Australians stunned at Americans not singing ‘hip hip hooray’ after happy birthday

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Aussies are stunned to hear that some countries don’t say ‘hip hip hooray!’ on birthdays – when the unspoken rule for who gets to start EVERY time is revealed

  • Australians Can’t Believe Americans Have Never Heard Of ‘Hip Hip Hooray’
  • Aussies end ‘happy birthday’ with the extra chant, but Americans never do
  • A caller from Kyle and Jackie O said there’s an ‘unspoken rule’ about who says ‘hip hip’
  • He said it’s always the ‘biggest, fattest guy with the deepest voice’

Australians don’t believe that Americans never end ‘happy birthday’ with ‘hip hip hooray’.

Callers to KIIS FM’s Kyle and Jackie O Show on Tuesday were surprised that the traditional Australian way of ending the celebratory tune is rarely sung in the US, after an expat from Georgia revealed he had never heard the chant until he moved to Down Under in a now viral TikTok video.

The cheer, believed to have started as a toast in Britain in the early 1800s, is common in many countries including Ireland, Germany, South Africa, Fiji and the UK, but it is strange to all who grew up in the US.

One man said there was an “unspoken rule” that “hip hip” is always shouted by the “biggest, fattest guy with the deepest voice,” forcing the rest of the group to reply, “Hooray!”

Shock jock Kyle Sandilands (pictured) says he’s always the one to shout ‘hip hip hooray’ in his circle of friends

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“On the day no one decides who says hip hip, but everyone knows exactly who it is going to be… he has never disputed. Nobody ever says it at the same time,’ he said.

“The more you think about it, the weirder it gets.”

Kyle agreed, saying, “It’s true! I’m the one who always shouts hip hip in my circle of friends.’

Jackie said she was never the one to yell “hip hip,” to which Kyle replied, “Yeah, because you’re not sturdy enough.”

Jackie said she’d always believed that hip hip hooray was universal, but a URuguayan’s production assistant on the show also insisted that he had never heard of the chanting before moving to Australia.

The duo faced criticism after they posted an Instagram video claiming that “only Aussies” sing “hip hip hooray.”

'Hip hip hooray', a cheer believed to have started as a toast in Britain in the early 1800s, is common in many countries, but it's strange to anyone who grew up in the US (stock image)

‘Hip hip hooray’, a cheer believed to have started as a toast in Britain in the early 1800s, is common in many countries, but it’s strange to anyone who grew up in the US (stock image)

Viewers were quick to correct them, with many calling the clip “fake news.”

“Not true guys, the British do it too,” replied one.

England does this too. Fake news,” a second said, while a third added, “We always do it in Ireland too.”

The debate comes after American expat Adam Foskey took to TikTok to share his surprise at the Australian addition ‘hip hip hooray’.

While the cheers aren’t common in the US, Foskey said it’s something he can get behind “because it adds to the whole birthday vibe.”

Adam Foskey (pictured) was stunned when he heard Australians sing 'happy birthday' for the first time

Adam Foskey (pictured) was stunned when he heard Australians sing ‘happy birthday’ for the first time

Viewers were stunned by his revelations, which have been viewed more than 531,000 times since they were uploaded on May 24.

‘You’re not saying hip-hop hooray, are you? What? How uncomfortable is it when you’re done singing happy birthday?’ one person asked.

Another wrote: ‘What happens when you finish singing happy birthday? It’s just… ends?’

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