Australian women dump conventional contraception in favor of fertility apps and pull method

Young Australian women are increasingly dumping contraception to track their fertility through phone apps and to rely on the & # 39; withdrawal method & # 39 ;.

Advertisements

With dozens of ovulation apps within reach, millennials in particular keep track of their cycles online and avoid sex during periods when they are likely to become pregnant.

The apps need up to three months to synchronize with a woman's cycle, but from there they inform the user when they are ovulating and when they are likely to become pregnant.

Yoga instructor and nutritionist Alex Bovell told The Western Australian she first started taking birth control at the age of 13, but now uses tracking apps to follow her cycle.

& # 39; I have trained myself and understood all phases of my menstrual cycle, knowing when I am fertile and my risk of pregnancy, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; My partner and I have discussed this and both agree that this works for us. & # 39;

Yoga teacher and nutritionist Alex Bovell said she uses tracking apps to track her cycle

Advertisements

Yoga teacher and nutritionist Alex Bovell said she uses tracking apps to track her cycle

Three other young women, who spoke with Daily Mail Australia on condition of anonymity, also confirmed that they embraced modern contraception. methods.

poll

Which method of contraception do you use?

  • Birth control pill 10 votes
  • Fertility tracking app 1 votes
  • condoms 6 votes
  • Pull out method 16 votes
  • different 6 votes

A woman said that as a teenager she was afraid of taking the pill because she was told it would make her arrive. She also believed that there were much worse side effects that she had to avoid.

She uses an app for monitoring fertility to check when she is least likely to become pregnant and uses this as her main form of birth control.

If she and her long-term partner have sex during a very fertile day of her cycle, they will use a condom.

In addition to the app, she has become more aware of the natural indicators of her body that her period is coming.

Advertisements

& # 39; I have done intensive research into things like changes in cervical mucus and how that fits where you are in your cycle, & # 39; she said.

The woman said she accurately predicts when her period will arrive every month and has not had any fear of pregnancy.

"I trained myself and understood all phases of my menstrual cycle knowing when I am fertile and my risk of pregnancy," Mrs. Bovell said

She said she would never take the pill again because of the hormones and possible side effects.

Advertisements

& # 39; I know that the consequences of my fertility method are failing and I am fully prepared to take responsibility and take subsequent action. I believe I did the research and know what is best for me and that it is my body and my choice, & she said.

A second woman said that she and her six-year partner use the withdrawal method as their only form of birth control.

& # 39; We used condoms initially, but they just weren't practical. I don't like the pill because it has adverse side effects for everyone and every pill is different. & # 39;

The woman said she felt she would be complacent about taking the pill, although there is still a chance that it would fail, and having the implanted rod has even worse side effects.

& # 39; I know this sounds bad, but I also have the comfort of knowing that if I got pregnant and didn't want to keep it, I would have options such as termination or adoption.

A woman said that if she and her long-term partner sleep together during a very fertile day of her cycle, she will use a condom
Advertisements

A woman said that if she and her long-term partner sleep together during a very fertile day of her cycle, she will use a condom

A woman said that if she and her long-term partner sleep together during a very fertile day of her cycle, she will use a condom

A mother-of-two also told Daily Mail Australia that she and her previous birth control partner had come when they decided that they would try for a second baby.

She joined a worldwide collective of other couples who were trying to conceive and learned about fertility periods and how to follow them.

& # 39; I worked based on that information when my own fertile window was & # 39 ;, she said.

Advertisements

& # 39; When I had my second child, I decided not to use contraception because I had always forgotten the pill and the bar kept me bleeding continuously.

& # 39; I have successfully left two years of my fertility window without getting pregnant. & # 39;

Although there are more than 400 apps available in Australia alone and more than 100 million people worldwide use the technology to track their cycles, some experts claim that the new craze is far from an infallible method of contraception

Although there are more than 400 apps available in Australia alone and more than 100 million people worldwide use the technology to track their cycles, some experts claim that the new craze is far from an infallible method of contraception

Although there are more than 400 apps available in Australia alone and more than 100 million people worldwide use the technology to track their cycles, some experts claim that the new craze is far from an infallible method of contraception

Although there are more than 400 apps available in Australia and 100 million people worldwide who use the technology to track their cycles, experts have warned that it is far from watertight.

Research from the Eve Health Fertility in Brisbane and Queensland Fertility Group suggests that some of the apps are seriously flawed – and that even the best ones require a significant amount of effort to maintain accuracy.

Only 42.7 percent of the apps tested in the study predicted the correct ovulation date of the user, while some did not ask for critical information, such as how long a woman's cycle normally lasts.

& # 39; The best have added something – a thermometer or urine sticks. Just following a tracker is not enough, & said Robert Norman of the University of Adelaide.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail

- Advertisement -