Advertisements
A baby from Queensland died of deadly meningococci (stock image)

Baby dies after diagnosis deadly meningococci – as an adult suffering from the disease recovers in the hospital

  • A baby died in Queensland after the meningococcal diagnosis
  • A West Australian adult recovers after treatment for meningococci
  • 41 cases in WA last year, 34 in QLD in 2019, but experts say there is no outbreak
Advertisements

A baby from Queensland died of deadly meningococci.

They were one of the three babies diagnosed in recent weeks, bringing the total of the state so far to 34 cases in 2019.

Public health experts do not believe that the cases are separate and do not constitute an outbreak, The courier post reported.

It comes when a West Australian adult recovers in the hospital after they have also been diagnosed with the disease.

Advertisements

The adult is being treated for the B strain.

A baby from Queensland died of deadly meningococci (stock image)

A baby from Queensland died of deadly meningococci (stock image)

Variations of the type of bacterial disease were found in all patients.

In Australia strains A, B, C, W and Y are the most common.

The national immunization program offers a combined vaccination that protects against A, C, W and Y.

A B stock vaccination is currently available for hundreds of dollars, but is awaiting funding under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee.

Advertisements

Meningococcal is a rare but serious disease that can kill within a few hours or leave survivors with severe physical disabilities.

Parents are advised to take children to the hospital if they have high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, sleepiness, confusion, sudden severe joint pain, purple rash or blemishes, hypersensitivity to bright light and vomiting.

Parents are advised to take children to the hospital if they have a high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, sleepiness, confusion, sudden severe joint pain, purple rash or blemishes, hypersensitivity to bright light and vomiting.

Parents are advised to take children to the hospital if they have a high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, sleepiness, confusion, sudden severe joint pain, purple rash or blemishes, hypersensitivity to bright light and vomiting.

Parents are advised to take children to the hospital if they have a high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, sleepiness, confusion, sudden severe joint pain, purple rash or blemishes, hypersensitivity to bright light and vomiting.

Advertisements

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news