Biden reportedly released his first round of judicial nominees

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President Joe Biden is reportedly preparing to release his first batch of judicial nominees, offering a glimpse into how he hopes to shape the federal judiciary.

Biden’s list could be released as soon as possible on Tuesday and features three black women, two of whom would be tapped for powerful seats on appeal, sources familiar with the case told Politico.

On the campaign trail, Biden promised to appoint a black woman to the Supreme Court should a vacancy arise during his tenure.

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson has long been considered one of Biden’s best options for filling a Supreme Court vacancy, and now he is strongly considering her filling the seat vacated by Attorney General Merrick Garland in the DC Circuit Court of Appeals.

Other names circulated for appeals court positions include Judge Leondra Kruge of the California Supreme Court and Judge Michelle Childs of the US District Court.

President Joe Biden is reportedly preparing to release his first batch of judicial nominees, offering a glimpse into how he hopes to shape the federal judiciary.

President Joe Biden is reportedly preparing to release his first batch of judicial nominees, offering a glimpse into how he hopes to shape the federal judiciary.

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson (above) has long been considered one of Biden's best options for filling a Supreme Court vacancy, and he is reportedly considering her for the mighty seat of the DC Circuit Court of Appeals that is abandoned by AG Merrick Garland

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson (above) has long been considered one of Biden's best options for filling a Supreme Court vacancy, and he is reportedly considering her for the mighty seat of the DC Circuit Court of Appeals that is abandoned by AG Merrick Garland

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson (above) has long been considered one of Biden’s best options for filling a Supreme Court vacancy, and he is reportedly considering her for the mighty seat of the DC Circuit Court of Appeals that is abandoned by AG Merrick Garland

The DC Appeals Court, which hears many complex federal cases, has long been seen as a pipeline to the Supreme Court, and such an appointment could put Jackson in the top spot in the highest court.

Biden began his tenure with 68 judicial vacancies, including seven court vacancies and 61 district court vacancies.

His first wave of nominees will face tough challenges in the equally divided Senate, where judicial confirmation votes for the lifelong federal bank are often contested.

Democrats narrowly control the Senate over Vice President Kamala Harris’s decisive vote, which could seal judicial confirmation if the fight failed strictly along party lines.

During the campaign, Biden pledged to raise a black woman to the Supreme Court, saying that “everyone should be represented – no one is better than me and I am no better than anyone else.”

Judge Leondra Kruge of the California Supreme Court

Judge Leondra Kruge of the California Supreme Court

Judge Michelle Childs of the United States Court

Judge Michelle Childs of the United States Court

Other names circulated for appeals court positions include Leondra Kruge, California Supreme Court Judge (left), and U.S. District Court Judge Michelle Childs (right).

“I look forward to having a black woman on the Supreme Court, to make sure that we actually get all the representation,” he said in a Democratic debate last February. Biden confirmed his promise after winning the election in November.

It is rumored that Jackson has been the first choice for Garland’s chair since January, and he was on Biden’s shortlist for the DC Apples Bench last week, sources told Politico.

Jackson, a Harvard-trained attorney and former public defender, has served on the district court since 2013, when she was appointed by Obama. She was confirmed by the Senate by ballot without a roll call.

She was considered by Obama for the 2016 Supreme Court nomination that eventually went to Garland, the confirmation of which was blocked by the Republican-controlled Senate in 2016.

Jackson, 50, has experience in sentencing reform after serving twice for the US Sentencing Commission, including as Obama-appointed vice chairman.

She had a varied career before becoming a judge, working as a lawyer in private practice and as a public defender.

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

DC District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

Judge Jackson (left and right), a Harvard-trained attorney and former public defender, has served on the district court since 2013, when she was appointed by Obama

Jackson once worked for Supreme Court Judge Stephen Breyer (above), of whom some liberal activists are now demanding to step down to make way for a younger and non-white judge.

Jackson once worked for Supreme Court Judge Stephen Breyer (above), of whom some liberal activists are now demanding to step down to make way for a younger and non-white judge.

Jackson once worked for Supreme Court Judge Stephen Breyer (above), of whom some liberal activists are now demanding to step down to make way for a younger and non-white judge.

Earlier in her career, Jackson worked for the Liberal Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

Now some progressive activists argue that Breyer must step down to make way for a more diverse jurisdiction appointed by Biden, while Democrats control the Senate.

Breyer is currently the oldest sitting Supreme Court judge and one of three staunchly liberal voices in the nine-member court.

“He must announce his retirement immediately, with the confirmation of his successor,” Professor Paul Campos at the University of Colorado wrote of Breyer in The New York Times earlier this month.

Breyer has remained silent about his plans, at least publicly. His last comment on the topic of retirement was in an interview published in Slate’s Dahlia Lithwick in December.

“I mean, eventually I’ll retire, I certainly will,” Breyer said. “And it’s hard to know exactly when.”