Bankstown mayor claims Berejiklian creates ‘two classes of people’ with Sydney pandemic response

Furious mayor says Gladys Berejiklian is creating ‘two classes of people’ with her pandemic response as city is divided by ‘zip code privilege’ – revealing his passport vaccine problem

  • Mayor claims Gladys Berejiklian creates ‘two classes’ of people with response
  • Canterbury-Bankstown Mayor Khal Asfour said there is a double standard
  • Bondi’s sunbathers can go to the beach while its residents watch closely
  • Referred to a case in his area where funeral mourners were arrested in his area
  • “People are arrested when they mourn. The other may sunbathe,’ he said










Gladys Berejiklian is creating ‘two classes of people’ by imposing stricter lockdown restrictions in some parts of Sydney than others, claimed a mayor living under the stricter rules.

Canterbury-Bankstown Mayor Khal Asfour said the NSW Prime Minister’s approach showed double standards when his voters are so heavily scrutinized while residents of beachside suburbs like Bondi are allowed to sunbathe freely.

Its LGA is one of the 12 government areas where Covid-19 is spreading the fastest and residents face tighter restrictions around travel and public gatherings.

He referred to a case in which mourners were arrested at funerals in his area for exceeding the 10-person limit.

“People are arrested when they mourn. The other can sunbathe. It makes no sense,” he told ABC’s Q+A.

A group in Centennial Park on Sept. 14. Residents outside Sydney’s 12 worrying LGAs live under lighter lockdown restrictions

Mr Asfour also said he feared Ms Berejiklian’s planned vaccine passport system – which will deny unvaccinated residents access to bars, restaurants and cafes – would make it more difficult for small businesses in his area to operate.

“We will have two classes of people… my concern is how my small business owners will be able to control who can walk into their stores,” he said.

“How are they going to check that?”

He said Ms Berejklian had told him that companies should ‘call the police’ to enforce vaccine orders, but argued that approach was not good enough.

“We need more than that. They need some protection to make sure they can deal with [vaccine passports]. They don’t want their businesses to suffer more than they need to,” he said.

Pubs and restaurants will open their doors on October 4 to test the NSW government’s vaccine passport app.

Canterbury-Bankstown Mayor Khal Asfour said the NSW Prime Minister's approach showed double standards when his voters are so heavily scrutinized while residents of beachside suburbs like Bondi are allowed to sunbathe freely

Canterbury-Bankstown Mayor Khal Asfour said the NSW Prime Minister’s approach showed double standards when his voters are so heavily scrutinized while residents of beachside suburbs like Bondi are allowed to sunbathe freely

Mr Asfour also said he feared Ms Berejiklian's planned vaccine passport system would make it more difficult for small businesses in his area to operate.  Pictured are residents on Sydney's Pitt Street in the CBD

Mr Asfour also said he feared Ms Berejiklian’s planned vaccine passport system would make it more difficult for small businesses in his area to operate. Pictured are residents on Sydney’s Pitt Street in the CBD

The state is set to come out of its grueling lockdown by mid-October, when vaccination rates reach 70 percent.  Pictured: Patrons at Sydney's Opera Bar

The state is set to come out of its grueling lockdown by mid-October, when vaccination rates reach 70 percent. Pictured: Patrons at Sydney’s Opera Bar

Vaccine passports will become active in mid-October when vaccination rates reach 70 percent, Ms Berejiklian said.

Lawyer and human rights lawyer Mariam Veiszadeh said the various restrictions amounted to a ‘zip code privilege’, while Shadow Minister for Families and Social Services Linda Burney said Sydney had become a tale of two cities.

“And what I’m hearing from people — and I’ve had a lot of interaction with individuals, including Khal over the past week or so — there’s an absolute two-city feel,” Ms Burney said.

‘One where you see people going to the beach. And another where you let helicopters with loudspeakers fly over you. And that’s the reality.’

Advertisement

.