Bernie Sanders Supports Gavin Newsom in California Recall

Bernie Sanders backs Gavin Newsom in California recall so he can address climate crisis and immigration reform and because ‘the last thing we need is a right-wing Republican governor’

  • Sanders said voters should come to Newsom to fight climate change, ensure universal health care and implement immigration reform
  • Sanders significantly outperformed all other California Democrats in the 2020 presidential primaries, and his support could help turn progressives
  • 46 people are vying to replace Newsom, and radio host Larry Elder has emerged as the GOP frontrunner

Weeks before the California recall race, Senator Bernie Sanders throws his weight behind Gov. Gavin Newsom.

“At this unprecedented moment in American history, when we are trying to address the climate change crisis, ensure health care for all, and implement genuine immigration reforms, the last thing we need is a right-wing Republican governor in California. ‘ said the Vermont Democratic Socialist in a video ad released Monday.

“The recall of Governor Newsom on Sept. 14 is a brutal republican coup,” he added. ‘Don’t let it happen. Please.’

Sanders significantly outperformed all other California Democrats in the 2020 presidential primaries, and his support could help them become progressives at the polls on Sept. 14.

Last week, Vice President Kamala Harris halted his campaign for governor amid the crisis unfolding in Afghanistan as Newsom’s popularity plummeted in the polls.

So far, 46 people are vying to replace Newsom, and radio host Larry Elder has emerged as the GOP frontrunner. Reality star and ex-Olympian Caitlyn Jenner, 2018 Republican governor candidate John Cox and former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer have also thrown their names into the race.

At least 46 people are vying to replace Governor Gavin Newsom, above, whose popularity has waned since his sweeping victory in 2018

Newsom is fighting for his political life in a recall scheduled for September 14

Newsom is fighting for his political life in a recall scheduled for September 14

“The recall of Governor Newsom on Sept. 14 is a brutal republican coup,” he added. ‘Don’t let it happen. Please,” Sanders said in a new ad for the governor of California

Newsom was elected with overwhelming support in 2018, but his popularity waned after his handling of the Covid pandemic, which left schools closed for nearly the entire pandemic and amid the worsening homeless crisis and the state’s high cost of living.

A GOP victory would be a major shock in the Golden State, where Democrats outnumber Republicans by two to one. But Newsom’s rule is looking increasingly vague in the polls – a recent one YouGov poll found that 48% of likely voters wanted to recall the governor, 52% wanted to keep him in place.

If more than 50% of voters answer yes to a recall, the candidate with the highest number of votes will succeed Newsom.

President Biden also planned to campaign for governor before the Taliban took over Afghanistan, but those plans are now up in the air.

It’s not clear whether Biden’s support could be helpful to the governor at this point, given the president’s declining popularity as a result of his approach to the withdrawal from Afghanistan, especially after 13 military personnel and 170 people died in a suicide bombing in Kabul. last week.

Fighting for his political life, Newsom recalled how he used to be “the lucky one” in an interview with The Atlantic Ocean on Friday.

“I was always the lucky one,” he said. “Just the whole damn thing turned me around.”

Last month, Newsom said he would have “no damn thing” if the recall were successful. But on Friday, he seemed more aware of the polls and said he would regret his recent policy initiatives if he is impeached.

“If they throw me out. I’m going to feel good about what we just did, and I’ll never regret it,” he told the Sacramento Bee on July 30, adding that he is particularly proud of his record-breaking spending on education. ‘We put everything out on this education budget.’

“If I do fall short, I’m going to fucking regret all those decisions. And I don’t want to regret that I marketed everything and did what I think is right and what I think is in the best interests of California,” he told The Atlantic.

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