Advertisements
Although it may be tempting to catch a boss who behaves badly, this may jeopardize your chances of resolving the matter (stock image)

Is your boss a BULLY? HR expert reveals what you should do if you have a mean leader – and why you NEVER threaten to quit your job

  • HR expert Karen Gately has revealed her strategies for dealing with a bad boss
  • Mrs Gately says that there are a number of suitable actions in the workplace
  • She warns against retaliation through personal attacks or threatening behavior
  • Ms. Gately added that it is possible to influence change by acting with integrity
Advertisements

How your boss treats you at work can have a significant impact on your well-being and your chances of success in your career.

Investigation shows that 50 percent of Australians experience bullying during their careers – a situation that can have a lasting effect on one's self-confidence.

Karen Gately said that when your boss is a bully, you have limited choices, you can find a new job or challenge the behavior.

& # 39; If you approve them, there is no guarantee that your feedback will be well received, but it is the only hope you have to influence change. & # 39;

Advertisements

To help, Ms. Gately revealed her best tips on what to do and explains why you should never retaliate with personal attacks or threats.

Although it may be tempting to catch a boss who behaves badly, this may jeopardize your chances of resolving the matter (stock image)

Although it may be tempting to catch a boss who behaves badly, this may jeopardize your chances of resolving the matter (stock image)

1. Avoid responding

Karen Gately, an Australian HR expert, has revealed her best tips for dealing with a tricky boss

Karen Gately, an Australian HR expert, has revealed her best tips for dealing with a tricky boss

Karen Gately, an Australian HR expert, has revealed her best tips for dealing with a tricky boss

Before you think about approaching your employer, if you think they have gone out of line, take a moment to think before you speak & # 39 ;, Mrs. Gately advised.

Advertisements

She said you always take the time to prepare for every conversation, because this gives you the best chance to respond to the points your boss can think of and in the calmest way possible.

& # 39; Consider how to handle pushback and keep the conversation productive. & # 39;

2. Be convincing

Although it may be brave to make a statement, Ms. Gately said it is important to hold those who abuse their power responsible.

& # 39; There is no excuse or justification for bullying regardless of who you are and the role you play. & # 39;

Advertisements

Regardless of whether you speak for yourself or someone else, remember that you ask your boss to take responsibility for their actions and the damaging impact that this has had.

What are more common bullying behaviors in the workplace?

* Offensive, offensive or offensive language or comments

* Aggressive and intimidating behavior

* Negative or degrading comments

* Practical jokes or initiation

Advertisements

* Unjustified criticism or complaints

* Deliberately excluding someone from work-related activities

Source: SafeworkAustralia.org.au

3. Influenced consciousness

The expert stated that it is possible that a boss who acts badly may not be aware of how his behavior makes someone else feel.

Advertisements

& # 39; Help your boss understand why his behavior matters as much as it does and what you think they can do differently to have better success with you and your team. & # 39;

4. Never make reprisals

Mrs Gately said that you should never take revenge – since this answer is not appropriate or effective.

She said the best thing you can do is to behave in a way that allows you to be proud and stay calm as you figure out what steps to take.

& # 39; Your goal should be to influence your boss's thoughts, feelings, and actions by giving honest feedback with respect and sensitivity. & # 39;

Research shows that 50 percent of Australians experience bullying during their careers (stock image)

Research shows that 50 percent of Australians experience bullying during their careers (stock image)

Research shows that 50 percent of Australians experience bullying during their careers (stock image)

5. Avoid personal attacks and threats

In some cases, it may seem that the only option you have available is to threaten your boss with legal action or dismissal.

And although one of them is appropriate at some point in time, it is unlikely that you will inspire change if they are used as a way to spike up the situation.

Advertisements

& # 39; Stay objective and communicate your desire for a positive working environment that will make the entire team thrive. & # 39;

6. Take a fair approach

No matter how upset you are, do not walk into your boss's office that is ready to take on, fed by anger and resentment.

Instead, if you have a chance to meet, try to open the discussion in an honest way: focus on behavior rather than on their personality.

& # 39; Be prepared to talk about your motivation to raise the issue and the results you want to see & # 39 ;, said Ms. Gately.

Advertisements

& # 39; Explain why you or other people feel humiliated, belittled, intimidated, or harassed by their behavior. & # 39;

If you recognize yourself as someone who might have teased others, seek the support of a person you trust (within an organization or externally).

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) femail