Best Charging Networks for Electric Car Drivers Revealed

Tesla’s Superchargers top a new survey of electric car owners about the best networks for charging their vehicle’s batteries.

Of the 1,000 EV owners who use it and What Car? They rated it very highly for reliability, loading speed, ease of payment and value for money, giving it an overall score of 89.8 percent – which is the best points achieved by any of the 12 rated providers.

The honor comes just over 24 hours after Telsa CEO Elon Musk confirmed that the US company will make its Supercharger network — currently exclusive to Telsa car owners — accessible to all electric vehicle owners.

Named the best public charging networks: Tesla’s Superchargers generally scored the best and scored high on reliability, charging speed, ease of payment and value for money

Tesla’s fast charging network includes more than 25,000 superchargers worldwide.

The US manufacturer confirmed in March that it has more than 600 in the UK, with more than 100 installed since last summer, when it celebrated its 500th supercharge in Britain in June 2020.

“We are opening our Supercharger network to other EVs later this year,” Musk said on Tuesday.

He later responded to another tweet confirming that Tesla’s charging network will be available to “other electric vehicles in all countries” over time.

While this may be the case for later this year, What Car? says Instavolt is the best network currently open to all electric vehicle owners.

Drivers said it was their favorite public charger because it is reliable, relatively fast and extremely easy to use.

It achieved an overall score of 81.2 percent and was the top-ranking network for reliability at 92.6 percent.

To find out which public electric car charging providers were the best, Which car? surveyed 1,000 drivers of electric and plug-in hybrid cars and asked them to rate networks for reliability, whether they were easy to reach and park, whether they offered fast charging speeds and value for money, and whether they were easy to use and operate. were to pay.

The car title also visited at least one charging location for each of the 12 companies included in the results to get a snapshot of how good they were.

The overall ratings are based on the combination of these two data sources.

The honor comes just hours after Telsa CEO Elon Musk confirmed that the US company will make its Supercharger network — currently exclusive to Telsa car owners — accessible to all electric vehicle owners later this year.

The honor comes just hours after Telsa CEO Elon Musk confirmed that the US company will make its Supercharger network — currently exclusive to Telsa car owners — accessible to all electric vehicle owners later this year.

HOW TO COMPARE PUBLIC CHARGING NETWORKS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES?
Company Network Reliability Place Charging speed Value for your money Payment convenience Total score
1 Tesla 83.7% 74.3% 95.5% 95.5% 100% 89.8%
2 Instavolt 92.6% 63.5% 79.0% 71.0% 100% 81.2%
3 Osprey 80.6% 71.3% 61.7% 69.8% 100% 76.7%
4 charging shell 75.0% 53.5% 91.7% 57.5% 100% 75.5%
5 Pod point 70.3% 69.9% 54.7% 93.0% 70.00% 71.6%
6 Gridserve Electric Highway 23.7% 74.9% 84.6% 67.6% 100% 70.2%
7 BP pulse 36.9% 45.0% 87.2% 52.0% 100% 64.2%
8 ionity 60.6% 61.4% 95.3% 19.5% 70.00% 61.4%
9 engie 53.8% 54.5% 59.5% 91.9% 40.00% 59.9%
10 Charge Place Scotland 55.0% 63.7% 60.5% 90.9% 20.00% 58.0%
11 GeniusPoint 58.5% 34.6% 55.0% 70.8% 70.00% 57.8%
12 Charge your car 26.6% 34.4% 49.2% 67.2% 40.00% 43.5%
Source: Which car? survey among 1,000 EV drivers

Gridserve’s Electric Highway received the highest score of 74.9 percent for location, although the highway network was rated the worst for reliability, scoring just 23.7 percent.

However, Gridserve has only recently taken responsibility for Ecotricity’s electric highway, which has been criticized by EV owners for failing to replace expired appliances.

Gridserve has promised to revamp every location by the end of this year9742127, so next year is expected to do better in What Car? survey.

When it comes to charging speed, Tesla led the way, scoring 95.5 percent, closely followed by Ionity at 95.3 percent — both providers offer charging speeds in excess of 200 kW.

To find out which public electric car charging providers were the best, Which car?  surveyed 1,000 electric and plug-in hybrid drivers

To find out which public electric car charging providers were the best, Which car? surveyed 1,000 electric and plug-in hybrid drivers

EV owners were asked to rate networks for reliability, whether they were easy to reach and park, whether they offered fast charging speed and value for money, and whether they were easy to use and pay for.

EV owners were asked to rate networks for reliability, whether they were easy to reach and park, whether they offered fast charging speed and value for money, and whether they were easy to use and pay for.

Tesla’s fixed charge rate of 28p per kWh also helped it achieve the best value for money, while Ionity’s 69p per kWh rate gave it a rating of just 19.5 percent, the worst in What Car? data.

Steve Huntingford, editor at What Car?, said the poll highlighted the “significant differences between public electric car charging networks.”

He added: ‘Those that offer the fastest charging speeds aren’t necessarily the best to use, and some of the most affordable can also be the most inaccessible.

“As more people switch to electric cars, the demand for public chargers will increase, and electric vehicle owners really need to shop around to find the best charging solutions.”

Charge your car placed at the bottom because the chargers were considered unreliable

Charge your car placed at the bottom because the chargers were considered unreliable

The easiest networks to use — according to electric car drivers — were those that allowed drivers to tap and pay and not require them to register, while those with glitchy apps, lengthy sign-up processes, or a requirement to use a physical charging card to charge a card. charge point were rated lower in this area.

Worst of all was Charge Place Scotland, which has a complex registration process and took 10 days to send a charge card, without which you can’t access the network.

However, it was Charge Your Car that finished last as the charging stations were deemed unreliable and in What Car? were often blocked by other vehicles because they were on the roadside without dedicated parking spaces for electric cars.

It scored just 26.6 percent for reliability and 34.4 percent for location, and managed just 43.5 percent overall.

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