tours and bush dancing, the event offers something for everyone, and one of the most unique attractions is the presentation of diamond bra strap.

That said, fashion plays a key role in the timing of the event, but not all are black ties and gala dresses, and race attendees often come out with cheerful costumes ranging from elegant dresses to "Where's Wally? " suits and inflatable beer suits.

There are also many competitions for the best dressed fashions in the field, with prizes for different ages and sex groups. There is even a fashion for dogs outside the field event.

What began as an unofficial competition in 1882 among 150 owners, managers and ranchers, which raised almost £ 200 by public subscription, is now Queensland's largest horse racing competition in two days.

Back then, bets were settled as the nearby & # 39; Tucker & # 39; s Hotel & # 39; after the last race, but the event has grown by more than 4000 percent, with total prize money increasing from £ 200 to $ 200,000.

The race is so popular that previous events have attracted a number of special guests, including Pauline Hanson, who made a special appearance as a girl of the ring card in 2017.

The race is so popular that it grew by as much as 4,000 percent, and previous events attracted many special guests, including Pauline Hanson (center), who made a special appearance as a girl with a circle card in 2017.

The race is so popular that it grew by as much as 4,000 percent, and previous events attracted many special guests, including Pauline Hanson (center), who made a special appearance as a girl with a circle card in 2017.

The race is so popular that it grew by as much as 4,000 percent, and previous events attracted many special guests, including Pauline Hanson (center), who made a special appearance as a girl with a circle card in 2017.

Currently, up to 8,000 people are expected to attend Birdsville for a week-long program of events, including Betoota Races, Bedourie Races and Ute & Travelers & # 39; Muster, with the race itself (pictured here) ) as the featured event

Currently, up to 8,000 people are expected to attend Birdsville for a week-long program of events, including Betoota Races, Bedourie Races and Ute & Travelers & # 39; Muster, with the race itself (pictured here) ) as the featured event

Currently, up to 8,000 people are expected to attend Birdsville for a week-long program of events, including Betoota Races, Bedourie Races and Ute & Travelers & # 39; Muster, with the race itself (pictured here) ) as the featured event

The iconic Birdsville Races (pictured) have started again in Queensland, attracting people from all over the country, boosting the small town's population from the interior of 140 to more than 8,000

The iconic Birdsville Races (pictured) have started again in Queensland, attracting people from all over the country, boosting the small town's population from the interior of 140 to more than 8,000

The iconic Birdsville Races (pictured) have started again in Queensland, attracting people from all over the country, boosting the small town's population from the interior of 140 to more than 8,000

What began as an unofficial race in 1882 among 150 owners who raised nearly 200 pounds by public subscription, is now Queensland's richest two-day racehorse competition (pictured)

What began as an unofficial race in 1882 among 150 owners who raised nearly 200 pounds by public subscription, is now Queensland's richest two-day racehorse competition (pictured)

What began as an unofficial race in 1882 among 150 owners who raised nearly 200 pounds by public subscription, is now Queensland's richest two-day racehorse competition (pictured)

The Birdsville races (pictured) have grown by more than 4,000 percent, with a jackpot of cash prizes that has increased from £ 200 in 1882 to $ 200,000 today.

The Birdsville races (pictured) have grown by more than 4,000 percent, with a jackpot of cash prizes that has increased from £ 200 in 1882 to $ 200,000 today.

The Birdsville races (pictured) have grown by more than 4,000 percent, with a jackpot of cash prizes that has increased from £ 200 in 1882 to $ 200,000 today.

The event brings together all areas of life (in the image), including local residents of the interior and visitors from all over Australia and the world, for the quintessential Australian experience

Birdsville, an old rest stop and waterhole for ranchers who move their animals, has become a thriving modern community and home to the world-famous desert racing event.

Up to 8,000 people are expected to attend Birdsville this weekend to enjoy the rest of the week-long program of events, which includes Betoota Races, Bedourie Races and Ute & Travelers & # 39; Muster, with the race itself being the highlight.

The event brings together all areas of life, including local residents of the interior and visitors from across Australia and the world, for the quintessential Australian experience.

Visitors can experience the land, lifestyle and people of the Comarca de Diamantina first-hand, with the money raised from the event to support the community and raise funds for the Royal Flying Doctor Service in Queensland.

The Birdsville racing program continues through Sunday, September 2.

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