Beautiful pictures show beautiful 800 year old golden chains recovered from a Chinese SHIPWRECK

Two beautiful and amazingly preserved gold chains found in an 800-year-old shipwreck have been exhibited at the Guangdong Museum in China, along with various other objects from the Song Dynasty.

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The ship, called the Nanhai I, was first discovered by a joint Sino-British diving expedition in 1987 – although it would take another two decades for the ship to be safely brought to the surface for study.

The merchant loaded with goods is the largest and oldest known ship in China, which had traveled from China to the Indian Ocean along the & # 39; Maritime Silk Route & # 39; when it came under the coast.

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Two beautiful and amazingly preserved gold chains found in an 800-year-old shipwreck have been exhibited at the Guangdong Museum in China, along with varied other objects from the Song Dynasty.

Two beautiful and amazingly preserved gold chains found in an 800-year-old shipwreck have been exhibited at the Guangdong Museum in China, along with varied other objects from the Song Dynasty.

WHAT WAS THE MARITIME SIDEAP?

The Maritime Silk Route helped to connect the east and the west

The Maritime Silk Route helped to connect the east and the west

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The Maritime Silk Route helped to connect the east and the west

The Maritime Silk Route was the part over the sea of ​​the old trade route that connected China with the West.

The road flourished between the 2nd century BCE and the 15th century CE.

It crossed various bodies of water, including the South China Sea, the Strait of Malacca, the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Sea, the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea.

In the east, the trade network also reached the East China and Yellow Sea, forging connections with the Korean peninsula and the Japanese archipelago.

The chains can be seen in the recently opened exhibition & # 39; The Sea Route: Nanhai I Shipwreck and Maritime Trade in the Southern Song Dynasty & # 39 ;, presented at the Guangdong Museum in Guangzhou, China.

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I – which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; – was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, Guangdong province, in August 1987.

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The remains of the ship are one of the largest and oldest shipwrecks in China, dating from the time of the Song Dynasty that lasted from 960 to 1229 AD.

The divers were looking for a sunken VOC craft, the Rimsburge, when they staggered over the other sunken ship.

& # 39; The most likely scenario is that the ship was overloaded. Or it died in a storm, & # 39; said director of the Chinese Institute of Underwater Archeology, Jiang Bo UNESCO Courier.

The exceptionally well-preserved old ship was a merchant ship in the sea with a large hull capacity, about 72 feet (22 meters) long and about 30 feet (9 meters) wide.

Sun Jian, technical director of the Underwater Cultural Heritage Protection Center, told the Hindu that the Nanhai I & # 39; was a short and thick model that was widely used in ancient times, designed with high safety standards, a good ability to withstand waves And a large cargo load. & # 39;

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Although the wreck was buried under mud for about eight centuries, the hull of the Nanhai I retained its integrity, while retaining tens of thousands of ancient relics in its grip.

While the ship was only submerged to a depth of 23 meters, the expansion of the finds and the turbid water made the recovery of the ship and the load challenging.

The original joint diving mission discovered by the wreck had at the time attempted to remove objects from the seabed and, although they had managed to lift a number of objects, they accidentally destroyed the back of the ship during the process.

Fortunately, the location of the Nanhai I close to the Chinese coast protected it from looting until the barrel could be better restored.

The ship, called the Nanhai I, was first discovered by a joint Sino-British diving expedition in 1987 - although it would take another two decades for the ship to be safely brought to the surface for study.

The ship, called the Nanhai I, was first discovered by a joint Sino-British diving expedition in 1987 - although it would take another two decades for the ship to be safely brought to the surface for study.

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The ship, called the Nanhai I, was first discovered by a joint Sino-British diving expedition in 1987 – although it would take another two decades for the ship to be safely brought to the surface for study.

The merchant loaded with goods is the largest and oldest known ship in China, which had traveled from China to the Indian Ocean along the & # 39; Maritime Silk Road & # 39; when it came under the coast

The merchant loaded with goods is the largest and oldest known ship in China, which had traveled from China to the Indian Ocean along the & # 39; Maritime Silk Road & # 39; when it came under the coast

The merchant loaded with goods is the largest and oldest known ship in China, which had traveled from China to the Indian Ocean along the & # 39; Maritime Silk Road & # 39; when it came under the coast

The chains can be seen in the recently opened exhibition & # 39; The Sea Route: Nanhai I Shipwreck and Maritime Trade in the Southern Song Dynasty & # 39 ;, presented at the Guangdong Museum in Guangzhou, China

The chains can be seen in the recently opened exhibition & # 39; The Sea Route: Nanhai I Shipwreck and Maritime Trade in the Southern Song Dynasty & # 39 ;, presented at the Guangdong Museum in Guangzhou, China

The chains can be seen in the recently opened exhibition & # 39; The Sea Route: Nanhai I Shipwreck and Maritime Trade in the Southern Song Dynasty & # 39 ;, presented at the Guangdong Museum in Guangzhou, China

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After nine months of preparation, the entire shipwreck was lifted off the seabed on December 21, 2007 and transferred to the purpose-built Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong.

The old ship is kept in a giant aquarium, the environment in which the exact water temperature and quality is reproduced as the environment on the seabed where the ship was discovered.

