Beloved pets can now be converted to PEARLS after they have died

Beloved pets can now be immortalized after they have died with relatives whom they have turned into PEARLS

  • The Japanese cosmetic company WBE uses bone fragments and turns them into pearls
  • The Nagasaki-based company can produce a pearl in a year for a price of £ 3,300
  • Intended to provide a unique way to preserve the memory of a beloved pet
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People who mourn the loss of a pet can now turn their remains into a pearl necklace to perpetuate their beloved companion.

The Japanese cosmetics company WBE, based in Nagasaki, has developed a new method to grow a cultured pearl from a bone fragment.

It takes a year of slow growth to fully develop and costs a total of £ 3,300.

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The Japanese cosmetics company WBE, based in Nagasaki, has developed a new method to grow a cultured pearl from the bone fragment of a dog (stock)

The Japanese cosmetics company WBE, based in Nagasaki, has developed a new method to grow a cultured pearl from the bone fragment of a dog (stock)

& # 39; If we can calm the grief of owners who have lost their pets, we will be happy & # 39 ;, said Tomoe Masuda, head of the cosmetics company WBE, to the Japanese newspaper. Yomiuri Shimbun.

There are many ways to immortalize a pet, with some owners even cloning their deceased animals.

A facility in Seoul, South Korea offers the possibility to clone a dog for a total of £ 77,000 based on & # 39; no dog, no costs & # 39 ;.

Other bizarre funeral rituals have spread to people, with some people now opting to become a gem or a plant.

Some companies also offer the possibility of having remains in space.

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Commercial cultivation of pearls is nothing new for Japan, where the method was first developed a century ago.

The Nagasaki-based company can produce a pearl in a year for a price of £ 3,300 and says it is intended to provide a unique way to preserve the memory of a beloved pet (stock)

The Nagasaki-based company can produce a pearl in a year for a price of £ 3,300 and says it is intended to provide a unique way to preserve the memory of a beloved pet (stock)

The Nagasaki-based company can produce a pearl in a year for a price of £ 3,300 and says it is intended to provide a unique way to preserve the memory of a beloved pet (stock)

HOW DO OYSTERS DO PEARLS?

Pearls are the result of a biological process in which oysters protect themselves against foreign substances.

Cockles and mussels have the same process, but finding pearls is much rarer.

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When a foreign invader penetrates the layers of an oyster, it irritates the inner layer of the shell.

This causes the oyster to make mother-of-pearl, which covers the inside of the bowl to cover it up and stop the irritation.

This process ultimately forms a sufficiently large down payment to form a pearl.

They can be spherical or uneven, depending on how the mother-of-pearl is layered.

But the emergence of technology that can turn a pet into a pearl for a fraction of the cost of other funeral rituals can lead to more owners making their animal companions immortal.

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It was a scheme led by Yoshiki Matsushita, a professor at the Fisheries and Environmental Sciences University of Nagasaki University, who was destroyed when his own dog died.

The sadness of the departure of the ten-year-old dog, a Jack Russel named Ran, inspired the project.

A bone fragment of the pet is contained in a resin ball because it is less likely to be rejected by the oyster.

These are then slowly cared for by the oyster until it is large enough to be used as jewelry.

& # 39; Every pearl has its own character, since my dog ​​Ran had his own character. He has become a unique darling, & he said.

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