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Bali changes as the corona virus savages tourism and hides the Aussie crimes

Vacations to the idyllic island of Bali may never be the same after the coronavirus pandemic, with closed shops, bars and restaurants never opening their doors again.

But Bali officials have linked the drop in crime rates to a plunge into Australian tourists – with a bizarre series of new sentences.

Kuta, police chief detective, Bagus Nagara Baranacita, told the story Courier post the local station cells used to be filled with brash, drunken tourists.

“We were always busy with Australians fighting, drunk Australians and Aussies arrested with drugs,” he said.

About 20,000 Australians visited the Indonesian island at any time during the pre-COVID 19 times.

A man is forced to do push-ups as officers introduce new penalties for police coronavirus limitations (pictured in May)

A man is forced to do push-ups as officers introduce new penalties for police coronavirus limitations (pictured in May)

Police officers say crime rates have declined, along with the number of unruly Australian tourists who have visited the country (see photo, police check documents in Denpasar on May 15))

Police officers say crime rates have declined, along with the number of unruly Australian tourists who have visited the country (see photo, police check documents in Denpasar on 15 May))

Police officers say crime rates have declined, along with the number of unruly Australian tourists who have visited the country (see photo, police check documents in Denpasar on May 15))

But months after the coronavirus pandemic and the number of foreign tourists arrival in Indonesia plunged by 60 percent in March.

On April 1, only four international flights landed in Bali, down 95 percent from the same time last year, with Australians not allowed to travel abroad.

Bali has only had 343 reported COVID-19 infections and only four deaths.

The number of visitors is decreasing, companies have closed their shops, beaches have been emptied and the country is closed.

An advantage to locals is that the virus has driven out unruly tourists and relieves overworked and frustrated police.

Mr Baranacita’s bragging crime is nowhere what it was with the decline in tourism.

“Please come to my office and see the empty cells. There are no Australians! ‘ he said.

One of the most recent nationally published clashes between Australians and the law includes ‘Fly Kick Nick’ Nicholas Carr in 2019.

The Adelaide man was imprisoned for four months after kicking a motorcyclist off his bicycle in Seminyak.

Brisbane Broncos NRL player David Fifita was caught fighting for a club and Matthew Coast man Matthew Richard went to prison for pocket robbery the same year.

Prison cells are now largely unoccupied, except “local purse thieves, motorcycle thieves, pickpockets and a person with counterfeit money.”

Motorcyclists caught without a mask covering their mouths were stopped on the street and ordered to do 20 push-ups by order of police officers (shown in May)

Motorcyclists caught without a mask covering their mouths were stopped on the street and ordered to do 20 push-ups by order of police officers (shown in May)

Motorcyclists caught without a mask covering their mouths were stopped on the street and ordered to do 20 push-ups by order of police officers (shown in May)

Motorcyclists caught without a mask are beaten with an unusual punishment (pictured in May)

Motorcyclists caught without a mask are beaten with an unusual punishment (pictured in May)

Motorcyclists caught without a mask are beaten with an unusual punishment (pictured in May)

North Kuta police detective Androyuan Elim added that no Australians have committed any offense since the closure.

But that can also be attributed to new police methods, as officers track people’s movements on the street.

Motorcyclists caught without a mask receive an unusual punishment and are forced to do 20 push-ups along the way.

“We keep watch on the highway and stop people who don’t wear masks and prevent people from going to the beach,” said Elim.

In Intaran, a village in Sanur, anyone caught without a face mask is fined 5 kg of rice and ordered to perform community service.

They have to remove the palms from the village for three days.

The head of the Sanglah Hospital’s forensic medicine department, Ida Bagus Putu Alit, noted that the number of emergency admissions had also decreased with the more severe restrictions.

She couldn’t remember treating an Australian who had been involved in a motorcycle accident since the coronavirus blockage.

A few local people caught without wearing face masks were instructed to do push-ups on the spot (see photo)

A few local people caught without wearing face masks were instructed to do push-ups on the spot (see photo)

A few local people caught without wearing face masks were instructed to do push-ups on the spot (see photo)

Facial masks have become mandatory in Bali because the Indonesian island controls the spread of the coronavirus (photo, a man on Serangan Island, January 26)

Face masks have become mandatory in Bali as the Indonesian island combats the spread of the coronavirus (photo, a man on Serangan Island, January 26)

Facial masks have become mandatory in Bali because the Indonesian island controls the spread of the coronavirus (photo, a man on Serangan Island, January 26)

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