The careful extraction was carried out with the aid of a water-resistant case of 5,500 tonnes, large enough to collect the entire shipwreck, which was pressed into the seabed around the wreck before the surrounding mud was removed and a foot was inserted.

The operation, carried out by the Chinese government of cultural heritage and transportation, cost around $ 20 million (£ 16 million).

Not only have the Nanhai I and its contents been preserved at the Maritime Silk Road Museum, but visitors to the complex have been able to observe the excavations of the elevated ship in real time, as they are executed in the glass crystal of the museum. palace & # 39 ;.

After nine months of preparation, the entire shipwreck was lifted off the seabed on December 21, 2007 and transferred to the purpose-built Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong (photo)

After nine months of preparation, the entire shipwreck was lifted off the seabed on December 21, 2007 and transferred to the purpose-built Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong (photo)

After nine months of preparation, the entire shipwreck was lifted off the seabed on December 21, 2007 and transferred to the purpose-built Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong (photo)

The old ship is kept in a giant aquarium (photo), the environment inside is set to mimic the exact water temperature and quality as the environment on the seabed where the ship was discovered

The old ship is kept in a giant aquarium (photo), the environment inside is set to mimic the exact water temperature and quality as the environment on the seabed where the ship was discovered

The old ship is kept in a giant aquarium (photo), the environment inside is set to mimic the exact water temperature and quality as the environment on the seabed where the ship was discovered

Not only have the Nanhai I and its contents been preserved at the Maritime Silk Road Museum, but visitors to the complex have been able to observe the excavations of the elevated ship in real time while they are being performed (pictured)

Not only have the Nanhai I and its contents been preserved at the Maritime Silk Road Museum, but visitors to the complex have been able to observe the excavations of the elevated ship in real time while they are being performed (pictured)

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Not only have the Nanhai I and its contents been preserved at the Maritime Silk Road Museum, but visitors to the complex have been able to observe the excavations of the elevated ship in real time while they are being performed (pictured)

The Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong (photo) is the usual home of the remains of Nanhai I

The Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong (photo) is the usual home of the remains of Nanhai I

The Guangdong Maritime Silk Road Museum on Hailing Island, Guangdong (photo) is the usual home of the remains of Nanhai I

It is estimated that the wreck contained 100 tonnes of ironwork alone, accounting for half its weight capacity – including nails, pots and pans – and 13,000 porcelain from the famous Fujian, Jiangxi and Zhejiang furnaces, some of which were packaged and even labeled with the names of the stores in which they were sold and the places from which they originated.

Discoveries such as these help archaeologists to understand the important economic players active during the Song Dynasty.

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Silver and copper relics accompany the gold objects recovered from the wreck so far – including more than 17,000 copper coins – with more personal belongings such as bracelets, delicate lacquer and rings that suggest that the ship had a number of people on board when it went down . The bones of three people have been found.

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I - which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; - was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, in the province of Guangdong, in August 1987

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I - which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; - was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, in the province of Guangdong, in August 1987

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I – which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; – was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, in the province of Guangdong, in August 1987

The remains of the ship are one of the largest and oldest shipwrecks in China, dating from the time of the Song Dynasty that lasted from 960 to 1227 AD.

The remains of the ship are one of the largest and oldest shipwrecks in China, dating from the time of the Song Dynasty that lasted from 960 to 1227 AD.

The remains of the ship are one of the largest and oldest shipwrecks in China, dating from the time of the Song Dynasty that lasted from 960 to 1227 AD.

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The presence of a seat belt in the Middle East suggests that these traders and passengers probably also included foreign travelers.

& # 39; What we found was totally beyond our expectations, & # 39; Bo said.

By the time the Nanhai was supposed to have sailed, China's foreign trade had reached new peaks of prosperity.

Starting on the south coast of the country, ships such as the Nanhai, I would have embarked on such remote destinations as Southeast Asia, India and the Arab world with cargo like porcelain, silk and tea.

One of the busiest trade routes in the world was the so-called Maritime Silk Route, which ran along the southern coast of Guangdong province and which would have seen thousands of merchant ships pass by every year.

The exceptionally well-preserved old ship was a merchant ship in the sea with a large hull capacity, about 72 feet (22 meters) long and about 30 feet (9 meters) wide

The exceptionally well-preserved old ship was a merchant ship in the sea with a large hull capacity, about 72 feet (22 meters) long and about 30 feet (9 meters) wide

The exceptionally well-preserved old ship was a merchant ship in the sea with a large hull capacity, about 72 feet (22 meters) long and about 30 feet (9 meters) wide

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In addition to the necklaces, the new exhibition also includes more than 400 other relics, both recovered from the shipwreck to date, and other items from the Southern Song Dynasty.

These artifacts include ceramics, inscribed tablets, metalware, precious stones, silver jewelry and both animals and plants.

It is hoped that this presentation of the remains of Nanhai I – along with other displays elsewhere – will raise the profile of the historical value of the wreck.

The exhibition will be on display at the Guangdong Museum until 25 August 2019.

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I - which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; - was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, in the province of Guangdong, in August 1987

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I - which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; - was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, in the province of Guangdong, in August 1987

The shipwreck of the Nanhai I – which translates as & # 39; South China Sea 1 & # 39; – was first discovered by a Sino-British diving team in the South China Sea off the coast of Shangchuan Island, in the province of Guangdong, in August 1987

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