WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Bali resorts offer tourist deals with one family LIVING in a luxury hotel for $ 240 per month

Bali resorts offer tourists dirt cheap accommodation as the corona virus shakes the local economy and leaves the streets, with a family paying $ 240 per month to stay in a luxury villa.

Ukrainian woman Anastasia Strelevske and her mother Larysa arrived in Bali in January and are among the few tourists remaining on the island after COVID-19 has spread around the world.

The pair only pay $ 240 a month to live in a brand new beachfront hotel in Kuta and plan to stay for the rest of the lockdown.

Ukrainian woman Anastasia Strelevske (left) and her mother Larysa (right) arrived in Bali in January and are the few remaining tourists

Ukrainian woman Anastasia Strelevske (left) and her mother Larysa (right) arrived in Bali in January and are the few remaining tourists

The mother and daughter (pictured) are currently only paying $ 240 a month to stay in a brand new beachfront luxury hotel in Kuta and plan to stay for the rest of the closure

The mother and daughter (pictured) are currently only paying $ 240 a month to stay in a brand new beachfront luxury hotel in Kuta and plan to stay for the rest of the closure

The mother and daughter (pictured) are currently only paying $ 240 a month to stay in a brand new beachfront luxury hotel in Kuta and plan to stay for the rest of the closure

“It’s good to stay here, I don’t want to go back to my country. Here’s good, ”she told The Sydney Morning Herald.

Businesses in the tourist center are working according to strict hours or closed, but Ms Strelevske said that life had not completely stopped.

She regularly does yoga classes with 50 other people and walks along the beach with her mother.

Ms Strelevske said she does not want to return to her home country after the closure. Shown: Stock image of a luxury hotel in Kuta, Bali

Ms Strelevske said she does not want to return to her home country after the closure. Shown: Stock image of a luxury hotel in Kuta, Bali

Ms Strelevske said she does not want to return to her home country after the closure. Shown: Stock image of a luxury hotel in Kuta, Bali

Ms Strelevske said she is happy to be locked up on the island, but that she must keep her social distance to avoid the virus.

“If I keep my distance, stay healthy, keep my immune system [system strong]Even if I’m sick I’ll get well, “she said.

It comes after Bali’s locals hit western tourists who were caught ignoring social distance rules for swimming and eating in restaurants.

Kuta Beach has been closed to tourists since the COVID-19 pandemic. Shown on March 31

Kuta Beach has been closed to tourists since the COVID-19 pandemic. Shown on March 31

Kuta Beach has been closed to tourists since the COVID-19 pandemic. Shown on March 31

Tourists were filmed soaking up the sun in Canggu, a holiday resort on the south coast of the Indonesian island.

Shots taken at the PNB Beach Resort show groups of western tourists filling in restaurants and swimming in the pool.

A guest at the hotel filmed the videos and told Daily Mail Australia that people are blatantly ignoring all the rules in Canggu.

Shots taken at the PNB Beach Resort show groups of western tourists filling in restaurants (photo) and sitting close together

Shots taken at the PNB Beach Resort show groups of western tourists filling in restaurants (photo) and sitting close together

Shots taken at the PNB Beach Resort show groups of western tourists filling in restaurants (photo) and sitting close together

Western tourists have been filmed surfing in Canggu, a holiday resort on the south coast of the Indonesian island, completely ignoring social distance

Western tourists have been filmed surfing in Canggu, a holiday resort on the south coast of the Indonesian island, completely ignoring social distance

Western tourists have been filmed surfing in Canggu, a holiday resort on the south coast of the Indonesian island, completely ignoring social distance

This is despite reports that as many as 2,200 people in Indonesia have died from COVID-19, well above the official state figure of 765.

It has one of the lowest test rates in the world, with experts fearing the situation is far worse than officials reveal.

“There are a lot of people in the hotel restaurant and pool where I am staying despite only three rooms being occupied,” said the hotel guest.

“They all pretend it’s all a farce.”

Other parts of Bali are completely deserted because the coronavirus pandemic prevented tourists from going on vacation.

Shots of streets in Seminyak uploaded by Bali Inside Guide on April 22 show closed shops and hardly any traffic on the roads.

Western tourists, including some Australians, are depicted in groups at the pool of the PNB Beach Resort, ignoring the social distance laws (shown) to enjoy some time in the sun

Western tourists, including some Australians, are depicted in groups at the pool of the PNB Beach Resort, ignoring the social distance laws (shown) to enjoy some time in the sun

Western tourists, including some Australians, are depicted in groups at the pool of the PNB Beach Resort, ignoring the social distance laws (shown) to enjoy some time in the sun

A guest at the hotel filmed the videos and told Daily Mail Australia that people are blatantly ignoring all the rules in Canggu (photo) and socializing nearby

A guest at the hotel filmed the videos and told Daily Mail Australia that people are blatantly ignoring all the rules in Canggu (photo) and socializing nearby

A guest at the hotel filmed the videos and told Daily Mail Australia that people are blatantly ignoring all the rules in Canggu (photo) and socializing nearby

Flights to Indonesia were suspended on April 2 because countries around the world closed their borders in an attempt to curb the number of COVID-19 infections.

Many were devastated to see the once-vibrant tourist mecca empty, but others said it looked “peaceful” now that people on vacation were gone.

CAN I GO TO BALI?

Indonesia has banned all tourist and transit travel until further notice.

This means no tourists are allowed to visit – not even to the island of Bali.

Anyone arriving from abroad with an existing resident visa must complete a 14-day quarantine.

For those already there, there is very limited availability of test and infection control facilities.

Critical care, including in Bali, is well below the standards available in Australia.

Medical evacuation for COVID-19 patients is not allowed.

There is a serious lack of intensive care and fans.

Source: SmartTraveller

Tourism companies in Bali were hit hardest by the travel restrictions, with more than 46,000 workers made redundant.

Frightening photos of Ngurah Rai International Airport appeared on March 12 of the once-crowded International Airport almost devoid of people.

The photos were posted on social media by a local guide accompanied by the caption: ‘Bali Airport today at 9:30 am. Very empty. Bali very sad and hard life. ‘

On April 14, Australians were warned that they may be blocked from going abroad until at least January, with the ban on international travel likely to continue until next year.

Holidaymakers should not book international travel during the Corona virus crisis, Federal Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham warned.

“I wouldn’t give any guarantees that you could go on that overseas trip in December,” he told ABC’s News Breakfast.

“This is a time when people unfortunately cannot take a holiday and cannot go abroad in the near future.”

A video was uploaded by Bali Inside Guide on April 22 (photo) showing many empty streets, shops closed and hardly any traffic on the roads

A video was uploaded by Bali Inside Guide on April 22 (photo) showing many empty streets, shops closed and hardly any traffic on the roads

A video was uploaded by Bali Inside Guide on April 22 (photo) showing many empty streets, shops closed and hardly any traffic on the roads

Bali workers are suffering financial losses from the economic downturn of the corona virus since last month - before flight restrictions were introduced (photo: an empty Ngurah Rai International Airport)

Bali workers are suffering financial losses from the economic downturn of the corona virus since last month - before flight restrictions were introduced (photo: an empty Ngurah Rai International Airport)

Bali workers are suffering financial losses from the economic downturn of the coronavirus since last month – before flight restrictions were introduced (photo: an empty Ngurah Rai International Airport)

.

Comments
Loading...