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Billionaire Airbnb CEO Says He Will Remotely Move From City to City Every Two Weeks

The billionaire founder and CEO of Airbnb has announced that from now on he will be working remotely from a number of different rental companies – while hopping from city to city.

Brian Chesky, 40, who is currently worth an estimated $12.3 billion, took to Twitter yesterday to announce his alternative way of working.

In a series of tweets, he outlined where he would be staying in the coming weeks and why he has chosen to work in so many different locations.

He wrote: “As of today, I live on Airbnb. I will be staying in a different town or city every few weeks.

Brian Chesky, 40, who is currently worth an estimated $12.3 billion, took to Twitter yesterday to announce that he would be staying at a number of Airbnbs as he toured the city.

Brian Chesky, 40, who is currently worth an estimated $12.3 billion, took to Twitter yesterday to announce that he would be staying at a number of Airbnbs as he toured the city.

In a series of tweets, Chesky explained that he planned to start in Atlanta but would visit San Francisco — and other places — while staying at a number of Airbnbs.

In a series of tweets, Chesky explained that he planned to start in Atlanta but would visit San Francisco — and other places — while staying at a number of Airbnbs.

In a series of tweets, Chesky explained that he planned to start in Atlanta but would visit San Francisco — and other places — while staying at a number of Airbnbs.

“I’m in Atlanta this week. I come back to San Francisco often, but for now my house will be an Airbnb somewhere.

‘Why am I doing this? I think the pandemic has brought about the biggest change in travel since the advent of commercial flying. For the first time, millions of people can now live anywhere.”

Chesky went on to explain that remote working has “disconnected” many people from the requirement to work in the office every day.

“We see this in our data,” he added. “From July to September, one in five nights was booked on Airbnb for stays of a month or more, and nearly half of the nights booked were for stays of a week or more.

“Last year, 100,000 Airbnb guests booked stays of three months or more. In 2022, I think the biggest trend in travel will be for people to spread out to thousands of cities and stay for weeks, months, or even entire seasons.

1642602841 907 Billionaire Airbnb CEO Says He Will Remotely Move From City

1642602841 907 Billionaire Airbnb CEO Says He Will Remotely Move From City

Chesky went on to explain that remote working has “disconnected” many people from the requirement to work in an office every day (stock image of the Airbnb logo)

“More people are moving abroad, others are traveling all summer and some are even canceling their lease and becoming digital nomads.

Cities and countries will compete to attract these telecommuters, and it will lead to a redistribution of where people travel and live.

“This trend is a kind of decentralization of life and is changing the identity of travel. So that’s why I live on Airbnb. It will be fun, but more importantly, it will help us improve the experience for people who can now live anywhere.”

According to the Future Personnel Report, the number of US citizens who will work from home will rise to 36.2 million by 2025.

And with fewer employees in the office due to the Covid pandemic, people took the opportunity to move more.

Airbnb posted a record profit of $2.2 billion in the third quarter of 2021 — a 36 percent increase compared to the same period in 2019, before the pandemic.

Last year, Airbnb quietly removed a clause from its 40-page terms of service to allow hosts and guests to sue the company for assault and sexual harassment that features in its listings.

Last year, Airbnb quietly removed a clause from its 40-page terms of service to allow hosts and guests to sue the company for assault and sexual harassment that features in its listings.

Last year, Airbnb quietly removed a clause from its 40-page terms of service to allow hosts and guests to sue the company for assault and sexual harassment that features in its listings.

Chesky founded Airbnb in 2008 with his roommates Nathan Blecharczyk and Joe Gebbia — both of whom have smaller stakes in the company than Chesky.

In 2020, the company went public, with its share price rising to $144, more than doubling its initial value.

Last year, Airbnb quietly removed a clause from its 40-page terms of service to allow hosts and guests to sue the company for assault and sexual harassment in the ads.

The clause — which required customers alleging assault or sexual harassment taking place at an Airbnb property to seek a judge to settle the dispute — had been buried in the terms for more than a decade.

The 150 million Airbnb users agreed to this clause when they registered for the site.

1642602844 134 Billionaire Airbnb CEO Says He Will Remotely Move From City

1642602844 134 Billionaire Airbnb CEO Says He Will Remotely Move From City

The 150 million Airbnb users agreed to the previous clause when they registered for the site. In a statement released last year alongside the change, Airbnb said it was “building trust” by “doing the right thing in the rare instances where things go wrong.”

In a statement released in August 2021, Airbnb said, “We announce that arbitration provisions will no longer apply to claims of assault or sexual harassment by hosts or guests in the next version of Airbnb’s Terms of Service.”

“We believe that survivors should be able to make claims in whatever forum is best for them,” the statement said.

It also “encouraged industry peers within the travel and hospitality industry to consider similar steps for their respective communities.”

Airbnb closed the statement by assuring hosts and guests that it “builds trust” by “doing the right thing on the rare occasions when things go wrong.”

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