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Australia’s first ISIS bride is imprisoned in Turkey after fleeing the Syrian refugee camp with her children

An Australian ISIS bride who left Melbourne to fight for the terrorist organization has been held in Turkey for three years after fleeing a Syrian refugee camp with her two young children.

Zehra Duman, 26, was convicted in court this week for recruiting brides to join ISIS and spreading Islamic State propaganda on social media.

She had been in a Şanlıurfa prison on the Turkish border since July 17 after fleeing the Al-Hol camp in northeastern Syria.

Her four-year-old son Jarrad and one-year-old daughter Layla were placed in a child protection center but are now in the custody of Ms. Duman’s mother Ozlem Coskun who had traveled from Melbourne for the hearing, the Herald Sun reports.

Zehra Duman (pictured), 26, has been sentenced to three years in a Turkish prison for being a member of the Islamic state

Zehra Duman (pictured), 26, has been sentenced to three years in a Turkish prison for being a member of the Islamic state

The details of her sentence and which prison she will be in remain unclear.

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to the Ministry of the Interior and the Turkish Embassy for further comment.

Duman, then 19, became Australia’s first ISIS bride in 2014 when she fled to Syria to join the terrorist group and marry Mahmoud Abullatif, a former Muslim extremist from Melbourne who died just five weeks after their wedding. was killed in an air raid.

She became a major ISIS social media recruiter, posing with machine guns and on the hoods of luxury cars stolen by the terrorists, urging other Westerners to leave civilization and join the Islamic regime.

She remarried and had a son with her second husband, followed by a daughter with a third. Both men are now dead too.

Zehra Duman (right) pictured as a teenager with her mother Ozlem Coskun in Melbourne before fleeing to Syria

Zehra Duman (right) pictured as a teenager with her mother Ozlem Coskun in Melbourne before fleeing to Syria

Zehra Duman (right) pictured as a teenager with her mother Ozlem Coskun in Melbourne before she fled to Syria

She had hoped to one day return to Australia with her children and appealed to the Supreme Court earlier this year after her Australian citizenship was revoked by the federal government last October.

Her lawyers are pursuing the case which will be heard later this year.

“Forget me, I just want my kids to see my family, go to hospitals, take medication and psychologists, have a normal childhood,” she told AAP last year.

‘You know what my son says when [my daughter] is sleeping, look Mommy [she’s] death. This is a mess, he’s three years old, how can he know what death is? ‘

She also reportedly would in a video obtained by the ABC last year, an American humanitarian aid worker said she was desperate to come home.

“I want to go back to my country,” said the woman who was supposedly Mrs. Duman.

“I think everyone is asking because I’m an Australian citizen.”

‘My children have the right to be treated like normal children.

“I understand the anger they have towards many of us here, but the kids don’t have to suffer.”

Zehra Duman left Melbourne at the age of 19 to join the terrorist group in 2014. Pictured: the woman believed to be Duman along with aid workers

Zehra Duman left Melbourne at the age of 19 to join the terrorist group in 2014. Pictured: the woman believed to be Duman along with aid workers

Zehra Duman left Melbourne at the age of 19 to join the terrorist group in 2014. Pictured: the woman believed to be Duman along with aid workers

Australian citizens with dual citizenship can lose their citizenship if they fight for an enemy force or participate in certain criminal activities.

At least 65 Australian women and children are among the more than 70,000 refugees living in dire conditions in the Al-Hol, or al-Hawl, camp for displaced people from the former IS area in north-eastern Syria, near the border with Iraq.

Ms. Coskun pleaded with the Australian government to bring her daughter and two grandchildren home in a rare interview with SBS Dateline 12 months ago.

She said she had been trying to save her daughter for the past three years and described the conditions in Al-Hol as dangerous.

“She could be killed there tomorrow,” said Mrs. Coskun.

“It’s alarming to think my child lives in a tent with two babies.”

She added that Zehra described her behavior of fleeing to Syria to join ISIS as a “stupid mistake.”

“We all make mistakes and she regrets what she did,” Mrs. Coskun said.

“She should be able to come home.”

Mrs. Duman's first husband, Mahmoud Abdullatif (pictured), was murdered shortly after their marriage

Mrs. Duman's first husband, Mahmoud Abdullatif (pictured), was murdered shortly after their marriage

Mrs. Duman’s first husband, Mahmoud Abdullatif (pictured), was murdered shortly after their marriage

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