Balmain abandons models in favor of CGI creations for new campaign

Futurist: Balmain is the latest designer to turn fashion into the future with the presentation of his own CGI models

Balmain has abandoned the Kardashians in favor of computer-generated image (CGI) models to use the latest creations of the designer brand.

The brand, led by designer Olivier Rousteing, 32, presented three virtual women, Margot, Shudu and Zhi, who will join the & # 39; Balmain's Army & # 39; for his latest autumn clothing campaign.

In the past, bold designs inspired by rock stars have been used by a large number of celebrities such as Kendall Jenner, Kim Kardashian and Gigi Hadid. But Balmain decided to follow in the footsteps of his competitors who look to the future of fashion.

Futurist: Balmain is the latest designer to turn fashion into the future with the presentation of his own CGI models

Futurist: Balmain is the latest designer to turn fashion into the future with the presentation of his own CGI models

Virtual: the three new CGI models will join the & # 39; Balmain Army & # 39; in his last campaign

Virtual: the three new CGI models will join the & # 39; Balmain Army & # 39; in his last campaign

Virtual: the three new CGI models will join the & # 39; Balmain Army & # 39; in his last campaign

"The new virtual troops reflect the same beautiful diverse mix, strong confidence and enthusiasm to explore new worlds," Balmain said in a Twitter post after announcing the three new faces.

Go ahead? In the past, Balmain designer Olivier Rousteing turned to high-profile stars like the Kardashians to model their clothing

Go ahead? In the past, Balmain designer Olivier Rousteing turned to high-profile stars like the Kardashians to model their clothing

Go ahead? In the past, Balmain designer Olivier Rousteing turned to high-profile stars like the Kardashians to model their clothing

Included in the campaign is the controversial creation of CGI Shudu, a dark beauty model of Fenty that people previously said took away jobs from people of color in the industry.

Shudu was created by Cameron-James Wilson, 28, British photographer.

After the violent reaction, Cameron-James affirmed that all his intention of the model CGI was to promote the diversity and the empoderamiento of all the races.

"Basically Shudu is my creation, she's my piece of art that I'm working on right now," Cameron-James told Harper & # 39; s Bazaar at the time.

"Unfortunately it's not a real model, but it represents many of today's real models."

Despite the controversy, Balmain still recruited Cameron-Jam and his model for his virtual campaign to promote diversity and inclusion.

The other two models, Margot and Zhi, were created by Balmain exclusively for the new campaign of the virtual army.

In an interview with Refinery29, Olivier said that Zhi is a Chinese beauty and was reflected behind David Bowie and his short hair.

Controversial: one of the CGI models, Shudu, was created by Cameron-James Wilson. People said that they were trying to eliminate jobs for people of color with the virtual model

Controversial: one of the CGI models, Shudu, was created by Cameron-James Wilson. People said that they were trying to eliminate jobs for people of color with the virtual model

Controversial: one of the CGI models, Shudu, was created by Cameron-James Wilson. People said that they were trying to eliminate jobs for people of color with the virtual model

Realistic: Margot was Olivier's "French model of inspiration" and was created exclusively by Balmain

Realistic: Margot was Olivier's "French model of inspiration" and was created exclusively by Balmain

Realistic: Margot was Olivier's "French model of inspiration" and was created exclusively by Balmain

Realistic: The third model, called Zhi, is a Chinese beauty inspired by David Bowie

Realistic: The third model, called Zhi, is a Chinese beauty inspired by David Bowie

Realistic: The third model, called Zhi, is a Chinese beauty inspired by David Bowie

"She's the one pushing the agenda that David Bowie did in the past," Olivier said.

Margot, on the other hand, is described as Olivier's "French girl of her dreams".

The virtual army was inspired by Olivier's love of music, specifically the greats like Michael Jackson, David Bowie and Tina Turner. All of them helped to alter the music industry in their own way.

Michael Jackson, especially, was a big influence for Olivier in the way he wanted to represent the brand and promote inclusion.

"That's what I'm trying to do with the army of virtual reality: different beauties, forms, ages and genres," Olivier said.

& # 39; This is the beginning of what it will mean to present diversity in the world & # 39;

There has not been an official announcement, but more virtual models that include men could be presented later this year to add to the army.

Kendall Jenner

Kendall Jenner

Kylie Jenner

Kylie Jenner

Fans: previously, Balmain has been modeled by Kendall Jenner (left) and Kylie Jenner (right)

Famous faces: CGI stars have been a hot topic in recent months, including Lil Miquela (pictured) who has "modeled" famous brands such as Alison Lou (left) and Alexander Wang.

Although Balmain is perhaps the most important brand to use a full cast of CGI models for a campaign, this is certainly not the first time that a computer-generated star has made its mark on the fashion industry.

Earlier this year, a model by the name of Miquela Sousa, who is Lil 'Miquela on Instagram, made headlines around the world when it was revealed that it was actually a computer generated creation.

Before the surprising revelation about her true origins, freckled beauty had unleashed a serious intrigue in line with her perfect publications and her unique looks, but few had thought to suggest that she might be too good to be honest.

On the surface, the CGI model seemed to be the ideal fashion influencer, showing off some of the world's biggest brands on its Instagram account, from funky jewelry brand Alison Lou to King Alexander Wang.

Then there's Shudu Gram, another famous online face that was revealed to be the work of British photographer Cameron-James Wilson, who had already made waves in the industry when her image was republished by Rihanna's Fenty Beauty brand.

Like Miquela, the perfect aspect of Shudu provoked dozens of questions from his followers, and one fan even remarked that the model was "too perfect to be real".

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