Baby girl, 9 months old, greeted a & # 039; miracle & # 039; for the survival of a rare tumor that absorbs 60% of the brain

A baby girl in Florida is praised as a & # 39; wonder & # 39; for the survival of a rare and aggressive brain tumor.

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Katie Rose Hayes was born in September 2018, about four weeks before her due date after her mother had experienced pre-eclampsia at the end of her pregnancy – pregnancy-related high blood pressure – which required a C-section.

Everything seemed fine until Katie's grandmother felt that something was wrong with the newborn WKMG.

Her parents, Mary and Tom, took her to the Arnold Palmer Children's Hospital in Orlando, where a rare brain tumor, gliobastoma multiforma, was diagnosed, which absorbs most of her brain.

Katie should not have survived the night – but she did and now, eight months later, her tumor continues to shrink.

Katie Rose Hayes, 9 months, from Florida, was born in September 2018, four weeks before her due date after her mother had developed pre-eclampsia. Pictured: Katie in the hospital

When she was four weeks old, in October 2018, she was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer. Pictured: Katie

When she was four weeks old, in October 2018, she was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer. Pictured: Katie

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Katie Rose Hayes, 9 months (left and right), from Florida, was born in September 2018, four weeks before her due date after her mother had developed pre-eclampsia. When she was four weeks old, in October 2018, she was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer

The tumor took up 60% of her brain and her parents were told that she might not survive the night. Pictured: # 1 is her tumor when it was found in October 2018, # 2 is the next day after her brain surgery, # 3 is after two rounds of chemotherapy in December 2018 and # 4 is February 2019

The tumor took up 60% of her brain and her parents were told that she might not survive the night. Pictured: # 1 is her tumor when it was found in October 2018, # 2 is the next day after her brain surgery, # 3 is after two rounds of chemotherapy in December 2018 and # 4 is February 2019

The tumor took up 60% of her brain and her parents were told that she might not survive the night. Pictured: # 1 is her tumor when it was found in October 2018, # 2 is the next day after her brain surgery, # 3 is after two rounds of chemotherapy in December 2018 and # 4 is February 2019

Gliobastoma is a rare, aggressive type of brain tumor that is found in the brain or on the spinal cord.

It is the same type of tumor that led to the death of Senator John McCain and Beau Biden, the son of former Vice President Joe Biden.

The tumors are formed from star-shaped cells in the brain known as astrocytes and provide their own blood supply, allowing them to grow quickly.

Symptoms include constant painful headache, vomiting, seizures, double vision, and trouble talking.

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According to the American Brain Tumor Association, around 14,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.

Treatment options to slow and control tumor growth include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation – but the cancer usually comes back.

The tumors are grade IV, the most deadly form, and the five-year survival rate is only five percent.

In the case of Katie, the tumor was the size of a tennis ball and took up 60 percent of her brain, WKMG reported.

Katie (photo) survived and underwent surgery the next morning, with doctors removing more than 70 percent of her tumor

Katie (photo) survived and underwent surgery the next morning, with doctors removing more than 70 percent of her tumor

Katie (photo) immediately started chemotherapy, which she did for 10 rounds
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Katie (photo) immediately started chemotherapy, which she did for 10 rounds

Katie (left and right) survived and underwent surgery the next morning, with doctors removing more than 70 percent of her tumor. She immediately started chemotherapy, which she did for 10 rounds

In May 2019, Katie completed her final round of chemotherapy and called the & # 39; cancer-free & # 39; call at the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children. Pictured: Katie with her parents, Mary and Tom, on her last day of chemotherapy

In May 2019, Katie completed her final round of chemotherapy and called the & # 39; cancer-free & # 39; call at the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children. Pictured: Katie with her parents, Mary and Tom, on her last day of chemotherapy

In May 2019, Katie completed her final round of chemotherapy and called the & # 39; cancer-free & # 39; call at the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children. Pictured: Katie with her parents, Mary and Tom, on her last day of chemotherapy

A team of pediatric intensive care specialists said that if they survived the night, surgery would be planned for the following day.

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& # 39; I said, "Is my baby going to live?", Mary recalled one of the doctors. & # 39; And he says, "I don't know she has a lot of fluid in her brain."

Doctors were able to stabilize her and on October 26 she underwent surgery in which more than 70 percent of the tumor was removed.

Dr. Samer Elbabaa, a pediatric surgeon at Arnold Palmer Hospital who removed the tumor, told WKMG that he believes the tumor is congenital.

This means that the tumor was formed while Mary was pregnant with Katie, although it is unclear when.

& # 39; If she had gone to the full term, to 40 (weeks), she would probably have been a stillborn child, so this is a miracle in itself, & # 39; Mary said to the station.

Doctors believe the tumor is congenital, meaning it was formed while Mary was pregnant with Katie. Pictured: Katie on her last day of chemotherapy
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Doctors believe the tumor is congenital, meaning it was formed while Mary was pregnant with Katie. Pictured: Katie on her last day of chemotherapy

Doctors believe the tumor is congenital, meaning it was formed while Mary was pregnant with Katie. Pictured: Katie on her last day of chemotherapy

Katie is now taking a medication for patients who test positive for certain genes that help cancer tumors grow. Pictured: Katie with her mother, Mary, on her last day of chemotherapy

Katie is now taking a medication for patients who test positive for certain genes that help cancer tumors grow. Pictured: Katie with her mother, Mary, on her last day of chemotherapy

Katie is now taking a medication for patients who test positive for certain genes that help cancer tumors grow. Pictured: Katie with her mother, Mary, on her last day of chemotherapy

Since then, Katie has undergone 10 rounds of chemotherapy. By the end of December 2018, the tumor had reduced by half.

According to a Facebook page Kisses for Katie, on which her parents provide updates, she has already reached her developmental milestones.

On 31 May she called the & # 39; cancer-free & # 39; call to indicate that she had completed her last round of chemotherapy.

Katie is currently using a new drug called Vitrakvi, which is for patients who test positive for certain genes that help American Cancer Association.

A Facebook post states that her next MRI to see if her tumor has continued to shrink is August 28.

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