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Biden will ask Congress for $32B to FUND police and combat crime in attempt to avoid GOP bloodbath

Joe Biden’s 2023 budget proposal includes $32 billion to fight rising crime in the US, according to two White House officials, despite years of calls from his party’s progressive wing to punish police.

Huge crime spikes, especially in cities, are a problem that could threaten the majority of Democrats in the upcoming midterm elections. In fact, Republicans are labeling the issue as widespread by the Democrats because of calls to abolish the police and rhetoric against law enforcement in general.

the officials tell Axios that Biden’s budget proposal would require $30 billion in new spending over the next decade to expand law enforcement and increase crime prevention.

The president’s proposal, which almost never passes Congress unchanged, will also include a $31 billion increase in defense spending, people familiar with the plan told The New York Times

His total request for national security spending will be $813.3 billion, including $4.1 billion for the Pentagon for defense research and development capabilities. According to the Times, nearly $5 billion will go toward a space missile warning system to detect threats and another $2 billion for a missile defense interceptor.

President Biden will lay out his fiscal year 2023 budget proposal Monday, along with newly sworn in office of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) director Shalanda Young. At the same time, his proposal lands on Capitol Hill for review and approval.

But the $20.6 billion for the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) discretionary spending on federal law enforcement, crime prevention and intervention is likely to be a point of tension with the far-left wings of the Democratic Party who have called for the complete abolition and dismantling of the police force. .

The new figure is $2 billion more than the $18.6 billion set by the DOJ this year.

President Joe Biden will propose in his fiscal year 2023 budget to reveal $32 billion in spending Monday to fund law enforcement and crime prevention programs, despite progressive calls to relieve the police

President Joe Biden will propose in his fiscal year 2023 budget to reveal $32 billion in spending Monday to fund law enforcement and crime prevention programs, despite progressive calls to relieve the police

Crime has increased over the past two years, especially in cities.  Pictured: New York City police patrol the entrance to the Museum of Modern Art after a multiple stabbing incident on March 12, 2022

Crime has increased over the past two years, especially in cities. Pictured: New York City police patrol the entrance to the Museum of Modern Art after a multiple stabbing incident on March 12, 2022

Discretionary spending goes toward more resources for federal prosecutors and for state and local law enforcement — including hiring more police. Biden’s proposal includes paying nearly 300 new deputy marshals.

In his first State of the Union address earlier this year, Biden pledged to fund the police as cities in particular face massive crime spikes.

“We should all agree – the answer is not to fund the police, but to fund the police,” he said during his remarks in early March. ‘Found them. Fund them. Fund them with resources and training.”

The proposed increase for police, Axios said, would double funding for community police through the COPS hiring program and add $500 million for community violence interventions.

Biden has tried to distance himself from progressive points of discussion that demean police and law enforcement, especially as voters express concerns about feeling unsafe in their communities.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, a retired police officer, met the president in his city in February to discuss rising crime and how to tackle it.

One point likely to infuriate Republicans on Capitol Hill is the addition of 140 new agents and investigators from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), who are investigating arms trafficking and could tackle Second Amendment rights .

The proposal would also add 160 ATF investigators to work on arms dealer compliance.

Crime in major cities in most areas increased between 2021 and 2022.  In New York City, the crime rate has increased by 18.3% in a year and by 17.4% for shooting victims in the same period

Crime in major cities in most areas increased between 2021 and 2022. In New York City, the crime rate has increased by 18.3% in a year and by 17.4% for shooting victims in the same period

1648476829 255 Biden will ask Congress for 32B to FUND police and

1648476830 300 Biden will ask Congress for 32B to FUND police and

Biden’s budget proposal is also reported to include a “billionaire tax” to help pay for the $1 trillion deficit reduction.

The minimum tax for the wealthiest Americans would require households worth more than $100 million to pay at least 20 percent of their income.

The White House plans to unveil the “minimum billionaire income tax” Monday as part of Biden’s 2023 budget plan, but it would have to go through Congress to become law, and will likely meet stiff opposition from some quarters.

The proposal aims to close an alleged loophole that will benefit the country’s more than 700 billionaires, many of whom have the bulk of their wealth in stock, which is not taxed until it is turned into a profit. sold.

A White House official told Axios, “The president’s budget will reflect three key values: fiscal responsibility, safety and security at home and abroad, and a commitment to build a better America.”

Presidents’ budgets are rarely fully accepted and become law, but are a way for the executive branch to formulate spending priorities and detail the White House agenda as a whole.

Workers in New York City said they were fed up with the rise in crime and homelessness in the city.  Out of 9,000 respondents, 84% said conditions in the city have deteriorated over the past two years

Workers in New York City said they were fed up with the rise in crime and homelessness in the city. Out of 9,000 respondents, 84% said conditions in the city have deteriorated over the past two years

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