Barack Obama urges college students to send text messages and call their parents

Speech: Barack Obama, 57, spoke Friday at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign on Friday, where he received an award for his ethics in government.

Barack Obama continues with a broken heart for his daughter, Malia, who left home to go to college.

The 57-year-old former president spoke Friday at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where he received an award for his ethics in government, and in the midst of a vicious attack on Trump and the Republicans, took the opportunity. to make some intimate comments about his role as a father.

Based on his own experience as the father of a university student, referring to Malia, his 20-year-old daughter, Obama made it very clear how much he misses having his eldest daughter, while urging the crowd of students to withdraw their phones . from time to time to chat with their parents & # 39; they cry … suffering & # 39; or send them a message.

Speech: Barack Obama, 57, spoke Friday at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign on Friday, where he received an award for his ethics in government.

Speech: Barack Obama, 57, spoke Friday at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign on Friday, where he received an award for his ethics in government.

Milestone: Barack and Michelle Obama seemed excited when they left Malia in her first year at Harvard University last year

Milestone: Barack and Michelle Obama seemed excited when they left Malia in her first year at Harvard University last year

Milestone: Barack and Michelle Obama seemed excited when they left Malia in her first year at Harvard University last year

"Now that I have a daughter in college, I can tell all the students here: your parents are suffering," she said.

& # 39; They cry in private. It's brutal. Then please call. Send a text message. & # 39;

His comments provoked laughter and applause from the crowd. Obama continued: "We need to hear from you. Just a little something.

Malia is currently beginning her second year at Harvard University, while Barack and Michelle have stayed in Washington, D.C. As his youngest daughter, Sasha, 17, ends high school.

Both Barack and Michelle Obama seemed excited when they left Malia in her first year at Harvard last year.

The parents put on their sunglasses when they left their bedroom and kept their faces down as they left quickly in their truck.

Obama had previously acknowledged that he cried during Malia's high school graduation, and that he was wearing dark sunglasses at that time.

During her first year of college, Malia has been seen several times with her boyfriend Rory Farquharson, a British student who also goes to Harvard.

Studios: Malia (photographed last year the day after she moved to her dorm) is now beginning her second year at Harvard

Studios: Malia (photographed last year the day after she moved to her dorm) is now beginning her second year at Harvard

Studios: Malia (photographed last year the day after she moved to her dorm) is now beginning her second year at Harvard

They were seen in July walking hand in hand in the London suburb of Mayfair, going out to dinner.

In his speech on Friday, Obama also shared more serious comments with the students present, urging them not only to vote in the midterm elections, but also to lead the fight against President Donald Trump and his allies.

Direction: Obama smiled as he prepared to speak with students on Friday

Direction: Obama smiled as he prepared to speak with students on Friday

Direction: Obama smiled as he prepared to speak with students on Friday

He told them that "you can not sit and wait for a savior," and that the greatest threat to democracy is not Trump but "indifference."

The speech was a foretaste of the arguments Obama is expected to make when he starts campaigning for Democrats at the polls this fall. He said that people have asked him what he is going to do for the November elections. Obama told the students: "The question is: & # 39; What are you going to do? & # 39; & # 39;

"If you thought that elections do not matter, I hope that these last two years have corrected that impression," he added.

Obama called Trump "a symptom, not a cause" of what divides the country.

He said Trump is taking advantage of the same resentments, fear and anger that politicians have fueled for years, what he sees as the result of a rapidly changing world and growing inequality.

Family: Now that I have a daughter in college, I can tell all the students here: your parents are suffering, Obama said Friday. He is photographed with Malia in 2016

Family: Now that I have a daughter in college, I can tell all the students here: your parents are suffering, Obama said Friday. He is photographed with Malia in 2016

Family: Now that I have a daughter in college, I can tell all the students here: your parents are suffering, Obama said Friday. He is photographed with Malia in 2016

Away: Malia (pictured last year in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is hundreds of miles away from her parents, who have stayed in Washington, D.C.

Away: Malia (pictured last year in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is hundreds of miles away from her parents, who have stayed in Washington, D.C.

Away: Malia (pictured last year in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is hundreds of miles away from her parents, who have stayed in Washington, D.C.

The politicians who appeal to that fear are using "an old playbook", according to Obama.

The former president said the United States should restore "honesty and decency" in the government.

"It should not be a partisan issue to say that we are not pressuring the attorney general or the FBI to use the criminal justice system as a club to punish our political opponents, or to explicitly ask the attorney general to protect members of our party. of persecution because an election is coming, "he told the crowd.

He commented: & # 39; I'm not inventing that. That is not hypothetical. "

Trump criticized the attorney general this week for prosecuting two Republican congressmen, saying it will hurt the party in the November elections.

In his speech, Obama also said that Americans and politicians of both parties should oppose discrimination and stand up clearly and unequivocally to Nazi sympathizers.

& # 39; How hard can that be? & # 39; he added. & # 39; Say that the Nazis are bad? & # 39;

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