Home US Beyonce breaks silence over backlash for going country: Singer unveils Cowboy Carter album cover where she’s proudly holding an American flag and says, ‘Music can unite so many people around the world’

Beyonce breaks silence over backlash for going country: Singer unveils Cowboy Carter album cover where she’s proudly holding an American flag and says, ‘Music can unite so many people around the world’

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Beyoncé breaks silence following backlash over country move as singer unveils Cowboy Carter album cover where she proudly holds an American flag

Beyoncé has revealed the cover art for her highly anticipated country album Cowboy Carter – while speaking the negative reaction she received for entering the genre.

“Today marks the 10 day countdown to the release of Act II,” the Grammy winner began. “Thank you from the bottom of my heart to all the supporters of (the album’s singles) TEXAS HOLD ‘EM and 16 CARRIAGES.”

She continued, “I feel honored to be the first black woman with the number one single on the Hot Country Songs chart. This would not have happened without the support of each and every one of you.

The 42-year-old, born in Texas, added: “I hope that in a few years the mention of an artist’s race, as it relates to the distribution of musical genres, will no longer be relevant.”

Her album cover shows Beyoncé on horseback, waving an American flag while wearing a red, white and blue leather outfit with a silver Stetson.

Beyoncé breaks silence following backlash over country move as singer unveils Cowboy Carter album cover where she proudly holds an American flag

Beyoncé breaks silence following backlash over country move as singer unveils Cowboy Carter album cover where she proudly holds an American flag

She wears a huge silver wig that flutters in the breeze, as well as a sash with the name of the album draped across her front.

“This album was over five years in the making. This was born from an experience I had years ago where I didn’t feel welcome…and it was very clear that I wasn’t,” Beyoncé wrote in the caption.

“But, through this experience, I dove deeper into country music history and studied our rich music archives. It feels good to see how music can unite so many people around the world, while amplifying the voices of some of the people who have dedicated much of their lives to educating about our musical history.

She added: “The criticism I faced when I entered this genre forced me to break through the limits placed on me. Act II is the result of challenging myself and taking my time to bend and blend genres to create this body of work.

Beyoncé said: “I have a few surprises on the album and I’ve collaborated with some brilliant artists that I deeply respect. I hope you can hear my heart and soul and all the love and passion that I put into every detail and every sound.

She explained: “I focused on this album as a continuation of RENAISSANCE…I hope this music is an experience, creating another journey where you can close your eyes, start from the beginning and never stop.”

In conclusion, she wrote: “This is not a country album. This is a “Beyoncé” album. It’s act ii COWBOY CARTER, and I’m proud to share it with you all!’

Beyoncé, who grew up in Houston, made her first foray into the genre with a country-tinged song called Daddy Issues on her 2016 album Lemonade.

Beyoncé announced her country project last month, releasing two singles during the Super Bowl, 16 Carriages and Texas Hold 'Em.

Beyoncé announced her country project last month, releasing two singles during the Super Bowl, 16 Carriages and Texas Hold 'Em.

Beyoncé announced her country project last month, releasing two singles during the Super Bowl, 16 Carriages and Texas Hold ‘Em.

Both songs were hits, with Texas Hold 'Em debuting atop the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard Hot Country Songs.

Both songs were hits, with Texas Hold 'Em debuting atop the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard Hot Country Songs.

Both songs were hits, with Texas Hold ‘Em debuting atop the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard Hot Country Songs.

She delivered a controversial performance of the song at that year’s Country Music Association Awards, taking the stage with the girl group then known as The Dixie Chicks and since renamed The Chicks.

When the CMAs posted footage of the performance on their official social media channels, comments included attacks such as: “Beyoncé overrated racist n****rb***hs,” to the point that the videos were ultimately removed.

Fans demanded the videos be restored, but when they were reposted on Facebook, they received a new round of racist comments.

Beyoncé announced her new country project last month, releasing two singles during the Super Bowl, 16 Carriages and Texas Hold ‘Em.

Both songs were hits, with Texas Hold ‘Em debuting atop the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard Hot Country Songs.

The commercial success of Texas Hold ‘Em made Beyoncé the first black woman to have a country song reach number one on the Billboard charts.

Texas Hold ‘Em gave Beyonce the opportunity to provide a platform for black folk musician Rhiannon Giddens, who can be heard playing banjo on the track.

However, response to the singles was not uniformly positive, as Beyoncé was also violently denounced by rapper Azealia Banks.

Beyoncé, who grew up in Houston, made her first foray into the genre with a country-tinged song called Daddy Issues on her 2016 album Lemonade.

Beyoncé, who grew up in Houston, made her first foray into the genre with a country-tinged song called Daddy Issues on her 2016 album Lemonade.

Beyoncé, who grew up in Houston, made her first foray into the genre with a country-tinged song called Daddy Issues on her 2016 album Lemonade.

She delivered a controversial performance of the song at that year's Country Music Association Awards, taking the stage with the girl group then known as The Dixie Chicks.

She delivered a controversial performance of the song at that year's Country Music Association Awards, taking the stage with the girl group then known as The Dixie Chicks.

She delivered a controversial performance of the song at that year’s Country Music Association Awards, taking the stage with the girl group then known as The Dixie Chicks.

“Yes black girls can make country music…but you really don’t push the button…Beyoncé please stop this madness,” Banks wrote on Instagram.

“The gay attacks, the overtly narcissistic attempts to lazily encroach on a genre *you think* your popularity is going to earn you praise in… You look like a food sister,” added Banks, who developed a reputation for scathing. outspoken.

Shortly after, a source exclusively told DailyMail.com that Beyoncé had prepared for the possibility of a backlash against her country album.

“She knows there will be pushback from those who want her to stay in a narrow lane, but she doesn’t care,” the source said, explaining that Beyoncé hoped to highlight “the contributions of African-Americans in Society.” gender.’

Beyoncé was “motivated to make a country record after seeing how many of her fans loved her single Daddy Lessons and her performance at the CMAs.”

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