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Beijing is proposing legislation to oblige citizens to wear masks

Beijing proposes a law ordering citizens to wear public masks and cover their faces when coughing or sneezing

  • Legislators today tabled a bill in a committee meeting
  • Anti-coronavirus rules have been added to the new bill for the second revision
  • Residents should also cover their face when coughing or sneezing
  • Civilians who disobey the law face ‘severe financial penalties’
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Beijing officials have proposed a new law to force citizens to wear face masks in public during the coronavirus pandemic.

Local legislators today submitted a draft of the “Beijing Promotion Rules of Civilized Ways of Beijing” for the second revision at a committee meeting.

Anti-coronavirus rules were added to the newly proposed law, which ordered residents with flu symptoms to wear face masks in public and cover their faces when they cough or sneeze, even after the crisis is over.

It was because Beijing registered a total of 150 imported cases, which raised fears of a second wave of the outbreak hitting the nation.

Beijing officials have proposed a new law to force citizens to wear face masks in public during the coronavirus pandemic. A Chinese air passenger is wearing a face mask in Shanghai

Beijing officials have proposed a new law to force citizens to wear face masks in public during the coronavirus pandemic. A Chinese air passenger is wearing a face mask in Shanghai

Anti-coronavirus rules were added to the newly proposed law, which instructed residents with flu symptoms to wear face masks in public and to cover their faces when coughing or sneezing. Travelers wearing face masks were spotted at Beijing train station yesterday

Anti-coronavirus rules were added to the newly proposed law, which instructed residents with flu symptoms to wear face masks in public and to cover their faces when coughing or sneezing. Travelers wearing face masks were spotted at Beijing train station yesterday

Anti-coronavirus rules were added to the newly proposed law, which instructed residents with flu symptoms to wear face masks in public and to cover their faces when coughing or sneezing. Travelers wearing face masks were spotted at Beijing train station yesterday

The proposal was initially submitted in late October last year, but officials decided to re-draft the bill in March in response to the virus outbreak.

Other new requirements included using public spoons and chopsticks when sharing a meal, as well as outlawing illegal wildlife trade.

Citizens who break the rules face “severe financial penalties,” but it is unclear how many fines they receive, the media said.

Chinese officials have ordered people to wear face masks regularly during the outbreak as a precaution to catch the coronavirus. Residents should also keep a minimum distance of 1.5 meters (4.92 feet) from each other in public.

However, a medical expert told MailOnline that masks can “not” protect against the virus and wearing it can make it even worse.

Meanwhile, Public Health England has warned that there is “very little evidence” that masks are effective “outside of clinical settings” such as hospitals.

Citizens who break the rules face “severe financial penalties,” but it is unclear how many fines they receive, the media said. A woman with a face mask looks through the window of a train at Hongqiao Railway Station in Shanghai

Chinese officials have ordered people to wear face masks regularly during the outbreak as a precaution to catch the coronavirus. The photo shows a woman wearing a face mask as a precaution walking along a street mural in Hong Kong

Chinese officials have ordered people to wear face masks regularly during the outbreak as a precaution to catch the coronavirus. The photo shows a woman wearing a face mask as a precaution walking along a street mural in Hong Kong

Chinese officials have ordered people to wear face masks regularly during the outbreak as a precaution to catch the coronavirus. The photo shows a woman wearing a face mask as a precaution walking along a street mural in Hong Kong

Restaurants and canteens in China also launched a “one person per table” policy to prevent the spread of the coronavirus after citizens left their homes and returned to normal.

It was because millions of Chinese residents were allowed to leave Hubei yesterday after officials lifted a two-month shutdown at the former coronavirus epicenter.

Some of China’s most popular tourist sites are also resuming their business after being closed for almost two months to stop the spread of the new coronavirus.

Some of China's most popular tourist sites resume their business after being closed for almost two months to stop the spread of the new coronavirus. Two Chinese children wear protective masks when they visit the Badaling Great Wall in Beijing on March 24

Some of China's most popular tourist sites resume their business after being closed for almost two months to stop the spread of the new coronavirus. Two Chinese children wear protective masks when they visit the Badaling Great Wall in Beijing on March 24

Some of China’s most popular tourist sites resume their business after being closed for almost two months to stop the spread of the new coronavirus. Two Chinese children wear protective masks when they visit the Badaling Great Wall in Beijing on March 24

But one of China’s top coronavirus experts has warned that the nation is breaking out for the second time due to the increasing number of infections discovered among newcomers from abroad.

Professor Li Lanjuan, a member of Beijing’s expert team on the virus, said she was “very concerned that imported cases could cause another large-scale epidemic in our country.”

Meanwhile, the Spanish coronavirus death toll has surpassed China’s official figure today and has become the second highest in the world.

Worldwide, there are 460,000 confirmed cases and more than 20,000 deaths and more than 110,000 convalescent people, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Chinese city launches law to regulate the use of cutlery in restaurants to curb the corona virus

An East Chinese city, Taizhou, has recently introduced new rules that encourage people to use public spoons and chopsticks when sharing food with others.

Traditionally, Chinese people share a table of dishes instead of ordering for themselves when they eat in a group.

People also serve food with their own chopsticks and spoons, which might spread saliva droplets on the shared dishes.

The local government believes that using public spoons and chopsticks would reduce the risk of spreading the coronavirus.

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