Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Baby, two parents and an employee test positive for coronavirus at Melbourne Royal Children’s Hospital

A baby, two parents and a worker tested positive for the coronavirus in the neonatal ward of the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne.

Victoria’s Department of Health and Human Services said all babies, staff and parents in the department will be tested for the deadly disease.

It comes when Victoria suffers a record 532 new cases of coronavirus while Prime Minister Daniel Andrews threatens to shut down entire industries in the next phase of restrictions.

Six other Victorians died overnight, including five elderly people in aged care and a man in his fifties. A total of 245 people are hospitalized and 44 are in intensive care.

Prime Minister Andrews warned that the six-week blockade in Melbourne, which began on July 9, may need to be extended because the spread of the virus fails to stop.

A baby, two parents and a worker have been tested positive in the neonatal ward of the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne (photo)

A baby, two parents and a worker have been tested positive in the neonatal ward of the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne (photo)

He urged people not to go to work if they are ill after outbreaks have been discovered in meat factories, retirement homes, law firms and other workplaces.

“We have too many people who have complaints and are going to work. That’s what drives these numbers up, ”said Mr. Andrews.

“The block doesn’t end until people stop working with symptoms and instead test because they have symptoms.”

The prime minister said the next phase of restrictions “may include” shutting down industries where outbreaks are taking place, such as the freight, logistics and storage sectors.

“The next steps may include closing some of these industries if we continue to see people attending work,” he said.

Deputy Chief Chef Nick Coatsworth said the virus is “deeply embedded” in Melbourne. Pictured: ADF troops and police in Melbourne on Sunday

ADF personnel and Victorian police officers patrol the Botanic Gardens in Melbourne on Sunday

ADF personnel and Victorian police officers patrol the Botanic Gardens in Melbourne on Sunday

ADF personnel and Victorian police officers patrol the Botanic Gardens in Melbourne on Sunday

Residents wear masks in the Botanic Gardens in Melbourne

Residents wear masks in the Botanic Gardens in Melbourne

Residents wear masks in the Botanic Gardens in Melbourne

Medical personnel remove clinical waste at St. Basil's Home for the Aged Care in Fawkner, which had an outbreak of COVID-19

Medical personnel remove clinical waste at St. Basil's Home for the Aged Care in Fawkner, which had an outbreak of COVID-19

Medical personnel remove clinical waste at St. Basil’s Home for the Aged Care in Fawkner, which had an outbreak of COVID-19

The total number of cases exceeds Sunday’s 459, as a second wave of the deadly disease continues to devastate the state.

National Deputy Chief of Chief Nick Coatsworth said the closure should have lowered case numbers by now, but the corona virus is “deeply embedded” in Australia’s second largest city.

“The virus is deeply embedded in the Victoria community,” he told the Nine’s Today program.

But Dr. Coatsworth said there are some signs of hope, as the lockdown manages to prevent movement.

“We know that Victorians in those lockdown zones mix much less, the motion data shows we’re roughly where we were in that first wave when the curve started to flatten.

“The other bit of a silver lining is that those numbers, while very worrying, bounce between 350 and 450 a day and we certainly don’t see doubling during the week, which should be a good thing.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said today that Victoria “has a long way to go” before slashing huge daily totals.

“There is still a long way to go in Victoria. We are still seeing case numbers at elevated levels and so, as we have seen in other jurisdictions, it takes some time to fix that when you get community-based transmission.

“We saw that in the UK. We saw it in Europe. We’ve seen it in other places, ”he said.

A resident wears a mask in Melbourne when the state outbreak worsens

A resident wears a mask in Melbourne when the state outbreak worsens

A resident wears a mask in Melbourne when the state outbreak worsens

There are fears that the six-week Melbourne shutdown, which began on July 9, should be extended because the spread of the virus fails to stop. Pictured: Medical personnel remove clinical waste at St. Basil's nursing home

There are fears that the six-week Melbourne shutdown, which began on July 9, should be extended because the spread of the virus fails to stop. Pictured: Medical personnel remove clinical waste at St. Basil's nursing home

There are fears that the six-week Melbourne shutdown, which began on July 9, should be extended because the spread of the virus fails to stop. Pictured: Medical personnel remove clinical waste at St. Basil’s nursing home

On Sundays, a cyclist with a mask is worn along Melbourne's Yarra River

On Sundays, a cyclist with a mask is worn along Melbourne's Yarra River

On Sundays, a cyclist with a mask is worn along Melbourne’s Yarra River

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) said today that Victoria “has a long way to go” before the massive daily totals are lowered

Mr Morrison said Prime Minister Daniel Andrews will “seek advice” from health experts as to whether the block should be extended.

Hundreds of Victorian residents and senior care staff battle COVID-19 as families struggle to control their loved ones as the death toll is expected to rise in the country’s worst-hit state.

Mr. Morrison called on Victorians to keep state rules locked to stop the transfer of the community.

“If you’re having problems with aged care, it’s a function of community transfer,” he said.

“If you want to protect the most vulnerable in our community, that’s why it’s so important.”

Victoria’s chief health officer Brett Sutton said the second wave was “difficult and complex” to deal with.

“Certainly, these are very challenging numbers, we are in a very challenging phase with this wave,” he said.

Professor Sutton said this wave is different from the first one because most patients were younger, meaning they go to work.

“Our transmission areas take place in workplaces, usually essential workplaces,” he said.

He warned of more deaths in retirement homes with outbreaks.

There are now 84 cases linked to St Basil’s Home for The Aged in Fawkner; 77 in Epping Gardens aged care; 62 in Menarocklife elderly care in Essendon; 53 in Glendale elderly care in Werribee; 57 in Kirkbrae Presbyterian houses in Kilsyth; and 50 in Estia elderly care in Heidelberg.

New South Wales registered 17 new cases on Monday. Four of the new cases are related to the funeral cluster, three are household contacts from cases related to Thai Rock Wetherill Park, and two are being investigated. Eight are returned travelers in hotel quarantine.

.