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Before and after photos you can see a 40-year-old athlete who has been in a coma for 25 days

Shockingly before and after photos of a tense 40-year-old athlete who was placed in a coma for 25 days after being tested positive for the coronavirus, prove that even the most fit people have to fight for their lives if they tackle the deadly virus.

Ahmad Ayyad was 215 pounds of muscle on a sturdy 6’1 ‘frame before testing positive with COVID-19 on March 15. By the time he was to be fired from the Johns Hopkins Hospital on April 22 he would lose 60 pounds.

“The day I woke up, I was 153 pounds,” he explained in an interview on the hospital’s website. “My legs and arms were thin and my chest was gone. I couldn’t believe how hard it was to just stand by the edge of the bed. ‘

Ahmad Ayyad was 215 pounds of muscle on a sturdy 6'1 'frame before testing positive with COVID-19 on March 15.

By the time he was released from Johns Hopkins Hospital on April 22, he would lose 60 pounds.

By the time he was released from Johns Hopkins Hospital on April 22, he would lose 60 pounds.

Ahmad Ayyad was 215 pounds of muscle on a sturdy 6’1 ‘frame before testing positive with COVID-19 on March 15. By the time he was released from Johns Hopkins Hospital on April 22, he would lose 60 pounds

Before getting the coronavirus, the 40-year-old spent his time challenging challenging obstacle courses and spending hours lifting weights in DC and basketball gyms.

When not working out, the fourth of nine children worked in his family’s furniture business.

Ayyad began to feel symptoms related to the virus on March 11, just days after returning from a trip to Florida. He tried to recover by resting and eating shorbat adas – a lentil soup popular in the Middle East – but found that it did little to alleviate his symptoms.

When not working out, the fourth of nine children worked in his family's furniture business. Ayyad began to feel symptoms related to the virus on March 11

When not working out, the fourth of nine children worked in his family's furniture business. Ayyad began to feel symptoms related to the virus on March 11

When not working out, the fourth of nine children worked in his family’s furniture business. Ayyad began to feel symptoms related to the virus on March 11

On March 14, the athlete struggled to catch his breath and couldn’t even get to the local hospital. A friendly doctor with Ayyad convinced him to go to Uber the next day at Sibley Memorial Hospital.

It was there that Ayyad tested positive for both COVID-19 and Influenza A. He was ventilated and transferred to Johns Hopkins as his breathing deteriorated.

He would become the third patient in the hospital with coronavirus and the first to be placed on a ventilator

He would become the third patient in the hospital with coronavirus and the first to be placed on a ventilator

He would become the third patient in the hospital with coronavirus and the first to be placed on a ventilator

He would become the hospital’s third patient with coronavirus and the first to be placed on a ventilator, according to Dr. Natalie West. Dr. West was the lung specialist who hospitalized Ayyad.

Ayyad communicated by taking notes because he was unable to speak because of the ventilation pipes.

“We had quite a conversation with me as he spoke and he wrote,” said West. “The last thing he wrote on that piece of paper was,” Thank you very much for taking care of me. “It brought tears to my eyes. He just seemed like a very sweet and kind person. ‘

Soon, however, Ayyad fever would put him in a comatose state and should have his breathing assisted by a ventilator. Heavily sedated but delirious, he once removed his vent tube after getting agitated.

After the tube was removed a second time, doctors determined that he felt well enough not to need a tracheostomy.

And while he was in a coma, his parents called every day to check in with their oldest son.

“My mom left a voicemail the day I went to the IC,” Ayyad said. “It was heartbreaking, and she said,” Please call me, let me know you’re fine. “She didn’t believe my dad when he said they couldn’t visit me. She thought he was only trying to protect her to see me in a coma. ‘

And while he was in a coma, his parents called every day to check in with their oldest son

And while he was in a coma, his parents called every day to check in with their oldest son

And while he was in a coma, his parents called every day to check in with their oldest son

A few days after Ayyad was pulled out of the tube a second time, he was eventually transferred to a COVID-19 ward at the hospital. When he left the ICU in a wheelchair, nurses clapped and celebrated for him.

“Everyone at ICU was great,” he said. “I really feel for them and appreciate everything they do. I hate that caring for me puts them at risk. ‘

Ayyad’s progress after ICU was followed by Dr. Gigi Liu, a hospital physician and point-of-care ultrasound specialist, described that the patient was so motivated to get better that he walked through his hospital room in a few days.

The man was fired from John Hopkins on April 22 with a blood clot on his left arm and damage to his lungs and heart. He has gradually reduced the weight he lost

The man was fired from John Hopkins on April 22 with a blood clot on his left arm and damage to his lungs and heart. He has gradually reduced the weight he lost

The man was fired from John Hopkins on April 22 with a blood clot on his left arm and damage to his lungs and heart. He has gradually reduced the weight he lost

“There is a certain group who, once they are on a ventilator for some time, are having a hard time coming back,” said Liu. “It wasn’t Ayyad. He was a super duper-fit guy for all of this. I think that helped him. ‘

The man was fired from John Hopkins on April 22 with a blood clot on his left arm and damage to his lungs and heart. He has gradually reduced the weight he lost.

Ayyad immediately wanted to move in with his parents as soon as he was discharged, but Dr. Liu advised against the gesture – emphasizing that the patient isolates himself for two weeks.

“He asked if he could hug and kiss them afterward,” Liu said. “I know he really wanted to, but we don’t know enough yet about this disease and if the virus will still go away, even though he tested negative twice. I saw tears in his eyes when I said no. That was all I disappointed him. ‘

Once back at his home in DC, Ayyad’s parents were waiting on the sidewalk for his return. They had already refilled his referee gerator.

“I get better and better every day,” Ayyad said. “I’m slowly regaining my weight. I eat a lot; I take walks outside. ‘

He described the deadly virus as one of the most difficult things he has ever had to endure.

“I get the flu every year and I have two or three days down and then I am better,” he said. “This is not the flu. People have to be careful and know that it can happen to anyone. ‘

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