Auto fuel prices rise to the highest level in four years for the tenth consecutive week

Unleaded and diesel prices have risen again (Lewis Whyld / PA)

Gasoline and diesel prices are again four years high and will continue to rise as Hurricane makes Florence oil more expensive

  • The average cost of a liter of lead-free stand at more than £ 1.30 on British front yards
  • Since April, the cost of filling a typical 55-liter family car has increased by £ 6
  • Hurricane Florence has already paid the world price for crude oil higher
  • That will work through even higher petrol prices

Adrian Lowery for Thisismoney.co.uk

Motorists see the highest prices at the pump in more than four years after a tenth consecutive week of fuel inflation – and could be worse if Hurricane Florence steers crude oil higher.

The average cost of a liter of lead-free stand at more than £ 1.30 on British front yards, with a diesel of more than £ 1.34, shows the government's figures. Fuel has not been more expensive than the current levels since July 2014.

And even more increases are in store, as world oil prices peaked this week in anticipation of production disruptions in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, which is on its way to the American coast around the Carolinas.

Unleaded and diesel prices have risen again (Lewis Whyld / PA)

Unleaded and diesel prices have risen again (Lewis Whyld / PA)

Brent crude, the international benchmark, rose to $ 79.46, just a month ago as low as $ 65.

Since April, the cost of filling a typical 55-liter family car running on unleaded diesel or diesel has risen by around £ 6.

And in another potential bump to car expenses, Chancellor Philip Hammond earlier this week hinted that he could cancel the eight-year freeze of fuel tax in this autumn's budget.

He told MPs the analysis of his department from 2014, which stated that the benefits of the freeze that compensates all tax losses, ought to be re-examined in the context of today's economy & # 39 ;.

The fuel load has been maintained at a speed of 58 p per liter since 2011. Mr Hammond said that this saved the average car driver £ 850 compared to the escalator before 2010.

Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation, said: "The Chancellor is right to say that drivers have benefited from a long-term freeze on battery power, but we must not forget that for many people real wages have stagnated over the last decade or even dropped.

& # 39; As it is today, transport continues – and in most cases that means driving a car – the largest area of ​​average household expenses.

& # 39; Greater government policy also affects fuel costs due to its impact on the exchange rate. The continued rise in pump prices is partly driven by the weak pound against the dollar. & # 39;

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