Ban on extremely vulnerable fans in the Carabao Cup final is ‘direct discrimination against disabled people’

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A fan club with a disability from Spurs has made the decision to exclude clinically extremely vulnerable fans from the Carabao Cup final, saying it is ‘direct discrimination’ to ban those supporters from attending the showpiece.

Last week, it was confirmed that the Wembley final will act as an official pilot event with fans in attendance as part of the UK government’s roadmap not to lock up.

Tottenham and Manchester City have each been allocated 2,000 tickets for the game on April 25, but as the latest ticket details emerged on Tuesday, the rules did not declare children under 18, pregnant women, clinically extremely vulnerable people or people living with anyone who is clinically extreme. vulnerable may be present.

A disabled fan group from Spurs has decided to ban clinically extremely vulnerable fans from next week’s Carabao Cup final

Vulnerable people, under the age of 18 and pregnant women are not allowed to attend the final

Vulnerable people, under the age of 18 and pregnant women are not allowed to attend the final

THE RULES TO FOLLOW THE 4,000 MAN CITY AND SPURS FANS

  • All attendees must be over 18 and not be clinically extremely frail, living with someone who is clinically extremely frail or pregnant.
  • You must complete an ERP government consent form
  • Supporters must provide evidence of a negative lateral flow Covid test within 24 hours of the match.
  • Fans will have to leave for a PCR Covid-19 test to take home as close to the match as possible, and take another test within five days of the match.
  • Proof of a negative result on that side stream test would be required to access Wembley and also to access any of the public transport options provided for traveling from the North West to London.
  • The city markets 750 standard and first-class train tickets, 750 bus spaces and 250 parking spaces for cars.

Spurs follow the guidelines of the government’s event research program, which provides advice and guidance for events like these.

However, SpursAbility, Tottenham’s disabled supporters’ club, said in a statement that it was’ extremely disappointed ‘with the decision to ban clinically extremely vulnerable fans from attending the final.

“A number of our members and supporters will fall under recent Covid-19 guidelines in this classification and have also endured long foreclosure periods,” the statement said.

However, most of them have had their first and second vaccinations and are at significantly lower risk than those who have yet to be vaccinated.

Government guidelines place people over 70 in an equal or higher risk category, but there is no exclusion problem for anyone in these higher risk groups.

The policy adopted for this competition is a direct discrimination against many disabled supporters, including those with directional access requirements with no scientific evidence to support this approach, and there is no longer a requirement from the government to decline. screens.

“ Returning to live matches is the lifeline many disabled supporters need to maintain their sanity after long periods of forced isolation, but they are being disfellowshipped based on outdated advice and a broad approach that is open to abuse in so many ways. ”

The fixture – used as a pilot event to measure the logistics of large crowds returning – will be attended by 8,000 supporters, and the 4,000 not assigned to either club will be offered to NHS staff and residents of nearby Brent.

Supporters wishing to attend the match must be able to demonstrate that they have a negative coronavirus test within 24 hours of kick-off.

To do this, fans will have to travel of their own accord to a lateral flow testing location.

Fans will then have to leave for a PCR Covid-19 test to take home as close to the match as possible, and take another test within five days of the match.

Evidence of a negative result – either via text message or email – from that lateral flow test would be required to access Wembley.

It also gives access to one of the public transport options that Manchester City offers for travel to London from the North West.

City confirmed that 1,750 of their tickets would be made available to eligible supporters in and around Greater Manchester, with the remaining 250 for qualifying fans in London and the Home Counties.

SpursAbility says the decision is

SpursAbility says the decision is “direct discrimination against clinically vulnerable fans.”

Fans who wish to attend must be able to provide proof of having a negative coronavirus test

Fans who wish to attend must be able to provide proof of having a negative coronavirus test

For the 1,750 traveling down there would be 750 standard and first class train tickets, 750 bus spaces and 250 parking spaces.

The trains and coaches will be chartered exclusively for the use of Manchester City supporters, the club said.

Tickets for both sets of supporters cost £ 50 and £ 40.

The competition will be the first outdoor sports event this year with supporters of the teams involved.

The FA Cup semi-final between Leicester and Southampton will welcome 4,000 spectators, but this will be a mix of local residents and key workers from the Wembley area.

It is expected that a similar testing system will be implemented for that competition as well.

Fans under the age of 18 and those who are 'clinically vulnerable' will not be admitted to Wembley

Fans under the age of 18 and those who are ‘clinically vulnerable’ will not be admitted to Wembley

The success of these pilot events – plus others, including the World Snooker Championship, the FA Cup final and the England group matches at Euro 2020 – will be important steps towards admitting supporters in financially viable numbers from June 21.

Last week, a group of 10 governing bodies supported the use of a Covid certification system as a means of removing restrictions on social distance.

Such a system has been challenged by cross-party MPs as an infringement of an individual’s civil liberties.

However, Premier League director Bill Bush said last week, ‘The alternative (to certification) is not freedom.

‘The alternative is social distance, small crowds, great restrictions on movement and people’s ability to eat, drink and travel. For example, away fans banned.

So in order to end those freedom restrictions, we believe that something like that is an acceptable burden to give fans the freedom to be present. ‘

Full statement from SpursAbility

“A number of our members and supporters will fall under recent Covid-19 guidelines in this classification and have also endured long foreclosure periods,” the statement said.

However, most of them have had their first and second vaccinations and are at significantly lower risk than those who have yet to be vaccinated.

Government guidelines place people over 70 in an equal or higher risk category, but there is no exclusion problem for anyone in these higher risk groups.

The policy adopted for this competition is a direct discrimination against many disabled supporters, including those with directional entry requirements with no scientific evidence to support this approach and there is no longer a requirement from the government to foreclose . ‘

The statement continued: ‘Some of our supporters have been protecting themselves for over 12 months and see this match as an opportunity to return to some form of normal lifestyle.

The competition only allows 8,000 spectators to enter an open-air stadium with a capacity of 90,000 – less than nine percent of its potential. Still, there is a choice to exclude a small group of supporters who would have to disclose their classification on a voluntary basis.

At the moment, a CEV person who has had the coronavirus and has recovered and subsequently received two vaccination doses is significantly less at risk and excluded, compared to a 40-year-old who may have unknown health conditions – who has not received any vaccinations. and is therefore a greater risk and is welcomed with open arms. Is this fair and reasonable?

“ We request that these criteria in the government-led research program for reopening live events to the general public be revised in terms of actual research to date and the reality of the priorities in the government-defined vaccination program.

Returning to live matches is the lifeline many disabled supporters need to maintain their mental health after long periods of forced isolation, but they are being disfellowshipped based on outdated advice and a broad approach that is open to abuse in so many ways.

“Football has many fan-led associations that are all willing to contribute to these causes – why didn’t we get this opportunity?”