Being a winner makes men more likely to cheat on their spouse

Researchers have discovered that men experience an increase in testosterone when they believe they have beaten another man in something, causing some to see themselves as a

Winning a competition can really fuel a man's ego, to the extent that he is more likely to cheat on his partners, a new study suggests.

Researchers have discovered that men experience an increase in testosterone when they believe they have defeated another man in something, causing some to see themselves as a more valuable "sexual perspective".

And, everything boils down to the belief that they have won, unlike the actual effort of the task itself.

The study showed that winning causes hormonal fluctuations in men that can influence their sexual behavior and make them more likely to approach attractive women.

Researchers have discovered that men experience an increase in testosterone when they believe they have defeated another man in something, causing some to see themselves as a more valuable "sexual prospect".

In the new study at the University of Cambridge, researchers measured men's hormone levels and self-perceived attractiveness, along with their confidence in approaching attractive women.

Thirty-eight men in their twenties were surveyed before and after competing in hand-to-hand competitions against other men on rowing machines.

But, the competitions were rigged to select a random winner, regardless of who was really stronger.

This revealed that believing that they had won was enough for men to experience and increase testosterone levels and self-esteem.

In turn, this altered their sexual behavior.

"A large part of evolution consists of offsets in energy investment," says lead author Dr. Danny Longman.

"A common compensation for men both within and between species is between mating strategies.A reproductive approach is short-term, investing time and energy in attracting and pursuing many partners and fighting competition.

"Another approach is long-term, investing energy in raising offspring with a single partner.

"We discovered that a perceived change in the social state can cause male physiology to adapt by preparing to change mating strategies to optimize reproductive success."

Men who thought they won the competition saw an average testosterone increase of 4.9 percent, according to the researchers.

According to the researchers, the feeling of winning against another man causes a change in their sexual strategies, pushing them towards short-term thinking. Stock image

According to the researchers, the feeling of winning against another man causes a change in their sexual strategies, pushing them towards short-term thinking. Stock image

According to the researchers, the feeling of winning against another man causes a change in their sexual strategies, pushing them towards short-term thinking. Stock image

On the other hand, testosterone plummeted in those who thought they had lost, falling by an average of 7.24 percent.

This made an average difference of 14.46 percent in testosterone levels between those who thought they were winning and those who thought they had lost.

And, although losing did not affect the self-perceived value of men as a partner or confidence in approaching women, winning had a significant impact.

Men who were crowned winners were 11.29 percent more likely to approach attractive women to "instigate sexual intercourse".

Their self-perceived couple value also increased by 6.53 percent.

The tests, the researchers explained, were designed to mimic social and sexual competence as it was essentially a demonstration of strength.

HOW DID THE CITATION ONLINE SO POPULAR?

The first incarnation of a dating application dates back to 1995 when Match.com was launched for the first time.

The website allows single people to upload a profile, a photo and chat with people online.

The application was intended to allow people seeking long-term relationships to meet.

eHarmony was developed in 2000 and two years later Ashley Madison was launched for the first time, a site dedicated to infidelity and cheating.

A plethora of other dating sites with a single demographic goal was established in the next 10-15 years, including: OKCupid (2004), Plenty of Fish (2006), Grindr (2009) and Happn (2013).

In 2012, Tinder was launched and was the first dating platform based on & # 39; slip & # 39 ;.

After its initial launch, its use was multiplied by the snows and in March 2014 there were a billion matches per day all over the world.

In 2014, Tinder co-founder Whitney Wolfe Herd launched Bumble, a dating application that empowers women by allowing women to send the first message.

The popularity of mobile dating apps such as Tinder, Badoo and, more recently, Bumble can be attributed to an increasing number of younger users with a tight schedule.

In the 1990s, there was a stigma attached to online dating, as it was considered a last desperate attempt to find love.

This belief has dissipated and now around a third of marriages are between couples who met online.

A 2014 survey found that 84 percent of users of the dating application were using online dating services to seek a romantic relationship.

Twenty-four percent said they used online dating applications explicitly for sexual encounters.

"The victory in the rowing contest strongly implies the possession of greater physical strength than the opponent, a trait that women value in our evolutionary past when choosing a partner," Longman said.

According to the researchers, the feeling of winning against another man causes a change in their mating strategies, pushing them towards short-term thinking.

"The endocrine system that controls hormones is sensitive to situational changes," Longman said.

"Previous research has shown that testosterone is lower when men are in a committed relationship, or have children, to promote long-term mating strategies.

"Our results show that both testosterone and its corresponding psychological effects can fluctuate rapidly and opportunistically, switching to short-term mating in response to a perceived change in state that can increase mating value."

However, the researcher adds: "Male physiology can change to take advantage of certain situations, but ultimately, a man's decisions depend on him."

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