Australian workers would quit their jobs if they weren’t allowed to work from home

Revealed: The REAL number of Australians who would stop working if they couldn’t work from home

  • Atlassian has revealed that 42 percent of staff would leave their jobs to work from home
  • Sydney employers risk $10,000 fines if they force staff to work in the office
  • More than a third of employees want their workplace to align with their values

A significant number of Australians would quit their jobs if their boss refused to let them work from home and didn’t share their social and political values.

Employers in Sydney face a $10,000 fine if they force their staff to come to the office unnecessarily during the lockdown.

After restrictions are eased, bosses may struggle to retain talented employees if they force them into physical work, with job openings peaking at 12 years before restrictions started in Sydney and Melbourne.

Workplace software giant Atlassian, which turned its 41-year-old Generation X co-founders Mike Cannon-Brookes and Scott Farquhar into billionaires, found that 42 percent of Australian workers would consider changing jobs to gain greater access to remote work.

A significant number of Australians would quit their jobs if their boss refused to let them work from home and didn’t share their political values

Half of Generation Y professionals, born in the 1980s and early 1990s, would seek another job to have this flexibility, compared to just 22 percent of baby boomers.

Atlassian’s survey of 1,225 Australian workers, conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers in February and March 2021, found 64 percent believe their bosses had been flexible during the pandemic by allowing them to work outside the office.

Information technology and media were the most flexible, with 83 percent of professionals in those sectors reporting that they have ever been able to work from home.

Less than half or just 46 percent of store associates had been given the opportunity to work remotely despite the boom in online sales.

Only 45 percent of health workers were allowed to work from home, in a sector that, despite the rise of telecare, requires more face-to-face contact.

Flexibility in the workplace isn’t the only bottleneck for younger professionals who also want their employer to have an opinion that aligns with their values.

Workplace software giant Atlassian, which turned its 41-year-old Generation X co-founders Mike Cannon-Brookes (pictured with wife Annie) and Scott Farquhar into billionaires, found that 42 percent of Australian workers would consider changing jobs to gain more access to remote work

Workplace software giant Atlassian, which turned its 41-year-old Generation X co-founders Mike Cannon-Brookes (pictured with wife Annie) and Scott Farquhar into billionaires, found that 42 percent of Australian workers would consider changing jobs to gain more access to remote work

More than a third or 37 percent of employees said they would quit their jobs if their employer acted in a way inconsistent with their beliefs.

But nearly half or 44 percent of Gen Z workers, born in the late 1990s, would quit if the workplace didn’t reflect their views — a 15 percentage point increase since 2020.

Younger workers also want to be able to talk about politics at work, with 74 percent of Gen Z employees supporting freedom of speech in the office, compared to 59 percent of their Gen X colleagues born between 1966 and 1979 and 50 percent of baby boomers .

Nearly one in five, or 17 percent, of employees across all age groups wanted their boss to support a political candidate as a way to address societal problems, although many workplaces, such as public service, are required to be politically neutral.

More than a third, or 37 percent, of workers said they would quit their jobs if their employer acted in ways inconsistent with their values ​​(pictured is a Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras protest).  But nearly half or 44 percent of Gen Z workers, born in the late 1990s, would quit if the workplace didn't reflect their views — a 15 percentage point increase since 2020

More than a third, or 37 percent, of workers said they would quit their jobs if their employer acted in ways inconsistent with their values ​​(pictured is a Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras protest). But nearly half or 44 percent of Gen Z workers, born in the late 1990s, would quit if the workplace didn’t reflect their views — a 15 percentage point increase since 2020

Half of Generation Y professionals, born in the 1980s and early 1990s, would seek another job to have this flexibility, compared to just 22 percent of baby boomers

Half of Generation Y professionals, born in the 1980s and early 1990s, would seek another job to have this flexibility, compared to just 22 percent of baby boomers

Information technology and media were the most flexible: 83 percent of professionals in those sectors said they have ever been able to work from home

Information technology and media were the most flexible: 83 percent of professionals in those sectors said they have ever been able to work from home

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