Baby eastern brown snake is found lurking in a girl's bedroom

Horror as a deadly baby Eastern brown snake is found to be perfectly camouflaged in the bedroom of a teenage girl

  • A small East-brown snake was found in the bedroom of a teenage girl in Doreen
  • It is the second deadliest snake in the world, but it is common to find it at home
  • Snake hunter Mark Pelley said he caught four baby snakes in the last two days

A deadly baby East-brown snake has been found lurking in a teenage girl's room after slipping under the bedroom door.

The little snake was found by the maid's mother who noticed it in their home in Doreen, Melbourne.

The deadly creature was hardly recognizable because the brown skin was perfectly camouflaged with the carpet.

A deadly baby East-brown snake was found lurking in the room of a teenage girl

A deadly baby East-brown snake was found lurking in the room of a teenage girl

Snake hunter Mark Pelley said eastern browns, the second deadliest snake in the world, were not unusual to find.

& # 39; The [eastern brown] is very common. Actually the most common snake I catch, & he told Daily Mail Australia.

Eastern brown snakes can be easily identified because they usually have a black spot on their head or a dark neckband.

Mr Pelley said that he had caught four baby slurettes in the last two days, despite the long season in February.

The eastern brown snake is the second deadliest snake in the world and the hunter Mark Pelley said they are not unusual to find

The eastern brown snake is the second deadliest snake in the world and the hunter Mark Pelley said they are not unusual to find

The eastern brown snake is the second deadliest snake in the world and the hunter Mark Pelley said they are not unusual to find

EASTERN BROWN SNAKE

They have a striking dark spot on the top of the head and over the neck, and some young ones also have dark bands all the way up the body.

These markers fade as they age, but in some populations the bands are held in adulthood.

The species is widespread throughout Eastern Australia, from the north of Queensland to South Australia.

They have the unfortunate distinction of causing more snake bite deaths than any other species of snake in Australia.

Many bites are a direct consequence of people trying to kill these snakes and could clearly have been avoided

Source: Queensland Museum

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