Australian teaching reveal what they think of policies for banning cell phones

Teachers reveal what they REALLY think about cell phones being banned from schools – and claim that the & # 39; frustrating & # 39; decision could lead to & # 39; conflicts & # 39; and & # 39; children going crazy & # 39;

  • Teachers have talked about what they really think about banning cell phones
  • From 2020, students in Victoria are not allowed to use their phones at school
  • The ban requires children to switch off their phones and store them in their lockers
  • One says that the line & # 39; frustrating & # 39; is and can lead to more & # 39; conflicts & # 39; at schools
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A group of Australian teachers have revealed their views on a new government policy that will see mobile phones banned from Victorian schools in 2020.

On Wednesday, Education Minister James Merlino announced that public school students are expected to switch off their telephones and keep them in their lockers until the last bell.

In a statement, the minister said that devices that are partly responsible for cyberbullying are a major distraction in the classroom and that removing these devices allows teachers to learn and teach students in a more positive environment. ;

Several teachers have spoken Mamamia to reveal their thoughts on the decision – one that they will eventually place in the position to uphold – with some controversial policy & # 39; weird & # 39; and probably & # 39; huge conflicts & # 39; cause.

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Australian teachers have revealed what they really think of new policies that will see mobile phones banned from schools from 2020 (stock image)

Australian teachers have revealed what they really think of new policies that will see mobile phones banned from schools from 2020 (stock image)

Ali *, a teacher who teaches at a low socio-economic high school, said that the use of mobile phones in the classroom is a problem, but she did not feel that no phone policy was necessarily the answer.

This causes a major conflict because children are crazy about the idea of ​​(possibly) losing their phone for several days.

She said parents often penalized the use of devices by their child at school for reasons they need to make contact with family, or their child works better with headphones.

Her conviction is to force another rule, especially a rule that is probably unpopular, could lead to a fight with teachers.

& # 39; It's just a weird policy; having more rules often makes nothing better, & she told the publication.

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Another, Anna *, said her school was back this year recently on a cell phone ban, a decision she & # 39; frustrated & # 39; found.

She found it not only useful for students to be able to use devices if they were to film a scientific experiment, for example, but removing mobile phones could be more disturbing than allowing students to have them in the classroom.

She explained the current policy at the school, which includes a number of steps that lock phones into the school safe until parents come to collect them.

& # 39; This is causing a major conflict because children are crazy about the idea of ​​losing their phone (possibly) for several days. & # 39;

Although there are potential benefits, the loss of a useful tool and the & # 39; police & # 39; and the ban is likely to be greater than the gain, & # 39; she said.

The general consensus among teachers is that mobile phones can be distracted in the classroom, but a few find that enforcing a complete ban is not necessarily the answer (stock image)
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The general consensus among teachers is that mobile phones can be distracted in the classroom, but a few find that enforcing a complete ban is not necessarily the answer (stock image)

The general consensus among teachers is that mobile phones can be distracted in the classroom, but a few find that enforcing a complete ban is not necessarily the answer (stock image)

What you need to know about the ban on mobile phones in Victoria

* From the first term in 2020, Victorian students from prep to year 12 must switch off their phones and store them in lockers until the last bell.

* Exceptions are only allowed to students who use their phones to check their health status or when teachers instruct students to take their phones with them for a specific activity.

* In an emergency, parents or guardians can reach their child by calling the school.

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* NSW prohibits mobile phones in public primary schools from 2020 and recommends that the devices are not taken to high school

A teacher, Belinda *, who teaches maths, sciences, technology, and technology (STEM) for years seven through twelve, said that classroom mobile calling is something that will only get worse.

She said that implementing a & # 39; no phone & # 39; policy was difficult to enforce, but once the basic rules were established and the students understood the expectations, following the rules was much easier.

& # 39; I think the phone ban is big! It gives your rules a little more substance and you can better link it to real-world situations if the government implements this ban, & she said.

Another Emily *, who teaches from seven to twelve years old, said that her school bans telephones – a policy that not only works but has not caused any problems.

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She said before the policy change, delegates spent time chasing and looking for lost and stolen phones and this is no longer a problem now that the & # 39; rules are clear & # 39 ;.

She added that she thought the prohibition, one that she fully supports, could also help put an end to cyberbullying because students would not be able to film others improperly during school hours.

* Names have been changed

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