Home Australia Bay Central shoppers in Sutherland Shire point out glaring design fail with location of trolley bay at new shopping centre

Bay Central shoppers in Sutherland Shire point out glaring design fail with location of trolley bay at new shopping centre

by Elijah
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A photo shared on social media shows a row of ALDI self-service trolleys chained to an assigned stall, but the queue is so long that it overflows and blocks half the road inside the car park.

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Shoppers have pointed out a glaring design flaw in the car park of a newly opened shopping centre.

Sutherland Shire residents who have visited Bay Central, in Sydney’s south, in recent weeks have been frustrated by the poor location of the tram.

A photo shared on social media shows a row of ALDI self-service carts chained to an assigned stall; However, the line is so long that it overflows and blocks half of the street.

A resident posted the photo on Facebook and complained about those responsible.

‘As a species, there really is no future for us. These are returned Aldi carts blocking the road. Apparently more time on the weekends,” he said.

A photo shared on social media shows a row of ALDI self-service trolleys chained to an assigned stall, but the queue is so long that it overflows and blocks half the road inside the car park.

A photo shared on social media shows a row of ALDI self-service trolleys chained to an assigned stall, but the queue is so long that it overflows and blocks half the road inside the car park.

While the comment seemed to blame shoppers for continuing to add carts to the already overly long queue “just to get their dollar back,” a debate quickly broke out over who was really to blame, with many suggesting it wasn’t the shoppers.

“Stupid, just stupid,” one person agreed.

Others, however, argued that the fault lies with the parking lot design and not with the shoppers, who are simply doing what is expected of them by returning their strollers.

“I’m not sure who came up with this,” one person said of the design.

“The good thing is that there have been many lovely and thoughtful people who have returned their trolleys to the correct area,” wrote another.

Others thought the fault lies with Aldi staff, who work to remove the trolleys and return them to the supermarket.

“What surprises me is how many people in the comments are shaming buyers who do this when it’s clearly a design flaw in the car,” one said.

“It’s Aldi’s fault for not returning their carts often enough,” another commented.

‘This image perfectly draws attention to the problem that it is Aldi’s responsibility to solve. I hope they shared it with his store manager and posted it here,” a third person said.

A spokesperson for the shopping center told Yahoo News Australia that Aldi, Dan Murphy’s and Woolworths “are all responsible for managing their own trolleys”.

A spokesperson for the shopping center told Yahoo News Australia that Aldi, Dan Murphy’s and Woolworths “are all responsible for managing their own trolleys”.

“This includes collecting them from the parking lots for return to the store,” they said.

Aldi has five separate trolley spaces on the ground floor of the car park, each holding between 10 and 20 properly stored trolleys.

“We have brought this to the attention of our major retailers and raised the need to perhaps increase their collection operations,” the spokesperson said.

“We also encourage customers to look for another bay nearby in case the nearest one is full.”

Cart bays are typically up to 6 meters long and are designed to industry standard specifications.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted ALDI for comment.

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